Would this be bad to do??

  1. I just started working as a new-grad/resident on a med-surg floor. I dont like it much but its only been a few shifts so thats okay. I just saw a job posting for a labor and delivery residency at another hospital that starts in January. I really want to do L&D so I want to apply for this job. Is that bad to do, I mean leave my current residency if I get this other job??
    And if I get an interview, do I tell the NM that I'm currently in a residency program??

    I'd like to stay in my current residency for awhile because I need the money and it would be good learning experience, and the other job wouldnt start til January.
    This may not matter even because its not like I would be gauranteed that other job. I just wondered if it was wrong to do that.
    Carrie
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    About shortstuff31117

    Joined: Dec '05; Posts: 170; Likes: 55
    LDRP Nurse
    Specialty: OB

    6 Comments

  3. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    This soon, i would say so (bad, that is).

    I'd give this one position a little bit before applying to another.
  4. by   barbie90210
    [font=book antiqua]i think you should apply for the job. you already know you don't like working in med/surg. you are trained to do the work so why not stay until the middle of december and then give a two-week notice? you don't even know how things will work out with this current job as you have not yet passed a probationary period. why pass up an opportunity to work in an area you very much desire unless you have signed a contract with your current employer or received some type of bonus? the only thing you owe them is a job well done and proper notice. also, you have no idea if the job being offered will be available in january. things happen and they could even cancel your start date and the position. additionally many people have been hired in all areas without med surg experience. don't let feelings of guilt keep you from reaching for something you really want. do not tell your present employer anything but make sure the other hospital knows it cannot call for a reference at this time - obviously because you are still there! that may be tricky since it seems you are a new nurse. however, if you are starting a training program they should not really need a reference from your current employer- if you can provide other references. be honest with the hospital offering the position and let them make the decision whether to hire you. i have known quite a few people to accept positions for example on a night shift with promises to move to day shift - and they wait years for them and never move. by the same token hospitals keep people in undesirable areas sometimes refusing to put them in training programs - or using minor negative feedback on evaluations to prevent them from moving. most of the nurses i have known had to leave their current employer to change from part-time to per diem or advance to another area. hospitals just want to stall you so they won't have to replace you. you have to think for yourself. you are doing the job - not them. labor and delivery is demanding and stressful. you will have to be nrp certified so that involves learning about infants, learn to scrub and circulate for c-sections, and deal with emergency situations. some people like it a lot but there is definitely a training curve and you have to devote yourself completely. the above poster is a good example of everything that is wrong with our profession. at all costs do not think for yourself. be loyal to the facility and sacrifice your health and well being for the patients by taking on unsafe and impossible work loads. do not be manipulated. be loyal to yourself and use proper business etiquette. i'm sure you asked your current employer for a spot in l&d and they didn't offer it to you. why? because they probably knew you were desparate as a new grad and they could lock you in for a couple of years or more. you will have to run the risk that someone at the other facility will talk to your employer "off the record". life is full of risks and they can't be avoided. i hope you follow your heart by being loyal to yourself first and good luck!
  5. by   Mulan
    Sometimes you have to do what's best for you.
  6. by   shortstuff31117
    [font=book antiqua]"be honest with the hospital offering the position and let them make the decision whether to hire you. "
    [font=book antiqua][color=#00bfff]
    you dont happen to have any advice on how to word this do you? :-) i'm just not sure how you say, well please dont call this person for a reference! i guess i'm not creative that way!

    thanks for the advice though, i do need to do what's best for me..i really dont like med-surg much, it is a good learning experience though!

    carrie
  7. by   barbie90210
    [font=book antiqua]most of the time there is a place to check on the application if it is ok to contact an employer. it might say something like "may we contact". if there is, check no and explain that you are still employed there. most people will understand that. filling out an application and interviewing for a position doesn't guarantee anything. there is nothing wrong with filling out an application. then when you get the details about the training period, shift, and pay you can further decide. maybe you will decide that the entire package is not as appealing as you thought. that's the purpose of applying - so you can find out everything. your smallest problem is quitting your other job if you get the offer. my guess is even if your current hospital found out you were looking they wouldn't fire you. if they did it is still within the probationary period. i believe they have a right to fire you at any time during that period and don't really need to give you a reason. during the interview the nurse manager will probably ask about your circumstances. certainly if they aren't going to hire you they wouldn't want to ruin your current employment. sometimes you even fill out the reference form to indicate where it should be sent. just fill out one that isn't your current employment. say something like "i am very interested in the position because labor and delivery is and always has been my career goal. however, i do not want to reveal to my present employer that i am looking for another position as it may jeopardize my current employment". when they learn that you are really focused on labor and delivery they are likely to snap you up. that's really what is needed in a job. someone who loves doing it . and believe me there are many, many openings for labor and delivery nurses. registry, travel assignments, etc. anything like critical care, labor and delivery, emergency or nicu is in very high demand. if they are willing to take new grads it would be in your best interest to go for it. sounds like you are good to go - let us know what happens! :redpinkhe
    Last edit by barbie90210 on Oct 23, '06
  8. by   Lacie
    Quote from barbie90210
    [font=book antiqua]most of the time there is a place to check on the application if it is ok to contact an employer. it might say something like "may we contact". if there is, check no and explain that you are still employed there. most people will understand that. filling out an application and interviewing for a position doesn't guarantee anything. there is nothing wrong with filling out an application. then when you get the details about the training period, shift, and pay you can further decide. maybe you will decide that the entire package is not as appealing as you thought. that's the purpose of applying - so you can find out everything. your smallest problem is quitting your other job if you get the offer. my guess is even if your current hospital found out you were looking they wouldn't fire you. if they did it is still within the probationary period. i believe they have a right to fire you at any time during that period and don't really need to give you a reason. during the interview the nurse manager will probably ask about your circumstances. certainly if they aren't going to hire you they wouldn't want to ruin your current employment. sometimes you even fill out the reference form to indicate where it should be sent. just fill out one that isn't your current employment. say something like "i am very interested in the position because labor and delivery is and always has been my career goal. however, i do not want to reveal to my present employer that i am looking for another position as it may jeopardize my current employment". when they learn that you are really focused on labor and delivery they are likely to snap you up. that's really what is needed in a job. someone who loves doing it . and believe me there are many, many openings for labor and delivery nurses. registry, travel assignments, etc. anything like critical care, labor and delivery, emergency or nicu is in very high demand. if they are willing to take new grads it would be in your best interest to go for it. sounds like you are good to go - let us know what happens! :redpinkhe
    after 24 years in the profession, i have to say i definitely agree with this advice! if your not happy with the area you are in then you will burn out in due time. sometimes it takes making several switches in your career as time goes on to really find your true nitch. dont cheat yourself early on. i do think a good interviewer would understand. i went directly into critical care with no med/surg experience and was lucky to find it was my niche but i did build off it to do other things when i just needed a change. as an interviewer i have been asked not to contact the person's current employer and usually understood the rationale behind it with circumstances.

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