What have other nurses done that have freaked you out? - page 41

What have other peers done intentional/unintentional to freak you out? Good or bad. Happy or sad. On my FIRST day as an LVN, (LTC) a res was screaming in her room as I was walking out to leave. I... Read More

  1. by   anonymurse
    Quote from sanctuary
    Had seven, count 'em, seven hours of q15 min notes "Sleeping quietly" on a female who had come in c chest pain, only to find rigor had set in by shift change.
    Quietly, very quietly......:smackingf
    Smells like a last-minute pencil-whipping. Didn't look in all night, didn't know when it happened, and--clever--hoped to be tagged brain dead rather than negligent. Would be interesting to know if q15 notes were the glaring exception for that nurse.
  2. by   Luvelyone
    Quote from anonymurse
    much less this one, derivative of the first?
    maybe i am confused, but i thought the point of the entire thread was to show some of the things that can be done incorrectly so that new nurses and students like myself can read it and learn not to do those things. i think as in any profession, there are great nurses, and poor nurses; and we need to know which ones not to follow. jmho :spin:
  3. by   MarySunshine
    I agree with Luvelyone. No one here complaining about small mistakes or things that the nurse just didn't have time to get to or forgot but didn't compromise patient safety. EVERYONE makes mistakes. But this thread is about BAD nursing care. It's reasonable to discuss it.
  4. by   anonymurse
    Quote from MarySunshine
    But this thread is about BAD nursing care. It's reasonable to discuss it.
    I don't know if it's reasonable, but it's fun! Everywhere we go, there are self-appointed "thread police," scolding for grammar, whether a thing is "on topic" (whereas the joy of any conversation lies in its fluidity), and otherwise trying to usurp moderation. They themselves could use some policing. We all get enough of that kind of action at school or work. I'm here 'cause it's fun, not always humor, sometimes it gives me food for deep thought, sometimes an opportunity to look at current issues, sometimes I just learn important stuff outright--but always for me, allnurses is about the encouragement of communication of all kinds, not the stifling of it.
  5. by   MadisonsMomRN
    This may not big a huge to some nurses... BUT for me it is.

    Just yesterday I was at work (Im a correctional nurse and work in the infirmary) and the other nurse I was working with was administering a tube feeding. This guy has a SLOW digestive system. He always has a residual of >60 and we have orders to administer tube feeding regardless of the residual (I know, another issue. It goes against what I learned in school) She dumped his residual OUT AND POURED IT IN THE SINK... there goes valuable electrolytes.... And then she administered meds. Some meds clogged up the bottom of the piston syringe and instead of pouring water in the syringe and trying to gently unclog, she dumps the feeding out and injects a full syringe of air. Ok, not good. But she did it again.

    I said... trying to be tactful "I dont believe I was taught to 1.) pour stomach contents out, that the patient needed them and 2.) inject that much air into the abdomen."

    She said "I know, It will be ok... he will have a little gas." Poor guy!
  6. by   gentlegiver
    Quote from texas_lvn
    What has other peers done intentional/unintentional to freak you out? Good or bad. Happy or sad.
    I'm a Pool Nurse, I came on shift and got report from the 11-7 Nurse, she said "Mrs. Doe rested comfortably all night". I entered Mrs. Doe's room and found she had passed away at least 5 hrs before. Riger had already set in! When I went back to her (she was getting caught up on charting) and told her Mrs. Doe was dead, she said it must have just happened and I had to deal with the paper work. Imagine the time I had trying to explain to the family!:angryfire
  7. by   sanctuary
    Quote from anonymurse
    Smells like a last-minute pencil-whipping. Didn't look in all night, didn't know when it happened, and--clever--hoped to be tagged brain dead rather than negligent. Would be interesting to know if q15 notes were the glaring exception for that nurse.
    Nope. It was an acute phych intake unit and everybody was on q15s. Made it all the worse. Made me wonder how many others were only on paper.
  8. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from TheCommuter
    It greatly helps to place one's self in the shoes of the CNA, especially a LTC CNA. I work at a nursing home, and each one of my CNAs is assigned 12 to 15 patients each. They simply do not have the time to sit with one patient for an extended period of time when there are other call lights that need to be answered in an expedient manner.
    But there is time for them to sit at the desk and read a newspaper while ignoring call lights.
  9. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from Danianne
    I am a CNA and heres one for ya.... I have seen this at not one but two LTC facilities. NIGHT shift that does "Change rounds" but don't change gloves OR wash hands between each resident... example 55 residents that need a change at 0500 and one pair of gloves to do it all.....
    You need to let OSHA, JCAHO, the newspaper, the TV station, the families, and CMS know NOW!!! This is outrageous and completely unacceptable. I worked at a place once where they refused to provide gloves. We RN's were supposed to give them out - but NOT give them, if you know what I mean. I just put the box out on the desk so aides could get plenty. I got reprimanded. At that point, I laid down my badge and keys and told them where to send my final check. I never went back. Life is too short.
  10. by   teeituptom
    At my age nothing freaks me out anymore
  11. by   deeDawntee
    I wasn't present for this one, but heard about it as I took care of this patient the next shift after this occurred. There was a post CABG pt who was not having an easy recovery in the first place. (ARF, long-term vent) The nurse received an order for a post-pyloric feeding tube, our protocol involves, bolusing air into the stomach to help advance the tube through the stomach into the duodenum. Unfortunately, the nurse never verified placement in the stomach in the first place, and bolused about 300 cc's of air into the pt's lung. Needless to say, the pt needed a chest tube after the pneumothroax the nurse gave him. This incedent makes me shudder every time I think of it and thank God, I have not had to place a post pyloric feeding tube in months, but it really scares me the potential damage that can be done!:uhoh21:
  12. by   sjt9721
    Charging the defibrillator paddles while holding them in the air...NOT placing them on the patient's chest...(evidently confused about how many joules was needed)...turning around towards me with charged paddles still in the air and fingers over the red buttons..."Did you say 360?"

    Arrgghh!
    Last edit by sjt9721 on Jun 26, '07 : Reason: added smilie
  13. by   teeituptom
    Quote from sjt9721
    Charging the defibrillator paddles while holding them in the air...NOT placing them on the patient's chest...(evidently confused about how many joules was needed)...turning around towards me with charged paddles still in the air and fingers over the red buttons..."Did you say 360?"

    Arrgghh!
    Did I scare you that day

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