Will marijuana ever be okay in nursing?

  1. Okay I realize my username isn't the best for this topic... anyways

    Let's talk about marijuana. The fact that it's illegal is mindblowing. Let's ban a plant but not life crippling narcotics. We all know that marijuana is safer than alcohol.

    Unfortunately with the weed being legal in certain states, I feel like the BON wouldn't care about those laws. Plus being illegal on a federal level (what.) doesn't help either.

    So do you guys think weed will ever be okay in nursing? I hope one day it will be. To be honest, with all the stress (mentally and physically) we go through, a joint might be extremely beneficial. What do you guys think?
    Last edit by Brian S. on Apr 5
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    About Bakingismylife

    Joined: Mar '18; Posts: 18; Likes: 70
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    88 Comments

  3. by   klone
    I think that strenuous physical activity is better for your mental and physical health than smoking a joint.
  4. by   Buckeye.nurse
    This topic has come up on Allnurses what seems like 420 times :P

    At this point, I personally think that choosing to use marijuana is a risk to one's licence. Whatever your personal views are on the benefits (or risks) of marijuana use, the bottom line is that it is still illegal on the federal level. Here are a few articles for your reading pleasure.

    Nursing considerations for patients who have a medical prescription (from Nursing2018): https://journals.lww.com/nursing/ful...nurses.11.aspx

    A word on personal use of marijuana from Medscape: Medscape: Medscape Access

    And if you REALLY want to get involved...a link to the American Cannabis Nursing Association: American Cannabis Nurses Association - Home
  5. by   Buckeye.nurse
    Just a few other thoughts Here's the American Nursing Association's official position statement on marijuana:

    "Professional nursing organizations need to advocate for all nurses and to advance change to improve health and healthcare." The ANA strongly supports:

    Scientific review of marijuana's status as a federal Schedule I controlled substance and relisting marijuana as a federal Schedule II controlled substance for purposes of facilitating research.
    Development of prescribing standards that include indications for use, specific dose, route, expected effect, and possible adverse reactions, as well as indications for stopping a medication.
    Establishing evidence-based standards for the use of marijuana and related cannabinoids.
    Protection from criminal or civil penalties for patients using therapeutic marijuana and related cannabinoids as permitted under state laws.
    Exemption from criminal prosecution, civil liability, or professional sanctioning, such as loss of licensure or credentialing, for healthcare practitioners who discuss treatment alternatives about marijuana or who prescribe, dispense, or administer marijuana in accordance with professional standards and state laws.
    Source: American Nurses Association. OOPS!. With permission.

    And a final thought--with the increased use by patients, know the risks to your specific patient population. For instance, my patients have little to no immune system. Cancer is an approved diagnosis for prescription in Ohio. However, my patients who use to use it for pain or nausea (and smoke it), have an increased risk for fungal lung infections that can be deadly if the weed has mold in it. It's happened enough to warrant warning patients about that risk if they bring up the subject.
  6. by   cardiacfreak
    Since smoking cigarettes is frowned upon in the medical arena (there is another thread on AN supporting my observation) I doubt if smoking joints or blunts will be acceptable.
  7. by   Bakingismylife
    Quote from klone
    I think that strenuous physical activity is better for your mental and physical health than smoking a joint.
    Sure of course, but there is honestly nothing wrong with marijuana. Imagine if there was a stigma for nurses to come home to a glass or two of wine (which we all know alcohol opens a chance for addiction, which weed does not)
  8. by   Bakingismylife
    Quote from cardiacfreak
    Since smoking cigarettes is frowned upon in the medical arena (there is another thread on AN supporting my observation) I doubt if smoking joints or blunts will be acceptable.
    I'm not a smoker but I think nicotine tests are ridiculous. Not smoking at work, yes I agree. A lot of people with sensitivities are affected. But I feel like what you do in your own time is up to you.
  9. by   Bakingismylife
    Quote from Buckeye.nurse
    Just a few other thoughts Here's the American Nursing Association's official position statement on marijuana:

    "Professional nursing organizations need to advocate for all nurses and to advance change to improve health and healthcare." The ANA strongly supports:

    Scientific review of marijuana's status as a federal Schedule I controlled substance and relisting marijuana as a federal Schedule II controlled substance for purposes of facilitating research.
    Development of prescribing standards that include indications for use, specific dose, route, expected effect, and possible adverse reactions, as well as indications for stopping a medication.
    Establishing evidence-based standards for the use of marijuana and related cannabinoids.
    Protection from criminal or civil penalties for patients using therapeutic marijuana and related cannabinoids as permitted under state laws.
    Exemption from criminal prosecution, civil liability, or professional sanctioning, such as loss of licensure or credentialing, for healthcare practitioners who discuss treatment alternatives about marijuana or who prescribe, dispense, or administer marijuana in accordance with professional standards and state laws.
    Source: American Nurses Association. OOPS!. With permission.

    And a final thought--with the increased use by patients, know the risks to your specific patient population. For instance, my patients have little to no immune system. Cancer is an approved diagnosis for prescription in Ohio. However, my patients who use to use it for pain or nausea (and smoke it), have an increased risk for fungal lung infections that can be deadly if the weed has mold in it. It's happened enough to warrant warning patients about that risk if they bring up the subject.
    That was an interesting read, however it seems that they are discussing protection of a nurses' license if she advocates marijuana. It doesn't protect her from smoking it.
  10. by   Bakingismylife
    Quote from Buckeye.nurse
    This topic has come up on Allnurses what seems like 420 times :P

    At this point, I personally think that choosing to use marijuana is a risk to one's licence. Whatever your personal views are on the benefits (or risks) of marijuana use, the bottom line is that it is still illegal on the federal level. Here are a few articles for your reading pleasure.

    Nursing considerations for patients who have a medical prescription (from Nursing2018): Medicinal cannabis: A primer for nurses : Nursing218

    A word on personal use of marijuana from Medscape: Medscape: Medscape Access

    And if you REALLY want to get involved...a link to the American Cannabis Nursing Association: American Cannabis Nurses Association - Home
    Oh yes of course. I do not smoke marijuana as it's too risky. However I think the BON should use evidence based practice and consider marijuana. It's a just stigma, people.
  11. by   klone
    Quote from Bakingismylife
    I'm not a smoker but I think nicotine tests are ridiculous. Not smoking at work, yes I agree. A lot of people with sensitivities are affected. But I feel like what you do in your own time is up to you.
    Except that some things you do in your own time affects your employer's bottom line. Not making a statement as to whether or not I think it's right, but it's a fact. Smokers greatly increase insurance premiums.

    <cue 'slippery slope' argument about how obesity is next>
  12. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from Bakingismylife
    I'm not a smoker but I think nicotine tests are ridiculous. Not smoking at work, yes I agree. A lot of people with sensitivities are affected. But I feel like what you do in your own time is up to you.
    Employers don't care what you feel. They continue to test for nicotine and hire accordingly. Not all, of course, but it seems to be more and more common.
  13. by   Not_A_Hat_Person
    Letstalk about marijuana. The fact that it's illegal is mindblowing. Let's ban a plant but not life crippling narcotics. We all know that marijuana is safer than alcohol.
    Opium poppies are plants. Narcotics are becoming as stigmatized as psych meds (still) are. We're headed back to the days of hospice patients being denied morphine due to fears of addiction.
  14. by   chare
    Quote from Bakingismylife
    Oh yes of course. I do not smoke marijuana as it's too risky. However I think the BON should use evidence based practice and consider marijuana. It's a just stigma, people.
    Exactly what evidence should the boards of nursing consider regarding recreational use of marijuana?

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