Waiting Has A Magnificent Purpose. - page 2

I have not been into that real-nursing-world. I have not volunteered for weeks or days or even a couple of hours at a clinic. And for all of the other queries you have in mind, I may also have to say... Read More

  1. by   RNnamaste
    Wonderful! Make sure you surround yourself with nurses of the like mind.
  2. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    You mentioned that "God never fails to impress me..."

    The light that shines from within you out to others is something that no school can teach. When a person allows God to work within them, everyone around that person benefits, as well as themselves

    IMO, you will make a wonderful nurse - take care and God Bless
  3. by   EwokRN
    Wow! That's deep! Here I am 36, a new BSN graduate nurse, and very bitter right now about not finding the right job. Your post inspires me! I was never that mature at 22! I hope to continue to live up to your level of optimism!
  4. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from MichelleB34
    Your outlook impresses me. If you continue to wait on God He will never fail you. He has never failed me.
    He has never failed me either - With God, all things are possible .....
  5. by   artist-rn
    For someone your age,there is a level a wisdom and spirituality many folks older than you don't achieve in their lifetime. Perhaps, the word is "peace?" Thank you for sharing, and yes, the world is definitely better with you in it.
  6. by   PeppermintPat22
    upon reading that, two words come to my mind - thank you. for those of us that are stressed, tired, and weary - your words are full of wisdom and peace. may your career bring you as much joy, satisfaction, and serenity as your words have brought to us. thanks again!
  7. by   jesjay
    thanks everyone. knowing that my words and thoughts are appreciated, and that i am able to give you such inspiration, it already means a lot. i will soon take my nclex examination and so i hope that you will include me (and the rest of the test takers as well) in your prayers. God bless everyone:wink2:
  8. by   MeggaRN
    thank you for your positive words
  9. by   tobesmartt
    It's nice to be so positive about the nursing career . I'd like to feel that way too and I'd like my co-workers and especally administration (the nurses_) to defenitely feel that way. 6 months is just a short time. please let us know how you feel about nursing in 3 years. if you decided to stay in this feild. Things and people will be very different. you will see how nursing is really about. put on some real thick sole shoes, sheild your heart so the pain of the bull doesn't hurt as much. If i had to do it again, I 'd go with my second choice. Now I am basically stuck doing the unappreciated work of everyone, and this is sad the this career has made me this way. Don't get me wrong , I do like and have gotten satisfaction that I made a difference in patient's lives, but it all boils down to you. stress of the job, home, life it's self, to me ....it's a poopy job............................................... ..............Good luck and I hope you feel this way 6 months later and for the rest of your career......:scrm:
    Quote from jesjay
    I am twenty-two. I just received my nursing license six months ago. I have attended two trainings and a not-so-stunning-no-seminar-at-all for my continuing educational program as a registered nurse. I have not been into that real-nursing-world. I have not volunteered for weeks or days or even a couple of hours at a clinic. And for all of the other queries you have in mind, I may also have to say "Yes, I have not done it yet". Well at least, not at this point in time...

    I am trying to reminisce here. Nursing was not my first option. However, I'm trying to remember what my real inspiration was, upon choosing nursing as my career path. But I guess, I did not find it right there and then... unconsciously, I just did.

    I find inspiration when I miss family gatherings just to attend my clinical duties; When I had to sacrifice half of my doze-off hours just to finish my nursing process; When I am piled up with nursing care plans and case studies to do; When my eyes start to say "Hey I'm tired, stop reading and put me off to sleep"; When my own grandfather got extremely sick; When I see patients struggling for their lives; When I observe surgeons cut, suture and close; When I hear the heart-pounding ambulance siren...

    But for the most part, what really inspired me is by how I was still able to make up time for my family; By how I was able to find time to rest despite of the tons of paper works to do; By how I attended to the needs of my loving grandfather while he was sick; By how I was able to be there for my patients when they needed someone to take care of them; By how I was able to lend a hand to that every physician who needed my little help; By how I was able to withstand the pain of the dying as they were being transported to the hospital facility.

    Seemingly, I am pressured. I may not yet be as skilled as other nurses are. I may not yet be part of a nursing facility. I still don't know what lies ahead of my nursing career. And I believe that many of you nurses also are. But since pressure is inevitable, I would want to see it just as a part and parcel of my work that keeps me enthused and motivated. It will keep me tough as I handle people's lives and face life's adversities. I may be a bit tired, but still, with no regrets. I know that in time, all the hardships will pay-off.

    So for the next day or so, my every waking thought would be today, I will be able to nurse something good, something better. Remember that we always have that opportunity to jump-start the life we wanted to live. And yes, God never fails to impress me. Waiting has a magnificent purpose. He gives what one deserves to get a hold of.
    And so I am waiting...:wshgrt:
  10. by   tellteri
    Hi:
    Thank you for such a wonderful story...I also know the "waiting" game...but in a little different way. I'm 53 and I start my LPN program on July 23rd. In high school, I was a member of the Future Nurses' Club..in 1971!!! In Senior year (1974) I fell in love and got married the following year, with all intentions of going to nursing school. But then I had a baby in '76 and another in '77. I needed to got to work full-time, so I became a CNA. I took care of my Grandma at the nursing home along with all those other wonderful people.

    Memorial Day weekend 1981, I was working at the nursing home. It was very old and made of wood. I smelled smoke and told the nurse in charge that we should call the fire dept. She said she couldn't because our facility had some violations that we had not fixed and she would get in trouble. The smell grew stronger and I called the firemen. Sure enough, there was an electrical fire in the wall. We evacuated everyone and the fire was put out. The facility was fined because it had not fixed the problems from before and I was fired. At 24, that was such a deep hurt and I was bitter. I still went to the facility everyday to take care of my Grandma until she died. I left CNA work....because I was so disillusioned by the whole situation. So, I went to school at night and became a paralegal and got into the medical malpractice field. I certainly learned from those cases what not to do and did gain some satisfaction from pursuing legitimate cases of negligence. But the dream of being a nurse never died and I still was a nurse at heart. I volunteered at a few nursing homes over the years and had my Mom live with me until she died in 2004.

    In March 2008, I went to a nursing home to have a resident sign some legal papers. When I walked in the door, I stopped. I still can't explain what happened, but it was as if someone poured a warm bucket of water over me...
    I turned to my co-worker and said "This is where I belong". I went home that day and started looking for CNA classes in my area. I found them at the technical school. I talked to my husband that night--he is a maintenance supervisor in a LTC facility. I poured out my heart and told him that I really, really wanted to be a nurse and we had to figure out a way that I could do this. We came up with a plan which inlcuded moving to a small apartment with lower rent and utilities....budgeting everything from groceries to cat food...cutting out spending on the grandchildren for a while, etc. The next day, he came home and said the Activities Director where he worked was looking for a full-time assistant. I went to meet her the next day and it was a perfect fit. I quit my legal job and started working at the LTC. I went to school 4 nights a week for my CNA and got my license in June, 2008. I've been working the floor since then and I love it (although it's ALOT harder physically at 53 than it was at 23!!)
    I began preparing to take the prerequisite exams for my LPN classes that were to start in January, 2009. Meanwhile, my daughter became pregnant with her first baby! She was only going to be able to be home with her for the first two months until January. I knew it would make it easier for her and the baby if I could postpone my LPN class and babysit for at least a few months, so I did. I put the class off until July (even though I was so anxious to start!!).

    Well, the prerequisite tests were done and the interview process over. There were 79 applicants but only 24 would be chosen. That waiting period to find out if I got in was NOT magnificent....it was torture! But when the letter came saying I was accepted....well, I just sat and cried and cried...and looked up to heaven --to my Mom and my sister---and thanked them for pushing me along....and giving me the encouragement to pursue the dream.

    Class starts July 23rd....Some people think I'm crazy..giving up a very well-paying job--and a "cushy" office to go to school to be a nurse...especially at MY AGE. Well, the body may be 53 years old... but the heart is still a Freshman in high school....in the Nurse's Office with Mrs. Vogel and the Future Nurses' Club. But now I have years of life skills to bring with me that I couldn't learn in school.. yes, the wait was magnificent....but I am READY to begin...
  11. by   iicre8
    Indeed these words are encouraging!
  12. by   berns10
    sorry tobesmartt i can't agree with what you said..."please let us know how you feel about nursing in 3 years"....it's not about how we will feel in 3 years, its all about how we feel NOW and believing that this strong feeling of becoming a nurse can overcome any obstacle we will face later. Because we've faced those obstacles already pursuing our nursing degree (studying the hell out of every class and saying no and "i can't do that now, you have to understand" to those we love so dear, all because we have a different more greater agenda and calling for ourselves). Do you know how many ppl would love to be in your "real thick sole shoes?!"

    i believe in order to become a great nurse, a great spouse, an example to your kids and family, a truly spirited individual you have to know what lies in that soul of yours. There will always be someone to bring us down and make us feel under-appreciated, but nurses are resilient, the "real ones" put the pain of it all aside and find that the love of the job really brings family, life, love and happiness together to form the perfect combination for living and working. Helping others is what its all about, external factors and our surroundings can never take hold of what a nurse feels inside, the love for the job. And I truly believe it takes a strong willed person to live and think this way and to face adversity at work as trivial compared to what really takes precedence, a love and self-confidence to perform at the highest level. All this will really breath life into your work and at home also, if truly that was your calling. In order to love being a nurse there has to be an acceptance that co-workers, patients and strangers will treat you unlike anyone you've met before. But facing these situations with love and remembering why you became a nurse in the first place really does balance everything out. To have that first inclination that "ya I want to be a nurse" is no easy thing to say to yourself, you have to be a fighter and realize that the choice to become a nurse will have to bring out of you the best (courage, strength, a faith). I believe that's what makes being a nurse all the more worth while.

    And thanks tellterri for your story, good luck with your program, it's only a month away!!

    And thanks to jesjay for sharing your insights on nursing!

    I'm only 24 yrs old and I'm almost a nurse because of the fact that becoming a nurse seems more important to me than anyone else will ever know. It will be tough and there will be struggles with the job, but grace will help me rise beyond all measure and in turn my love for it will spread more love to my family and friends. I myself can bring peace into my life knowing that the career I chose will bring frustrations but at the end of the day will bring a greater joy.

    If you think about it does it really matter how others perform their job and how others treat you if you yourself know your doing everything in your power to do the very best you can?
    Last edit by berns10 on Jun 18, '09
  13. by   tobesmartt
    Maybe I am being misunderstood so I will explain. There is nothing wrong to care for people and our loved ones, Don't get me wrong, most of the patience are very appreciated, however because of administration and some of the co-workers that give critism, and gossip it makes your caring job very hard. When you work for more than 20 years and you see ungrateful people that you have helped(including your co-workers) it's hard to be all cheerrry everyday. Maybe you work in a facility that cares about you. and that's good for lyou. but,, reality .....talk to some nurses that are not appreciated... let me know.
    Quote from berns10
    sorry tobesmartt i can't agree with what you said..."please let us know how you feel about nursing in 3 years"....it's not about how we will feel in 3 years, its all about how we feel NOW and believing that this strong feeling of becoming a nurse can overcome any obstacle we will face later. Because we've faced those obstacles already pursuing our nursing degree (studying the hell out of every class and saying no and "i can't do that now, you have to understand" to those we love so dear, all because we have a different more greater agenda and calling for ourselves). Do you know how many ppl would love to be in your "real thick sole shoes?!"

    i believe in order to become a great nurse, a great spouse, an example to your kids and family, a truly spirited individual you have to know what lies in that soul of yours. There will always be someone to bring us down and make us feel under-appreciated, but nurses are resilient, the "real ones" put the pain of it all aside and find that the love of the job really brings family, life, love and happiness together to form the perfect combination for living and working. Helping others is what its all about, external factors and our surroundings can never take hold of what a nurse feels inside, the love for the job. And I truly believe it takes a strong willed person to live and think this way and to face adversity at work as trivial compared to what really takes precedence, a love and self-confidence to perform at the highest level. All this will really breath life into your work and at home also, if truly that was your calling. In order to love being a nurse there has to be an acceptance that co-workers, patients and strangers will treat you unlike anyone you've met before. But facing these situations with love and remembering why you became a nurse in the first place really does balance everything out. To have that first inclination that "ya I want to be a nurse" is no easy thing to say to yourself, you have to be a fighter and realize that the choice to become a nurse will have to bring out of you the best (courage, strength, a faith). I believe that's what makes being a nurse all the more worth while.

    And thanks tellterri for your story, good luck with your program, it's only a month away!!

    And thanks to jesjay for sharing your insights on nursing!

    I'm only 24 yrs old and I'm almost a nurse because of the fact that becoming a nurse seems more important to me than anyone else will ever know. It will be tough and there will be struggles with the job, but grace will help me rise beyond all measure and in turn my love for it will spread more love to my family and friends. I myself can bring peace into my life knowing that the career I chose will bring frustrations but at the end of the day will bring a greater joy.

    If you think about it does it really matter how others perform their job and how others treat you if you yourself know your doing everything in your power to do the very best you can?

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