Why does only nursing have to put the patients first? - page 2

Caution, rant ahead: So the other day I'm in a tiff with radiology because they want me to transport a patient that (per policy and per good nursing judgement) I'm not required to accompany and I... Read More

  1. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from sicushells
    Oh, and did you hear? According to Joint Commission, before a medical resident starts performing an invasive procedure, WE'RE supposed to check to make sure they're signed off on it.
    Yup, that's nursing's job too.
    BRILLIANT!!!

    The wonder that is JCAHO shall never seem to amaze me.

    cheers,
  2. by   wooh
    Quote from sicushells
    Oh, and did you hear? According to Joint Commission, before a medical resident starts performing an invasive procedure, WE'RE supposed to check to make sure they're signed off on it.
    Yup, that's nursing's job too.
    Well now, just because we're expected to supervise our nursing students/new grads/orientees, we can't expect attending physicians to do so as well! That would be crazy!!!!
  3. by   pagandeva2000
    [quote=sicushells;3685503]yes, we all have to do our jobs, but nursing ends up being the ones staying over to write up incident reports or try to email dept managers to try to get something done.
    i'm expected to email my manager everytime a med is late or missing from pharmacy.
    oh, and i have to call pharmacy and go get the med.
    and i have to makes sure the techs are doing their jobs.
    and make sure the patient gets water/pain meds/oxygen (you know, the little things)
    so... yeah, i resent when management tells me it's my responsibility to make sure all other disciplines are doing what they are supposed to be doing, in a timely fashion.
    oh, and did you hear? according to joint commission, before a medical resident starts performing an invasive procedure, we're supposed to check to make sure they're signed off on it.
    yup, that's nursing's job too.[/
    quote]


    yeah, that set the rns off in my hospital as well. they tell us that the list is 'easy to find on the hospital intranet', but when you jump thru the hoops navigating this list, it is a mile long, with the names of the residents and what they are cleared to do. of course, mind you, it is outdated (some have been cleared to do more-or some have graduated and left the system already). like a resident is going to listen to a nurse when she says "you weren't cleared!!". we are not paid to supervise them, what happened to the attendings that cleared these residents?? why aren't they coming with them? another reason for confrontation and ill feelings between medicine and nursing.
  4. by   canoehead
    I got an IV on a very fearful 12yo once, and a few hours later the Xray tech decided he didn't like the pigtail attached to the site, and brought the patient back to the department for me to change it. He is fully qualified to start the IV from scratch himself, and there was no policy stating what kind of pigtail needed/didn't need to be there. I told him he was welcome to use our equipment but I wan't touching an IV that was perfectly good. He cussed me out in the lobby, yelling with witnesses. I wrote him up, and got the witness to sign, and the result of all that? I was called into a meeting with him, my manager and his manager. They all created a policy that forced nursing to change over all IV's to radiology's preferred equipment before the patients went over.
  5. by   wooh
    ^^Not surprised. Any chance to save another department time or energy that comes at nursing's expense is usually jumped at.
  6. by   cursedandblessed
    don't forget they are also responsible for the patient who had an order for the dietician written 6 days ago, it's now monday, the dietician hasn't bothered to show up, but it's still the nurses fault. and don't forget the dietician's don't work on the weekends and why is the nurse upset--well the doc screeched at her because the dietician hasn't bothered to show, pt is ready to be discharged and probably won't hear a thing the dietician has said.
  7. by   Ayvah
    its sad but true
  8. by   RN1982
    Quote from sicushells
    Yes, we all have to do our jobs, but nursing ends up being the ones staying over to write up incident reports or try to email dept managers to TRY to get something done.
    I'm expected to email my manager everytime a med is late or missing from pharmacy.
    Oh, and I have to call pharmacy and go get the med.
    And I have to makes sure the techs are doing their jobs.
    And make sure the patient gets water/pain meds/oxygen (you know, the little things)
    So... yeah, I resent when management tells me it's my responsibility to make sure all other disciplines are doing what they are supposed to be doing, in a timely fashion.
    Oh, and did you hear? According to Joint Commission, before a medical resident starts performing an invasive procedure, WE'RE supposed to check to make sure they're signed off on it.
    Yup, that's nursing's job too.

    Yeah, like I have the time to call the 5th year resident or the GD attending to make sure a freaking resident has been signed off on invasive procedures. That is NOT my job. JCAHO needs to be abolished, derailed or whatever. They keep coming up with the dumbest things for nurses to do. GEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEES. For the most part, I don't really have any problems with other depts such as radiology, when they get the request for a CT scan, they call me and ask me what time its good for me to bring the patient to the CT scan. I don't see PT/OT as I work night shift.
  9. by   Batman24
    I'm very fortunate because I work with great nurses for great management that backs us at all costs so we don't have to deal with a lot of this crap. And because other departments know we will get backed we don't get dumped on like many other units.

    The sad truth is many times nurses just care more. That of course isn't to say there aren't caring medical professionals in all arenas but we see the patients more. We see them in pain, we see them anxious waiting to be taken for testing, we hear the complaints about the bad food, etc. We are the ones that witness the horrible illness, injury, etc. so we will stay late to take care of them because we are the ones that will carry it home with us, we are the ones that will worry if they don't get their needs met because we witness all of it. Other departments don't always see the face all day long so they don't carry the trauma of all of it home with them. We are dealt the dual responsibilty not just of providing the actual care but advocating for them that all others provide what they are paid to as well. It's so hard sometimes as we can't control everything and we are expected to. We can't be responsible for the behavior of all other departments and it's a shame when we are expected to be.
  10. by   canoehead
    Yes Batman, we see the results of other departments' lack of coordination, so it's natural that we try to coordinate. That translates to us being responsible if things aren't coordinated. Unfortunately for us it's an invisible job- meaning you don't notice it being done until no one is doing it.
  11. by   Roy Fokker
    Resurecting an old topic but ...

    Quote from canoehead
    I told him he was welcome to use our equipment but I wan't touching an IV that was perfectly good.
    Can't tell you HOW often this has happened to me as an ED nurse - when dealing with CTAs of the chest to r/o PE [radiology nurses, help me understand this, please!]!!

    Roy in the process of giving report to Day shift: "So Mr. Smith needs an IV in the AC so that we ca..."
    Day shift nurse: "Pt. doesn't have an AC line?"
    Roy: "3 other nurses and I tried - no juice. Sorry."
    Day shift nurse: "Well what do you have for access?"
    Roy: "I got a 20g in the right wrist."
    Day shift nurse: "Oh! You got a 20 gauge? That's not a problem!"
    Roy: *blink* *blink*


    Sooo, a 20g in the wrist is OK for "day shift" but not so for "night shift"?
    Is that so?
    What am I missing?

    cheers,
  12. by   Medic2RN
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    Resurecting an old topic but ...

    Can't tell you HOW often this has happened to me as an ED nurse - when dealing with CTAs of the chest to r/o PE [radiology nurses, help me understand this, please!]!!

    Roy in the process of giving report to Day shift: "So Mr. Smith needs an IV in the AC so that we ca..."
    Day shift nurse: "Pt. doesn't have an AC line?"
    Roy: "3 other nurses and I tried - no juice. Sorry."
    Day shift nurse: "Well what do you have for access?"
    Roy: "I got a 20g in the right wrist."
    Day shift nurse: "Oh! You got a 20 gauge? That's not a problem!"
    Roy: *blink* *blink*


    Sooo, a 20g in the wrist is OK for "day shift" but not so for "night shift"?
    Is that so?
    What am I missing?

    cheers,
    Huh. Same problem happened to me yesterday....the same EXACT one. My day shift 20 g in the wrist wasn't acceptable for a CTA. If it's not an 18 in the AC then no dice. Not all patients have those veins to stick.
    I don't know what to tell you there....
  13. by   blueheaven
    I so feel your pain. Same here. You know the saying that poo rolls downhill. Apparently we are at the bottom of the hill. There are some departments that require our doctors to call radiology or vascular to do portables on our patients. Doesn't matter that the patient is unstable, three pressors,vented, propofol etc. and they can't come to the unit to do an ultrasound....please.

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