Would you call in sick? - page 6

Hi all, Just want your opinion on whether or not you would call out for this. I took a new job, which I sincerely regret because I hate almost everything about it, except for the kids I care... Read More

  1. by   HarleyvQuinn
    Quote from Newgradnurse17
    Well I disagree. You took this job knowing about your commute. You must of known about the lack of time between shifts. You've created this mess, now you have to deal with it. If I was your employer and I found out you were calling in sick because of the commute I would let you go immediately.
    What wonderful dedication to patient safety and quality of care! Not to mention employee safety. I'll bet you're also a delight when a state of emergency related to weather is called, family death, or other tragedies. OP, does your car insurance cover total destruction? Or should that be a question for life insurance policy? I wonder if any employer-provided life insurance would be denied based on the "reckless driving charge" applied for driving while impaired by sleep deprivation. Not to mention that falling asleep at work is an egregious error that'll result in termination, and you can be turned into the board for your practice being impaired and unsafe due to sleep deprivation. Gotta make sure that employer is convenience, though! Even if it costs you life or limb or patient safety. Yeesh.
  2. by   HarleyvQuinn
    Quote from CaffeinePOQ4HPRN
    If you are too "exhausted to safely drive or care for patients"... then YES you should call in sick. I would highly recommend you keep your eyes open and look/apply for other jobs. No need to kill yourself over this job. You can't take care of other people if you don't take care of yourself. Put yourself FIRST!

    Nursing schools worldwide love to tout a (naive) doe-eyed, unrealistic/ unsustainable, abusive, self-neglecting, sunshine farting rainbows Florence Nightingale kind of martyrdom... which is just plain STUPID. Follow that model and you'll be crippled with musculoskeletal injuries (or worse, die of some acquired infection... ahem...remember when SARS? EBOLA? reached out neck of North America) before your career has even really started.

    You are important, you health is important and you are worthy of taking care of and safeguarding your health. Never let some moron convince you otherwise or try to guilt you into over-extending yourself/put yourself (and consequently others) at increased risk for harm. Eff em! Call in sick That's why this cash-rich hospitals/intuitions call on staffing agencies or per diem nurses to fill in the gaps... aka: they don't care about you. You as a nurse are disposable, however in your circumstances, you have a legitimate reason to call in sick, because extreme sleep deprivation and exhaustion are a serious health concern.

    TAKE GOOD CARE OF YOURSELF AND YOUR HEALTH FIRST!
    OH MY GOD THIS. Thank you! This needs to be repeated so much. So often.

    "Nursing schools worldwide love to tout a (naive) doe-eyed, unrealistic/ unsustainable, abusive, self-neglecting, sunshine farting rainbows Florence Nightingale kind of martyrdom... which is just plain STUPID. Follow that model and you'll be crippled with musculoskeletal injuries (or worse, die of some acquired infection... ahem...remember when SARS? EBOLA? reached out neck of North America) before your career has even really started. "

    This. This. This. THIS. I ran into this not just in nursing, but on steroids in military nursing. Know what it got me? A disability. Now I get to live with looks of scorn and treated like a piece of absolute crap by coworkers and managers alike for daring to try to continue working with such ugliness, without perfection, and unwilling to continue to martyr myself for the convenience of being a number in a staffing ratio. Living this way does NOTHING to provide safe, effective, high value care to patients. It puts them at higher risk for harm. You already acknowledged the crap show this place is. Get a better gig closer to where you are and take it as a lesson learned.
  3. by   EdenAndEve
    Hi OP - I found myself in the same
    position just 2 weeks ago. I'm a new orientee, came
    down with the flu and decided not to call out. My decision was influenced by an unsupportive preceptor and a threatening manager's advice to "do what you need to do". Additionally, I knew my preceptor didnt want to take the patient work load, so (not) surprisingly she called out sick herself when she thought I would. I am also trying to look for a new job. Too bad because I like the patient demographic at this unit. If I were to do it again, I probably wouldnt call out - I relate to your mortgage and financial responsibilities. It just really blows when I feel like I dont have a choice.
  4. by   By-a-thred, RN
    "Well I disagree. You took this job knowing about your commute. You must of known about the lack of time between shifts. You've created this mess, now you have to deal with it. If I was your employer and I found out you were calling in sick because of the commute I would let you go immediately."
    Ahhh, just another compassionate member of the nursing community passing judgement. Forget that she's exhausted and could make an error that puts a patient at risk! Just make sure that shift is covered!
  5. by   LPN2018
    Yes I would. I rented a spare room to a travel nurse for a couple hundred bucks a month (same as gas $).
    Well-worth the safety at work after nights 1 and 2 then straight home after night 3.
    No immediate relocation was needed.
  6. by   Lil Nel
    Quote from Newgradnurse17
    Well I disagree. You took this job knowing about your commute. You must of known about the lack of time between shifts. You've created this mess, now you have to deal with it. If I was your employer and I found out you were calling in sick because of the commute I would let you go immediately.
    Sometimes folks just need a job.

    The OP stated that she had worked days. The problem came in shifting over to nightshift.

    I don't think your response was helpful.

    But you weren't looking to help, just criticize.

    Nice.
  7. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Newgradnurse17
    Well I disagree. You took this job knowing about your commute. You must of known about the lack of time between shifts. You've created this mess, now you have to deal with it. If I was your employer and I found out you were calling in sick because of the commute I would let you go immediately.
    You'd be doing her a favor.
  8. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from AnnieOaklyRN
    Thank you everyone for the comments. I did call out sick, as again it just wasn't safe for me to care for patients or drive! Alas the applications and resumes are out there, so I am hoping I find a closer to home job soon, that doesn't involve flip flopping shifts and catty people stuck in an office space the size of a small closet!

    annie
    I was once offered a Day/Night position. I figured I'd be chronically exhausted, as sleeping during the day was impossible for me. I got no more than a couple of hours.

    There was an open 3-11 shift, which I promptly took. Problem solved.

    Get a straight shift. Even straight Nights would be better than Day/Night rotating.
  9. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from AnnieOaklyRN
    Just to clarify the actual physical commute driving, with little to no traffic is 50 minutes which is more then doable. The only time I get this is when its a saturday or sunday shift that starts at 7 am, otherwise its horrendous. I figured it wouldn't be nearly as bad as it is during the off shifts (11a-11p and 7p-7a) but it is unfortunately. I also try and take public transportation to avoid having to sit in the traffic, as I find it a little more relaxing, the problem is is that it takes 2-3 hours going that way. No easy solution

    I have tried to work with the manager, as the traffic is a bit less during off shifts and it takes 1.5 -2 hours instead of more during those times, but she says she cannot do it. I was actually told could work 11a-11 pm during my interview once off orientation, and clearly that was missinformation. I was also told I would do a couple nights per a schedule (it is actually 6 plus a schedule), and that there would only be 2 or so call shifts per an entire schedule (there are usually 1 to 2 a week for each person!).

    Just to reiterate my decision to leave is NOT just based on commute time, its the team dynamics and the job itself, and the schedule which they were not honestly about during my interview. Since I started 5 plus people have left, the team has very poor morale and it isn't getting any better anytime soon.

    The city where this job is, is EXTREMELY EXPENSIVE, as in a 1 bedroom apartment in a slummy part of town cost about 2000.00 a month. A hotel room is 200.00 plus a night, so those are not options. I own a house in the woods and prefer that, and I would never live in any city! I have always wanted to work at this hospital, thus I accepted the job knowing that it may not work out, or it may end up being my dream job. It hasn't worked out, so I am looking for a new one. There are many people in this world who have taken jobs only to realize it was a big mistake... it happens!


    Annie
    Are there any call rooms? Or could you get a room in the Nurses' Residence if there is one. You could go there immediately after your shift and maybe catch a nap before you drive home.
  10. by   RN-dancer
    Nurses gets sick too. People act like nurses don't need eat piss or cry. Listen hospitals will run just fine with or without. If you need to call out just do it appropriately.
  11. by   By-a-thred, RN
    Quote from RN-dancer
    Nurses gets sick too. People act like nurses don't need eat piss or cry. Listen hospitals will run just fine with or without. If you need to call out just do it appropriately.
    They won't "run just fine" but your butt isn't the one on the chopping block if you make a mistake because of exhaustion. It's well past time for hospitals, nursing home, etc. to understand that the more they take advantage of their staff the higher their lawsuit exposure is.
  12. by   KelRN215
    Quote from AnnieOaklyRN
    Just to clarify the actual physical commute driving, with little to no traffic is 50 minutes which is more then doable. The only time I get this is when its a saturday or sunday shift that starts at 7 am, otherwise its horrendous. I figured it wouldn't be nearly as bad as it is during the off shifts (11a-11p and 7p-7a) but it is unfortunately. I also try and take public transportation to avoid having to sit in the traffic, as I find it a little more relaxing, the problem is is that it takes 2-3 hours going that way. No easy solution

    I have tried to work with the manager, as the traffic is a bit less during off shifts and it takes 1.5 -2 hours instead of more during those times, but she says she cannot do it. I was actually told could work 11a-11 pm during my interview once off orientation, and clearly that was missinformation. I was also told I would do a couple nights per a schedule (it is actually 6 plus a schedule), and that there would only be 2 or so call shifts per an entire schedule (there are usually 1 to 2 a week for each person!).

    Just to reiterate my decision to leave is NOT just based on commute time, its the team dynamics and the job itself, and the schedule which they were not honestly about during my interview. Since I started 5 plus people have left, the team has very poor morale and it isn't getting any better anytime soon.

    The city where this job is, is EXTREMELY EXPENSIVE, as in a 1 bedroom apartment in a slummy part of town cost about 2000.00 a month. A hotel room is 200.00 plus a night, so those are not options. I own a house in the woods and prefer that, and I would never live in any city! I have always wanted to work at this hospital, thus I accepted the job knowing that it may not work out, or it may end up being my dream job. It hasn't worked out, so I am looking for a new one. There are many people in this world who have taken jobs only to realize it was a big mistake... it happens!


    Annie
    I know your immediate issue was solved but the cost of living you quote here is simply not true. I live in the city you're speaking of and my mortgage for a 3BR house is less than what you say rent is for a 1 BR apartment in "a slummy part of the city." I live in a residential section of the city that is nowhere near slummy. I have friends who own a 2 BR condo in a nice part of a neighborhood you might consider "slummy" and rent it out for ~$1300/month. I lived in an apartment in the city for 4 years before I bought my house (in an area by a lot of colleges) and rent was less than $1000/month. I have stayed at hotels by the airport when I had early morning flights and wanted to maximize my sleep for less than $80/night. We just got married and none of our out-of-town guests paid anywhere close to $200/night for a hotel room. And I just checked Priceline and there's an Express Deal today for the Hilton in Back Bay for $96 as well as a deal for the Park Plaza for $65 for tonight.

    Everyone thinks this hospital is their "dream" employer until they actually work there.
  13. by   Lil Nel
    Quote from KelRN215
    I know your immediate issue was solved but the cost of living you quote here is simply not true. I live in the city you're speaking of and my mortgage for a 3BR house is less than what you say rent is for a 1 BR apartment in "a slummy part of the city." I live in a residential section of the city that is nowhere near slummy. I have friends who own a 2 BR condo in a nice part of a neighborhood you might consider "slummy" and rent it out for ~$1300/month. I lived in an apartment in the city for 4 years before I bought my house (in an area by a lot of colleges) and rent was less than $1000/month. I have stayed at hotels by the airport when I had early morning flights and wanted to maximize my sleep for less than $80/night. We just got married and none of our out-of-town guests paid anywhere close to $200/night for a hotel room. And I just checked Priceline and there's an Express Deal today for the Hilton in Back Bay for $96 as well as a deal for the Park Plaza for $65 for tonight.

    Everyone thinks this hospital is their "dream" employer until they actually work there.
    Are you talking about MGH?

    I stayed at the Back Bay Sheraton this summer, and it was over $200 a night.

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