What's up with nursing signing bonuses? - page 2

Hello, I am going to graduate in December with my BSN. A few years ago I heard some nursing colleagues talking, and a few mentioned that their friends had moved out of state: motivated with some... Read More

  1. by   bellynursegurl
    Quote from interleukin
    You mean 15,000, not 150K.
    No one would offer such a bonus.
    You never know. They are hurting for nurses. I did travel nursing and heard an RN's horror story. But, geez if it was for real can you imagine how bad it must really be. :trout:

    Anyhow, I agree with the previous posters about the whole "something must be wrong". I wouldn't do bonuses. Did that once. It was an awful place. Left after three months. They wanted there money back. But, since I was harassed by a physician and the physicians treated nurses like crap, :angryfire and it was legitimate reason to leave. I had to go over HR's head and contact corporate. who decided to let me go on with it.

    I can tell you NOT EVER AGAIN!!!
  2. by   geekgolightly
    I was given a sign on bonus at my current place of employment and it's the best job I've ever had. It was a relocation bonus.
  3. by   MurseJustin
    I don't think you necessarily have to be wary about sign-on bonuses. I think some hospitals are offering them to gain a competetive edge over other hospitals. I know in the Omaha area most (if not all) of the hospitals are offering sign-on bonuses. Of course you do not get the full amount right away, you have to work on average a minimum of 2 years to receive the full $5,000 or $10,000 bonus.
  4. by   Tait
    Quote from pers
    As a new grad, anywhere that will offer you a sign-on bonus in the current market is not likely to be a place you want to work as a new grad. Places offer bonuses because they are struggling to fill staffing holes and most places struggle with staffing because they are not good places to work for one reason or another.
    I beg to differ. I had seven months of experience when I got my $4000 sign on bonus for one of the top cardiac hospitals in the Southeast. Now mind you it wasn't advertised, and was more of a treat when I found out I was getting it, but sign on bonuses do not always mean desperation. This was in 2007.

    Tait

    As just an FYI, my sign on bonus is broken up into installments each six months, so if I do leave before 2 years, I don't owe anyone, I just don't get the rest. I did work with a guy back in school whose sister got a $10k SOB and then flunked her NCLEX. They had already spent the money, and were expected to pay it back the DAY of the NCLEX if she didn't pass, so watch those stipulations!
  5. by   Multicollinearity
    The US Public Health Service Commissioned Corp. has been offering a sign on bonus of $25,000. It seems they have to offer this bonus because the work locations tend to be in rural areas, and a BSN is required since this nursing position is as an officer, not enlisted.
  6. by   pers
    Quote from Tait
    I beg to differ. I had seven months of experience when I got my $4000 sign on bonus for one of the top cardiac hospitals in the Southeast. Now mind you it wasn't advertised, and was more of a treat when I found out I was getting it, but sign on bonuses do not always mean desperation. This was in 2007.
    You don't feel the current market is different than it was in 2007? Perhaps in your area it hasn't changed at all and there are not only positions for new grads but bonuses for them as well! Though I think most would agree that's not true for the majority of the country.

    A few years ago, that wasn't the case as pretty much everywhere offered bonuses! Times have changed though and with many facilities cutting staffing, freezing wages and decreasing or eliminating benefits I think any thing that sounds too good to be true (like a bonus or significantly higher than average wage) should be viewed with caution and investigated carefully.
  7. by   Tait
    Quote from pers
    You don't feel the current market is different than it was in 2007? Perhaps in your area it hasn't changed at all and there are not only positions for new grads but bonuses for them as well! Though I think most would agree that's not true for the majority of the country.

    A few years ago, that wasn't the case as pretty much everywhere offered bonuses! Times have changed though and with many facilities cutting staffing, freezing wages and decreasing or eliminating benefits I think any thing that sounds too good to be true (like a bonus or significantly higher than average wage) should be viewed with caution and investigated carefully.
    Of course I realize the climate is different at this time.

    Tait

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