upset about title

  1. I recently took a job at a local hospital as an intern and spoke with a new grad who told me that her title for her first year (as stated on her name badge) is not RN, but CNR-clinical nurse resident. After a year of experience, it is then changed to RN. I am not sure why this is done, how long they have been doing it, and plan to ask for more info from my manager...but it bothers me. You work so hard to earn the title of RN, I just don't feel that they should have the right to decide to call you by another title. Is that silly?
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    About nurse4theplanet

    Joined: Mar '05; Posts: 1,783; Likes: 107
    staff nurse
    Specialty: Critical Care, Pediatrics, Geriatrics

    49 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    At the very least they could refer to you guys as 'graduate nurses'.
  4. by   TazziRN
    Hmm......I was an interim permittee nurse until I found out I passed my boards, then I became an RN.
  5. by   anne74
    I think if you've earned your RN, it should say RN. Plus, that's very confusing to patients, who deserve to know your level of education. If anything, internally you could be known as a CNR, but your public name tag should say RN.

    But, not sure what you can do about it. I guess some higher-up thought that was a good idea.
  6. by   The Bell Jar
    It does sound misleading.
  7. by   llg
    I agree with you and I wouldn't like it either. It is something that might become more common in the future. An increasing number of hospitals are offering "residency" programs for new grads -- lengthy orientation programs followed by ongoing support throughout the first year. During that year, the new grad is given some special support and perhaps "protected" a little from the tougher aspects of the job ... or perhaps given the opportunity to explore different specialties etc.

    I can understand that the hospital providing such a program might want to designate their "residents" with some sort of special designation, but it does seem a little sad to not let them be known as "RN."

    llg
  8. by   tridil2000
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    I recently took a job at a local hospital as an intern and spoke with a new grad who told me that her title for her first year (as stated on her name badge) is not RN, but CNR-clinical nurse resident. After a year of experience, it is then changed to RN. I am not sure why this is done, how long they have been doing it, and plan to ask for more info from my manager...but it bothers me. You work so hard to earn the title of RN, I just don't feel that they should have the right to decide to call you by another title. Is that silly?
    once you're licensed you can call yourself an rn and other should too. doctors going through their residency or internships are still MDs and everyone calls them doctors!

    maybe rn intern would be better.
  9. by   mydesygn
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    I recently took a job at a local hospital as an intern and spoke with a new grad who told me that her title for her first year (as stated on her name badge) is not RN, but CNR-clinical nurse resident. After a year of experience, it is then changed to RN. I am not sure why this is done, how long they have been doing it, and plan to ask for more info from my manager...but it bothers me. You work so hard to earn the title of RN, I just don't feel that they should have the right to decide to call you by another title. Is that silly?
    You have passed your boards and you are an RN. You should have that title appear on your badge since that distinguishes your level of licensure from an LPN or CNA. Quite frankly, I'm not sure if this facility can even continue that practice. I'm pretty certain that they are not in accordance with Joint Commission guidelines. The other thing to remember is that physician residents may be referred to as "residents" or "interns" but their badge ALWAYS clearly states their title as MD. How insulting that practice is and it should stop, you earned your RN and you deserve to be treated as such. I would check the JCAHO guidelines because I beleive there are stated guidelines regarding proper identification of hospital personel and the patient's right to clear identification of their caregivers.
  10. by   nurse4theplanet
    The way I look at it, after I graduate...I paid my way through school, I earned my degree, I passed the National License Exam, and the state has approved and accepted me as a Registered Nurse. I don't think a facility should be able to remove or substitute those credentials for any specified amount of time, regardless of experience (or lack of, in my case). I am independently accountable and legally liable for my actions just the same as a more experienced nurse.
  11. by   Amber_student_nurse
    Over here in Australia, a large private health provider has changed the title from RN to caregiver's. I agree that we work so hard to get through nursing school and get our liscence that it is degrading to be acknowledged as a 'caregiver' and not a RN. We do other things beside's provide 'care'!!!!!
  12. by   RGN1
    Quote from Amber_student_nurse
    Over here in Australia, a large private health provider has changed the title from RN to caregiver's. I agree that we work so hard to get through nursing school and get our liscence that it is degrading to be acknowledged as a 'caregiver' and not a RN. We do other things beside's provide 'care'!!!!!
    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    The CNR wouldn't bother me quite so much - sorta like having a provisional driving license - giving you an excuse not to know quite as much as an experienced RN for a while. NOT that I condone it but purely from a "devils advocate" point of view!

    but "caregiver"" Oh my it makes me want to....................................

    I'd like to give them care........of my resignation!!! Failing that a piece of tape, with my proper title written on it, would keep finding it's way over their badge!
  13. by   GooeyRN
    I dont like it. You earned the title! If they want to add something after the title, or before it, thats fine. But you earned the RN title!
  14. by   traumaRUs
    I would not work for this institution.

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