BSN or degree in 'related' field

  1. Hi, I wanted to know if when applying for jobs a lot of positions ask for 'bsn' or 'related' field (with RN or LVN). Would a degree in physiology be just ask qualifying as a BSN or qualify as 'related'? Would it help or impede job search?
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    About fibroblast

    Joined: Jul '12; Posts: 463; Likes: 485

    8 Comments

  3. by   umbdude
    Short answer is no. Physiology is not similar to BSN, ADN, or LVN.

    What kind of jobs are you looking for specifically? If it requires a licensed RN or LVN, a physiology degree will not qualify.
  4. by   AliNajaCat
    Bottom line is they will always, always prefer BSN to "other." A degree in physiology might be intriguing to somebody looking to hire an RN for, say, an exercise physiology rehab program, but I wouldn't bet the farm on finding a job like that.

    Take your other degree and apply to accelerated bachelor's-in-anything-to-BSN-or-MSN programs and hit the jackpot.
  5. by   fibroblast
    Quote from AliNajaCat
    Bottom line is they will always, always prefer BSN to "other." A degree in physiology might be intriguing to somebody looking to hire an RN for, say, an exercise physiology rehab program, but I wouldn't bet the farm on finding a job like that.

    Take your other degree and apply to accelerated bachelor's-in-anything-to-BSN-or-MSN programs and hit the jackpot.
    So unfortunate, I'm just not interested in exercise rehab, only critical care/icu. I would think with a degree in physiology (with an R.N. of course), that would far exceed a BSN, the physiology degree alone (far exceed in the sciences). No offense to anyone, it seems to be far more advanced. As far as the care of the patient, and I'm not just talking 'role of the nurse', a physiology degree can do business in cc as well.
  6. by   umbdude
    If you want to get a job as a RN, get a degree in nursing. It doesn't matter if you're a PhD in quantum mechanics.
  7. by   verene
    I'm wondering what jobs are "BSN or related degree." Are these nursing positions? Or just something healthcare related that will take any sort of healthcare training? (E.g. I can think of a few social service agencies that will hire BSN or BSW or BA/BS with related experience for some of their lower-level case management work).

    Sort answer is - if you want to work as a nurse you will need an ASN or BSN degree with the BSN becoming strongly preferred in some localities. A physiology degree may well allow you to work in health care as a clinical researcher, health scientist, or medical sales specialist, and could be very good preparation for one wanting to continue on into physiotherapy or sports medicine, but is not the same thing as a BSN and will lead to a different career path.
  8. by   AliNajaCat
    Quote from fibroblast
    So unfortunate, I'm just not interested in exercise rehab, only critical care/icu. I would think with a degree in physiology (with an R.N. of course), that would far exceed a BSN, the physiology degree alone (far exceed in the sciences). No offense to anyone, it seems to be far more advanced. As far as the care of the patient, and I'm not just talking 'role of the nurse', a physiology degree can do business in cc as well.
    1) I have a master's in physiological nursing and many years in critical care behind me, and I am pretty dead certain sure a bachelor's in physiology is not "more advanced" than a BSN if you want to be working as a critical care nurse. Useful as heck, sure, but if the hospital wants "BSN" for an ICU staff nurse position, than anybody else's opinion on which other degree "seems" better or "more advanced" is not germane to the job hunt.

    2) Of course you can apply to be a critical care tech in some venues with a physiology degree. I've worked with them. They aren't nurses, don't want to be nurses, and won't ever be mistaken for or hired as nurses, though. If you want to be a nurse, and the ICU is hiring BSNs, then, well, that's your answer.

    Good luck in all you do.
  9. by   elkpark
    "So unfortunate"? I always find it helpful to reframe these kind of questions. How far would a BSN get you in a career in physiology? How many employers looking to hire someone for a position in physiology would consider a nursing degree to be "equivalent" enough to get the person hired? What would you say to someone you told you that s/he thought her/his BSN ought to be considered the equivalent of your degree in physiology? Why wouldn't that be true?
  10. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from fibroblast
    So unfortunate, I'm just not interested in exercise rehab, only critical care/icu. I would think with a degree in physiology (with an R.N. of course), that would far exceed a BSN, the physiology degree alone (far exceed in the sciences). No offense to anyone, it seems to be far more advanced. As far as the care of the patient, and I'm not just talking 'role of the nurse', a physiology degree can do business in cc as well.
    Then you would be mistaken.

    I have two Bachelor's degrees, and the only one the manager hiring nurses for ICU cared about was the one that showed I had studied NURSING.

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