What is the major reason nurses leave? - page 2

What do you think is the major reason nurses leave the profession out of these? 1.) Nurse to pt ratio without accounting for pt acuity 2.) Scheduling of staff 3.) Nurses treatment of one... Read More

  1. by   banditrn
    Quote from gitterbug
    I agree with most of the previous answers. The one thing I would like to add is the "too high standards of performance" we as nurses are expected to maintain. Doctors make mistakes, serious ones, and somehow are allowed to continue to practice. Nurses are expected to do our jobs, monitor the other workers on the floor and keep an eye on other departments and physicians as well. Nurses have become accountable for a lot of things we just do not have any control over. Like the unit clerk that enters the wrong type of test, the pharmacy sends the wrong dose of med, the CNA does not report a spike in Temp or BP, and a dozen other things I could mention. I am only human, I do try to practice in a competent manner, I can only do so much though. I am sure there are many other nurses who have reached the same conclusion. There simply is too much responsibility and accountability for nurses and not enough for other staff members, including doctors, in today's medical settings.
    Very true, gitterbug. I see this becoming more and more of a problem - if anything goes wrong, blame the nurse. We're supposed to be omnipotent, I guess.
  2. by   santhony44
    Quote from gitterbug
    I agree with most of the previous answers. The one thing I would like to add is the "too high standards of performance" we as nurses are expected to maintain. Doctors make mistakes, serious ones, and somehow are allowed to continue to practice. Nurses are expected to do our jobs, monitor the other workers on the floor and keep an eye on other departments and physicians as well. Nurses have become accountable for a lot of things we just do not have any control over. Like the unit clerk that enters the wrong type of test, the pharmacy sends the wrong dose of med, the CNA does not report a spike in Temp or BP, and a dozen other things I could mention. I am only human, I do try to practice in a competent manner, I can only do so much though. I am sure there are many other nurses who have reached the same conclusion. There simply is too much responsibility and accountability for nurses and not enough for other staff members, including doctors, in today's medical settings.
    There is a term for this, that I just can't quite call to mind. It refers to being held responsible for a lot of things while at the same time being fairly well powerless to change things that need to change.

    I think that does frustrate a great many nurses.
  3. by   santhony44
    Timothy: I think you've got it!

    Even those of us who do believe that what we do is a "calling" need to feel that we are fulfilling that. Leaving work every day feeling that you didn't really get much of any value accomplished and that you left a lot undone is too much frustration.

    I want to believe that I'm accomplishing something and making a difference. I also want to be well paid while doing it!
  4. by   Era
    all of the above reasons. more so now that the nhs is in crisis and very chaotic. no-one seem to care anymore ( it feels very much like this where i work ). has anyone ever notices that nurses are so often used as an emotional/stress/anger punch bags? by that i mean that when people have a bad day.... ie. sisters/management and even b***dy porters feel they can verbally abuse us! hence the fact that i am now trying to complete a course on graphic design and when succeed in doing so, i can work part time as a nurse and work from home being creative.
    i still love being a nurse but there are days when you just leave work in tears coz of lack of support.
  5. by   UM Review RN
    I'm not as happy as I thought I'd be. I thought I'd be able to do more for patients being a nurse, and I do--but with a lot less thanks, a lot more responsibility, and a tremendous amount of pressure.

    If it wasn't for this board, I'd be going to work every day wondering what I'm doing wrong and wondering why I feel so frustrated.

    But now I know--it goes with the territory. And the territory looks pretty bleak.
  6. by   mom23RN
    Personally for me it was children. After I became a mom I just couldn't bear the thought of returning to work and leaving her.

    Of course now that I WANT to leave her the staffing issue is the one that keeps me away.
  7. by   mamason
    Quote from mom23RN
    Personally for me it was children. After I became a mom I just couldn't bear the thought of returning to work and leaving her.

    Of course now that I WANT to leave her the staffing issue is the one that keeps me away.
    Ditto...Exactly!!!!
  8. by   Moneypitt
    For me it is the abuse. That is why I wish I could leave nursing. I can't do my job because the acuity is too high for the amount of patients that I have. I am expected to do a lot of CTA work and my job too. No slam on CTA work, I just can't do both with 6 acutely ill patients. And being treated like a servant by my patients. Don't get me wrong. I love many of my patients, and wish I could do it all. But I am only human, and the super hero expectations with litlle reward, a lot of abuse, is too much for me these days.

    If I had fewer patients I could deal with it. If I had more help I could deal with it. If the patients were nicer, and by that I mean not verbally, or physically abusive then I could deal with it. But when it is way too out of balance I can't. That is why I would like to leave, but don't know how I can afford too.
  9. by   s1716698
    gday :spin:
    i think many nurses leave because of bullying and abuse from other nurses, there is a need for nurses to learn to be assertive and stand up for themselves, assertiveness is something you can learn,


    regards s1716698
  10. by   dream'n
    When I look back on the jobs I have left, poor management seems to be the key reason. When I reviewed your list I can see bad management as a causative factor for each problem. Too high of ratios and acuity; management problem. Poor scheduling; management problem. Bad treatment by other staff/management; certainly a management problem. Low pay; definitely a management issue. Inability to provide care due to administration; management problem. Seems that management is the key to job satisfaction to me. Sometimes in healthcare it seems that there are WAY too many chiefs at meetings in their suits and not enough Indians in the trenches providing the actual patient care. And if your supervisor is great, what about your supervisors manager, or even the supervisor's manager's manager. As the saying goes, ... it all rolls downhill.
    Last edit by dream'n on Oct 31, '06
  11. by   emmycRN
    I agree with Timothy. We've bought into the "nurse as self-sacrificing martyr/angel" model for too long. I am so sick of seeing nurses (myself included) who put up with only using the bathroom once in a 12 hour shift, eating a 5 minute meal at the nurses station, lifting loads too heavy for superman with no assistive equipment whatsoever, and putting up with abusive team members (md's mainly), without so much as a peep of protest!!! Why? Because we're nurses and we are there for the patients. Yes we are, or are we? We have neglected ourselves for too long and in my opinion that is why we have a shortage of bedside nurses. Not too many people lining up to be an angel these days. In my humble opinion recruiting new nurses with cute posters and sappy slogans will NEVER work. The only thing I see being effective is addressing the root of the problem. Which is what we are all discussing in this thread, the pathetic conditions nurses are expected to work under.
  12. by   puglie
    I left once to raise my children, which took me 20 years LOL. I was a dog groomer for 5 of those years which I loved . Because of the grooming action of the clipper I blew my shoulder out and can no longer do that action. I now have my first nursing job in 20 years. It is not the same entity it was 20 years ago. The biggest disapointment for me when I came back was the lack of unity by the nurses, Where I work it's all back stabbing, and writing each other up ?? ( Is this something new?) Heck the nurses aides can even write you up. I feel like I have to watch my back at every corner. I work in a nursing home and hesitate to get a job in the local hospital. I am an LPN and that also seems to be a major problem in nusring now a days . I am trying to get an RN but am finding it difficult due to not being in school for 100 years. I decided to go the excelsor route. Not sure if that was a good idea or not. With all that said I love my elderly peeps and found that I am actually good at what I do and I like working in a nursing home. When I do get my RN I think I will stay in geriatrics. I have faith in human beings and I hope that my experience with the lack of comradery is not everywhere i go.
    I think the reason people leave nursing is due to the lack of staffing . We have concurrent people working sometimes and all they ever complain about is how they cant get this or that done due to lack of staffing. That also rings true where I work. There is NO staff. We work short all the time which is dangerous for us and our patients. Years ago we didnt need insurance . But bet your bottom dollar I have it now. We are over worked, understaffed, underpaid for the work we do, and unappreciated. Of course people leave nursing and I cant say that I blame them. I was talking to a young lady one day at a local college. I asked her what her major was. She told me she wanted to be a nurse. I said WHY? her answer was . So I can make a lot of money . I just laughed
    Last edit by puglie on Nov 5, '06
  13. by   marybethm
    There are probably a million reasons why nurses leave hospital nursing. The reasons I left were: increasing acuity of patients and decreasing number of nurses. I never worked so hard, with such complicated patients, in my life. The stress is never-ending. Then add the weekends and holidays, shift rotation and doctors who are pompass jerks and managers who think you never do enough and you have a recipe for unhappy staff.

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