'Unhealthy' nurses...bad examples? - page 22

I hope this post doesn't offend anyone,but I have noticed a lot of the nurses I know are overweight,smokers or both. Obviously people become nurses because they completed school,and are qualified to... Read More

  1. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from Elisheva
    Lucky for me that I don't preach. Teach a little, maybe. Preach, never. :wink2:
    *preach: to advocate earnestly
    *practice: apply what you preach
    * definitions straight from the MW Dictionary

    I advocate earnestly to my patients the importance of maintaining a well balanced diet, and remaining active by also living a healthy lifestyle.
  2. by   Elisheva
    Quote from Corvette Guy
    *preach: to advocate earnestly
    *practice: apply what you preach
    * definitions straight from the MW Dictionary

    I advocate earnestly to my patients the importance of maintaining a well balanced diet, and remaining active by also living a healthy lifestyle.
    You're a better nurse than I am. I considered myself lucky if I got all my IVs hung and my dressing changes done by the end of my shift. I can honestly say I've never had the time to earnestly advocate anything to a patient on a med-surg floor. Maybe I need to try being an Army nurse.
  3. by   leslie :-D
    i agree that it is indeed, a balancing act.
    it's important to me, to not come across as hypocritical (follow as i say, not as i do).
    yet, i would never want to come across as holier-than-thou, where pts do not find me approachable or worse, feel their goals are unattainable r/t unrealistic ideals.
    we all know the reasons why we overeat, or smoke, or drink-there's a million reasons why we react 'humanly' and overindulge when stressed.
    it is those qualities that can unite nurse and pt.
    that we 'get' ea other- empathy goes a long way.
    so while recognizing that most of us are not super-achievers with 10% body fat, and not a judgmental bone in our bodies ( ), it is important that we relay the importance of aspiring to healthy lifestyles, w/o risking our pts judging our credibility (for those of us who have bad habits) or our unattainable ideals (for those of us who are perfect...)
    again, it's all about pt perception.

    leslie
  4. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from Elisheva
    You're a better nurse than I am. I considered myself lucky if I got all my IVs hung and my dressing changes done by the end of my shift. I can honestly say I've never had the time to earnestly advocate anything to a patient on a med-surg floor. Maybe I need to try being an Army nurse.
    I'd imagine you have awesome time management skills, which I'd have difficulty matching. I definitely admire my Med/Surg brothers & sisters of nursing.

    I can assure my job description as an active duty Army critical care nurse varies based on CONUS, or OCONUS mission. I cherish the opportunity to advocate wellness to my patient's, as well as their family members. BTW, I thought all RNs were patient advocates... at least that is what I learned in nursing school almost 10 years ago.

    Opportunity knocks as often as a person has an ear trained to hear it, an eye trained to see it, a hand trained to grasp it, and head trained to utilize it.
    Last edit by Corvette Guy on Sep 29, '06
  5. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from earle58
    i agree that it is indeed, a balancing act.
    it's important to me, to not come across as hypocritical (follow as i say, not as i do).
    yet, i would never want to come across as holier-than-thou, where pts do not find me approachable or worse, feel their goals are unattainable r/t unrealistic ideals.
    we all know the reasons why we overeat, or smoke, or drink-there's a million reasons why we react 'humanly' and overindulge when stressed.
    it is those qualities that can unite nurse and pt.
    that we 'get' ea other- empathy goes a long way.
    so while recognizing that most of us are not super-achievers with 10% body fat, and not a judgmental bone in our bodies ( ), it is important that we relay the importance of aspiring to healthy lifestyles, w/o risking our pts judging our credibility (for those of us who have bad habits) or our unattainable ideals (for those of us who are perfect...)
    again, it's all about pt perception.

    leslie
    Leslie, I certainly agree with you... it is not a perfect world.
  6. by   barbyann
    I don't feel I have the responsibility to "look the part". I do feel I am responsible for educating my patients and giving them good, practical information they can either use, or not, at their discretion. Most patients appreciate this reality based approach.
  7. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from barbyann
    I don't feel I have the responsibility to "look the part". I do feel I am responsible for educating my patients and giving them good, practical information they can either use, or not, at their discretion. Most patients appreciate this reality based approach.
    i've discussed this w/other nurses, as well as pts, and the feedback is mixed.
    when a nurse is grossly overweight and pt teaching entails diet & exercise, there are indeed pts who look at these nurses and do think, "practice what you preach".
    but as you state, it's up to ea of us individually and decide what our personal responsibilities are.
    i can only speak for myself.

    leslie
  8. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from barbyann
    I don't feel I have the responsibility to "look the part". I do feel I am responsible for educating my patients and giving them good, practical information they can either use, or not, at their discretion. Most patients appreciate this reality based approach.
    JMHO, most patients appreciate a reality based teaching approach by nurses that practice general health and well-being... and if the nurse advocate looks the part, then so much the better. I've had many a patient tell me something like ... wow I can tell by the size of your arms you must workout often. Then, I say yes I workout when I have the time and proceed to share with them the benefits of exercise and proper dieting;
    • osteoarthritis can be significantly reduced by losing even just 5% body weight
    • at least 3 hrs of exercise/week, low-fat & low-sodium diet, can reduce HTN
    • research proves exercise helps lower bad cholesterol & raise good cholesterol
    • irrefutable evidence exist indicating exercise lowers risks of CA, Heart DZ, DM, etc.
    • young women that maintain an exercise regimen have greater bone mineral content on their hips & lower back compared to those with more sedentary lifestyles
  9. by   Retired R.N.
    Quote from earle58
    i've discussed this w/other nurses, as well as pts, and the feedback is mixed.
    when a nurse is grossly overweight and pt teaching entails diet & exercise, there are indeed pts who look at these nurses and do think, "practice what you preach".
    but as you state, it's up to ea of us individually and decide what our personal responsibilities are.
    i can only speak for myself.

    leslie
    As I see it, my first responsibility has always been to maintain a healthy lifestyle for myself. Any time I refuse to take care of myself, I deliberately run the risk of suffering ill health as a result and thereby diminish my ability to care for either myself or my patients in a professional manner.

    The foundation for my personal health plan has always been based on well known facts first learned in basic A & P many years ago and includes a number of "common sense" principles. I recognized that I was never able to function adequately if I was suffering from sleep deficit, cortisol overload, or poor nutrition. Those three factors, in particular, form a vicious circle that leads to ever-increading fatigue, muscular aches, suppressed anger leading to depression, dietary indiscretion, and subsequent weight gain.

    It has always been quite puzzling to me why so many nurses are so willing to accept very unhealthy lifestyles for themselves, and especially why so many of those who are in supervisory positions refuse to admit that healthy, well-rested employees are far more efficient than those on the ragged edge of fatigue.

    Nobody would ever consider trying to "save money" by skimping on scheduled maintenance for an expensive automobile, but some people think they can abuse their own bodies with impunity.
  10. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from Retired R.N.
    As I see it, my first responsibility has always been to maintain a healthy lifestyle for myself. Any time I refuse to take care of myself, I deliberately run the risk of suffering ill health as a result and thereby diminish my ability to care for either myself or my patients in a professional manner.

    The foundation for my personal health plan has always been based on well known facts first learned in basic A & P many years ago and includes a number of "common sense" principles. I recognized that I was never able to function adequately if I was suffering from sleep deficit, cortisol overload, or poor nutrition. Those three factors, in particular, form a vicious circle that leads to ever-increading fatigue, muscular aches, suppressed anger leading to depression, dietary indiscretion, and subsequent weight gain.

    It has always been quite puzzling to me why so many nurses are so willing to accept very unhealthy lifestyles for themselves, and especially why so many of those who are in supervisory positions refuse to admit that healthy, well-rested employees are far more efficient than those on the ragged edge of fatigue.

    Nobody would ever consider trying to "save money" by skimping on scheduled maintenance for an expensive automobile, but some people think they can abuse their own bodies with impunity.
    Thank you Retired R. N.,

    OMG! An outstanding post from a very wise Texan.
  11. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from Retired R.N.
    As I see it, my first responsibility has always been to maintain a healthy lifestyle for myself. Any time I refuse to take care of myself, I deliberately run the risk of suffering ill health as a result and thereby diminish my ability to care for either myself or my patients in a professional manner.

    The foundation for my personal health plan has always been based on well known facts first learned in basic A & P many years ago and includes a number of "common sense" principles. I recognized that I was never able to function adequately if I was suffering from sleep deficit, cortisol overload, or poor nutrition. Those three factors, in particular, form a vicious circle that leads to ever-increading fatigue, muscular aches, suppressed anger leading to depression, dietary indiscretion, and subsequent weight gain.

    It has always been quite puzzling to me why so many nurses are so willing to accept very unhealthy lifestyles for themselves, and especially why so many of those who are in supervisory positions refuse to admit that healthy, well-rested employees are far more efficient than those on the ragged edge of fatigue.

    Nobody would ever consider trying to "save money" by skimping on scheduled maintenance for an expensive automobile, but some people think they can abuse their own bodies with impunity.
    beautifully stated, retired!
    just perfect.
    i can actually state that because of this particular thread, as well as other circumstances, i am taking some much needed, positive changes in my life.
    it has taken me sev'l yrs, but a major factor was aggressively caring for (hospice) pts with high-acuity needs.
    i struggled with living a reckless lifestyle of heaving smoking, while watching my pts needlessly suffer, all out of their control, through no fault of their own.

    it felt audacious, that i would be so irresponsible with my own health, yet try to desperately seek relief of those dying with intractible s/s of their disease process.

    i needed to make a conscientous choice and not take my health for granted.
    don't know why it took so many yrs to come to where i am today, but here i am, hopeful and determined, to treat myself with the respect my body deserves.
    this also pertains to my mental and spiritual afflictions- (positive) change is warranted and in place.
    it's all good.
    but dang, it took long enough to get here.....

    leslie
  12. by   NRSKarenRN
    Much rehash info/opnions per Moderator discussion, so closing the thread on above upbeat note.

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