Why are we taking vital signs on people with bed alarms?

  1. why are we taking vital signs on patients that have a bed almost on the floor with a mat and a bed alarm? If we do all of this and document that it was effective in preventing injuries why are we still treating these as incidents/falls? If a pt. is sliding to a matt that isn't a fall nor is it an incident as it is not an unusual occurance, so why can't we treat it the same way that we would if some one stood up from their chair? We would go and assist them to sit or walk them and explain the need for them to ask for help. We would not be writing up incidents 2 and 3 times a day. sure would help.
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    About Malt123

    Joined: Mar '04; Posts: 142; Likes: 9

    6 Comments

  3. by   stbernardclub
    hahahaha....i had to read this twice, i was getting dizzy...but your right, if your saying because the patient is on a lowboy with a alarm and needs q2 hour charting because of it, i agree...you already took away the fall risk. Its just another paper someone thought up, who was not a nurse...lol



    Quote from Malt123
    why are we taking vital signs on patients that have a bed almost on the floor with a mat and a bed alarm? If we do all of this and document that it was effective in preventing injuries why are we still treating these as incidents/falls? If a pt. is sliding to a matt that isn't a fall nor is it an incident as it is not an unusual occurance, so why can't we treat it the same way that we would if some one stood up from their chair? We would go and assist them to sit or walk them and explain the need for them to ask for help. We would not be writing up incidents 2 and 3 times a day. sure would help.
  4. by   redwinggirlie
    Whew, dizzy here, too. Thought you were talking about BP and all.....
  5. by   Malt123
    not only do we do vital signs, incident reports but we also have to call the doc and family. "Just calling with an update on your mother, she slid over to the matt, no injuries" " Just tell doc. Mrs. A slid to the matt, no injuries" after a few of these calls they answer the phone with " I know Mrs. A slid to the mat"
  6. by   Malt123
    I was talking about B/P Temp, pulse and resps.
  7. by   meownsmile
    Hmmm, i dont work long term care,,but thinking of it from another point of view. If my family member were prone to trying to get up without assistance and began complaining of a wrist,, arm,, or hip hurting i would think the nursing home would want documentation as to when the patient was found out of the bed and on the mat. If nothing else but to give them an idea of what time the injury might have occured and how many times a week/day this is happening. I think it might come down to accountability with family and not taking risks with insurance carriers.
    Some of these fraile old folks get injuries without even falling if they have severe osteoporosis or other degenerative diseases. Just a short roll out of bed and landing the wrong way can fracture a bone.

    Ok,, sorry i just read your next post. How often are they wanting vitals,, every time you find them out of bed? It does seem a bit extreme, but then if the patient is sick or has had a status change that made them move out of bed and you didnt catch it because you didnt at least check b/p etc. they could be looking at a negligence suit.
    Last edit by meownsmile on Jan 5, '05
  8. by   Malt123
    I agree that they need to be monitored closely that's why you do rounds and you answer the alarms. but once you do all this they are no more likely to fx anything any more than the other residents there. These residents do this all the time. they cat nap and then they are on the move. On occassion some may have a uti or something else going on but when you end up with 15 bed alarms and 3 or 4 of the same people doing this 2 or 3 times a shift taking vital signs seems a little crazy. and if they did fx something which time caused it. the important thing is to chart.

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