You know the shift is gonna be a hot mess when ... - page 9

You know your shift will be a hot mess when your patient is on a PEEP of 25, Fio2 100, PaO2 50, febrile @ 40 degrees Celsius, maxed pressors, white count < 100, and bleeding from every orifice. ... Read More

  1. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from CardiacDork
    Tell me about it and it tends to be nursing students or visitors that say this--- although it seems like nursing students eventually become well informed and warned that if they say quiet around me .. I'll eat them sunny side up.
    I don't like eggs.

    I'll eat them medium.
  2. by   saraaileen76
    When night shift is staying over for a double shift because we don't have enough staff.
  3. by   BeenThere2012
    Quote from teacupRN
    When you are work acute dialysis and assigned ICU for the day. You have an assignment of 3 patients on CVVHD, have 3 add ons, your tech is sitting a 8 hour SLED on an acidotic vented patient. You get told that there is a tylenol OD that needs a 12 hour SLED stat. A coworker assigned med surg dialysis gets that started ( leaving med surg dialysis short), and then find out that life flight is bringing in an cardiovascularly unstable pt with a potassium of 7.5 that needs a SLED, but every dialysis machine in the hospital has a patient on it, and the ED has a patient in volume overload on Bipap who needs urgent dialysis also.
    I'm getting an anxiety attack just reading this!
  4. by   Here.I.Stand
    Quote from CardiacDork
    When you have to travel with a newly graduated MD to MRI with your unstable patient (because policy says an MD has to come even though it always ends up being the new doc anyway so it makes little difference) on vasoactive drips/vented and labile MAPs and you know if shi-- goes down you gotta step in and it's you and RT running the code either in the hallway en route or in the hallway of the MRI room (no codes allowed in the MRI room because of the metals and the crowds that come in) until the code team get there.


    MRI is the scariest place to be at as an ICU Nurse. So if pressures start tanking you have to be ready to act. It's scary and I'm not afraid to admit it We are far away from the ICU nurses, from the fellows, minutes away and in minutes a lot can happen. So your initial interventions will make that difference.
    The other night (while safely in the ICU) I heard a code called to MRI. My blood ran cold.

    We generally don't get MRIs on unstable pts where I work -- stuff that truly can't wait is usually visible on CT -- but as you know, **** can happen fast.
  5. by   kalycat
    Quote from Here.I.Stand
    The other night (while safely in the ICU) I heard a code called to MRI. My blood ran cold.

    We generally don't get MRIs on unstable pts where I work -- stuff that truly can't wait is usually visible on CT -- but as you know, **** can happen fast.
    *raises hand*

    My very first code was in MRI. Talk about a crap show. Elderly patient, direct admit, no family contacted yet, no advance directive located yet. Ugly ugly mess.

    No, didn't end well.
  6. by   Nursewifemom
    When the guard from the local jail (who you know has been sitting with an inmate/patient upstairs) comes by the station asking if you've seen a man in orange pants come by there.
  7. by   Meeshie
    Quote from Nursewifemom
    When the guard from the local jail (who you know has been sitting with an inmate/patient upstairs) comes by the station asking if you've seen a man in orange pants come by there.
    Really?? How did that one turn out?
  8. by   Nursewifemom
    We looked in all the rooms, all through the hospital, maintenance checked outside, it wasn't really a big deal that night...
    The next day the guy turns himself back in, they bring him back to the ED, we check him out, ask him where the tele unit is that he had been wearing when he left, decide that he doesn't need to be admitted, and send him back to the jail.
    Sidenote; tele unit was in the bushes beside the road, it was retrieved and sent back to the storage cabinets where it belongs.
    Last edit by Nursewifemom on Sep 9, '16 : Reason: Typo and grammar
  9. by   Jbgood
    When the nurse you are relieving is more excited to see you than usually cause they are ready to haul butt out of there and when they end their report sarcastically saying "Good luck!"
  10. by   J2016
    I come in to start report and the first thing they say is "The ambulance had to come 4 times today!!" (Not as intense as some of your stories, but as the shift leader of a ~45 bed ALF/MC it's not good either 😉)
  11. by   Lame
    When your dnr pt is on a morphine and amio drip 😩😩😩😩
  12. by   vintagemother
    Quote from blondy2061h
    Worse yet- start day full, 8 scheduled surgeries, but 8 discharges too. Happy marry go beds!
    Merry Go Beds!!!! Love it!!!
  13. by   kiszi
    Lemme add some from my LTC days:

    You see the "frequent faller" on your hall in a geri-chair by the nurse's station with a big bruise on her forehead.

    Three CNAs called out and the three that are left for 105 residents are fighting over the assignments

    The paperwork for the admit that came at 1100 still isn't finished - at 1500 - and there is a stack of charts on the desk with new orders flagged in them.

close