What have other nurses done that have freaked you out? - page 15

What have other peers done intentional/unintentional to freak you out? Good or bad. Happy or sad. On my FIRST day as an LVN, (LTC) a res was screaming in her room as I was walking out to leave. I... Read More

  1. by   Multicollinearity
    Ok, I have another one. I ran into a psych nurse who lives in my neighborhood. She works at a posh psych hospital that is frequented by the rich and famous. I asked her: "So any interesting patients lately? No names, or course." So she stuns me by saying "well yes...XXXXXXX was admitted for major depression and cocaine abuse...and XXXXXXX was admitted high as a kite due to rapid cycling bipolar..."

    I have XXXX'ed out the names she said which were the actual names of celebrities! I told her, "What the heck are you doing...you can't tell me their names and dx." She just gave me a bland zen-like stare and said "oh why not, they'll be on Oprah talking about it soon, or with Barbara Walters. It always happens."

    :uhoh21:
  2. by   softstorms
    I tried very hard not to respond to this, because it is so difficult to judge any ones actions here. You responded to the pt. as you were leaving. That means you had already given report and passed over the narcotic keys to the next shift. Your CNA was still there, which in my experience is different, most are "out the door" as soon as the next shift comes in. I also wonder why your CNA did not report to you the pts. change in condition prior to the end of shift, so you could pass this on to the next nurse. Understand that the next nurse has to have some background to go on prior to giving any PRN meds for anxiety or pain. State law demands we document level of pain and reasons for giving anti-anxiety meds. Most LTC facilities do not allow Med-Techs, so No CNA's can give meds in that setting. I think your best bet is to talk with your DON and find out what guide lines you can use. If you do not find satifation from you DON then you may contact the state board in your area to find appropriate ans.
  3. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from softstorms
    I tried very hard not to respond to this, because it is so difficult to judge any ones actions here. You responded to the pt. as you were leaving. That means you had already given report and passed over the narcotic keys to the next shift. Your CNA was still there, which in my experience is different, most are "out the door" as soon as the next shift comes in. I also wonder why your CNA did not report to you the pts. change in condition prior to the end of shift, so you could pass this on to the next nurse. Understand that the next nurse has to have some background to go on prior to giving any PRN meds for anxiety or pain. State law demands we document level of pain and reasons for giving anti-anxiety meds. Most LTC facilities do not allow Med-Techs, so No CNA's can give meds in that setting. I think your best bet is to talk with your DON and find out what guide lines you can use. If you do not find satifation from you DON then you may contact the state board in your area to find appropriate ans.
    which post are you responding to?
  4. by   NurseCard
    Quote from sanctuary
    Working Child In-pt Psych long ago, we got a package of scented markers. Co-worker opened each one, sniffed it, commented on smell, and spent the rest of the shift with several colored polka-dots on her nose. Said the kids were all in a great mood, kept smiling at her even during med pass.
    LOL how cute. Now I remember that the OP said that we could post about shocking things that another nurse had done, bad OR good. =)
  5. by   gauge14iv
    I have sometimes wondered if life wouldnt be more fun if we occasionally decorated our faces with sharpies. Could you see a bunch of bankers going into a meeting with clown faces drawn on them?

    I always loved the episode of "Friends" when Ross drew all over Rachels face with the permanant marker!

    You could make an awful lot of people smile - or at least wonder!
  6. by   sassyRN73
    This happened just the other day - I work in acute care and I was working with a RN doing med surg overflow with six patients (I am a Secretary/CNA). At 2pm we were told there was no staff to replace us at three, so we had to move all of our pt. by 3:30pm. The RN called one of our med-surg floor for report and explained to the RN taking report that she was sorry but not all of the orders were noted. The med-surg RN exploded and screamed at my RN using both profanity and screaming. I could hear her loud and clear as I was sitting right next to the RN giving report. I can only imagine how that sounded at the med-surg station. What's up with that, I understand that the recieving RN might have been having a bad day but that is no reason to treat ANYONE in that fashion. Makes me wonder if nursing is like that everywhere, and I for one do not want that kind of behavior in my facility. Any thoughts?
  7. by   ArizonaMark
    I was still a CNA at the time.
    I entered a pt. room with my nurse of 30 some years exp. The pt only spoke Spanish, so I was there to translate.
    The nurse was to re-start an IV line as the other was not patent. All began well enough, but about 2-3 min. into the arm with an 18 gauge, the nurse still can't hit the vein.
    About now the pt begins tearing up in pain. She is starting to squirm a little. The nurse says, "Stop moving!". Another minute or so go by, 30 year nurse finally sees that the pt is actually in quite a bit of pain from the fishing around. The nurse tells her, " Quit crying you big baby".
    At this point I am holding the woman's hand trying to comfort her to little effect. She is squeezing my hand so hard. Her eyes are almost pleading to me to get this person to stop hurting her.
    I began to get dizzy from the whole scene and had to exit stage left. 30 year nurse never got the IV start. Pt surely went home believing nurses are the Devil's handmaidens !
    Mark
  8. by   mommy2boys
    Quote from phriedomRN
    Oh wow, I think that's even worse. I used to work with a nurse who'd bring in homemade goodies to share with coworkers on her shift. Got tired of the vultures from the other shifts taking what they weren't welcome to One day she made a batch of "caramel apples". Looked yummy, but tasted surprisingly like the onions she had dipped and covered with nuts.
    Mean as anything, but it fixed the problem of people sneaking away with food she'd brought in
    I guess that I'm a EVIL person, but I think that I'm going to make those "carmel apples" for my DH, his best friend and my dad. They are always trying to play tricks on me and I think that this is the perfect revenge.

    Erin (who may have just declared war on my family )
  9. by   nursejohio
    Quote from mommy2boys
    They are always trying to play tricks on me and I think that this is the perfect revenge.

    Erin (who may have just declared war on my family )
    You'll have to let us know how it goes!
  10. by   k9's mom
    we all have bad days/nights at work....I firmly believe that we should tx others as we want to be tx'd!!!
  11. by   Ivanna_Nurse
    I was working midnites as a CNA during 2nd year of nursing school. the staff at the hospital were generally helpful and enjoyed teaching opportunities, as i am always wanting to learn so i accompanied to watch a foley insertion. mind you, i have inserted them, but everyone's technique is different.

    the LPN set up, tried and tried. male pt, maybe enlarged prostate? replaced the foley in the tray. returns with a coude(?) and attaches it to the bag. she picks up an opened packet of lube that was sitting on the window sill from some prior other use, dips her foley into it and states that there are no sterile foley insertions....as if she is justifying the fact that she is using icky old lube... no wonder every foley pt has a raging UTI. as an op mentioned, maybe not 100%sterile, but gee, there is a line.. sigh
  12. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from texas_lvn
    You have no idea how many times I have came to this thread. I am greatful to learn from their mistakes, but goodness it can be funnnnnny.
    I'd rather learn from these, than make the huge mistakes that I have been reading. I can't wrap my brain around some of these, though...amazing. And the interesting thing is that these nurses are probably STILL working...
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from mdinelle73
    This happened just the other day - I work in acute care and I was working with a RN doing med surg overflow with six patients (I am a Secretary/CNA). At 2pm we were told there was no staff to replace us at three, so we had to move all of our pt. by 3:30pm. The RN called one of our med-surg floor for report and explained to the RN taking report that she was sorry but not all of the orders were noted. The med-surg RN exploded and screamed at my RN using both profanity and screaming. I could hear her loud and clear as I was sitting right next to the RN giving report. I can only imagine how that sounded at the med-surg station. What's up with that, I understand that the recieving RN might have been having a bad day but that is no reason to treat ANYONE in that fashion. Makes me wonder if nursing is like that everywhere, and I for one do not want that kind of behavior in my facility. Any thoughts?
    Cursing each other out is average behavior at my hospital. I had a nurse beat up a doctor, literally..she pushed his head against the door, then, slammed his hand in the door. Now, she got promoted to case manager.

close