'Unhealthy' nurses...bad examples? - page 19

I hope this post doesn't offend anyone,but I have noticed a lot of the nurses I know are overweight,smokers or both. Obviously people become nurses because they completed school,and are qualified to... Read More

  1. by   Elisheva
    Quote from earle58


    it really is unfortunate that many of us have misunderstood the op's intent of the question, which is the patient's perception of unhealthy nurses- not our perceptions.
    yet by reading many of the responses, it is clear that whatever the pt may think, is still not necessarily an accurate perception.
    it's encouraging to read that many nurses have very healthy self-esteems, despite being overweight, smoking or whatever flaw that is deemed imperfect.
    so, yay for those who remain true to themselves.

    leslie
    Actually, the OP asked about any flak, not perceptions, that nurses may have gotten from patients and/or "higher ups". Personally, I've enjoyed reading all the posts, even views that might be oppositional to mine. It's always good to hear a different point of view - keeps one from being close-minded and intolerant.
  2. by   babalou58
    to all the overweight nurses, try medifast,it works....
    babalou58
  3. by   OB_or_NICU_hopeful
    To the OP: I think it would depend on the area in which you work (but that's just my opinion). When I did clinicals for my STNA certification, a sweet lady in LTC said something along the lines of (about me) "she's such a nice lady, but she sure is fat" Honestly, I couldn't imagine getting the same kind of remark if I were on a unit like M/B or L&D, but I could be wrong. I'm not a nurse, but just wanted to share my experience for you
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Corvette Guy
    Leslie, I'm curious as to why some here do not capitalize the letter i when used in first person, as in I?

    I'll capitalize someone's name, i'll capitalize the I if it's the begining of a sentence. But i do not capitalize i when refering to myself, because it make "i" just another part of the post, instead of being the main part.

    And for those out there that think that has any effect on my ability to write or chart, rest assured, i talk informal here, and if the way i write on here bothers someone that bad, well, all that has to be done is click on my user name, click 'view profile', then click 'ignore'. Simple.
  5. by   twotrees2
    Quote from OB_or_NICU_hopeful
    To the OP: I think it would depend on the area in which you work (but that's just my opinion). When I did clinicals for my STNA certification, a sweet lady in LTC said something along the lines of (about me) "she's such a nice lady, but she sure is fat" Honestly, I couldn't imagine getting the same kind of remark if I were on a unit like M/B or L&D, but I could be wrong. I'm not a nurse, but just wanted to share my experience for you

    oh my favorite time is when a sweet confused little old man or woman will rub my belly and ask when i am due - roflmao - i just cant help but giggle and thank god I'm fat and not pregnant hahaha. i do get teased by a few of my closest friends about that - "hey when ya due honey"? lol
  6. by   chevswife
    Hey hang on a minute. IM skinny......
    I mean I get asked if Im anorexic..... I do smoke. I dont work out but I didnt choose to be so thin. I just have a high metabolism. I cant help it. I dont care if nurses or anyone for that matter is large. Big is beautiful. Oh and sometimes, especially in aged care it can work to your advantage if your moving people, hehe. But seriously. Dont mind what others say. Its none of thier business. Be yourself, large or small. If your good at what you do and you do it with an ethical, humanatarian attitude and go to work with a smile for others. I'd be glad to have you as my nurse. regards
  7. by   BsnRnShiftSuper
    I Am A Nurse And A Smoker. But I Am A Good Nurse, And Can Still Educate Patients On The Effects. I Consider That My Personal Life. As Far As It Being A Bad Example, If I Quit Does That Mean All Of My Patients Would? I Think Not. Competence And Professionalism Is Way More Important, I Think Pt's Would Agree.
  8. by   jojotoo
    The only flak that I have ever received about being fat (yes I'm fat), has been from psych patients or drunks. But that "flak" is usually accompanied with remarks about my gender, sexual orientation, the marital status of my parents at my birth, and my race. And sometimes for good measure they'll say something about my lazy eye or hair style/color.

    I still remember the first time I was called a "fat b***h"' and it made me cry. That was a LONG time and many insults ago. I've come to terms with myself and I'm not letting other people's problems become mine.
  9. by   OB_or_NICU_hopeful
    jojotoo ~ I've seen first hand how aggressive and "mouthy" some psych patients can be to staff That comment would have made me cry too. I'm impressed that you persevered!
  10. by   blueheaven
    At one facility I worked at, a fully qualified, well-loved and respected collegue was rejected for a supervisory position because, "she didn't project the image of the hospital in a positive way." Just another way of saying she was too fat! Sad
  11. by   annamonkiewicz
    I am not overweight, don't smoke and try to live a very healthy life. But unfortunately for my patients, I look younger than I am. I get the comments from them like, "Have you ever done this before?" or "How long have you been a nurse?" One evening I had to put an NG tube down a patient and took two hours just to convince her that I could do the job. What I didn't tell her was that I had checked around on the floor to see if there was anyone more qualified to do this since I could sense her anxiety, but even though I had less years experience I had done the procedure more times than most.

    I have heard comments from patients about other nurses in regards to their sex, race and competence but interestingly enough, never weight or lifestyle habits. It seems to me that people can be cruel or unkind about anyone.

    You may be overweight or not be very healthy, but even if this were not the case, a negative, critical person will simply find the most obvious thing to pick on someone about. And unfortunately, physical things are the most obvious. Just be healthy, mentally and physically. If you're not at present, than work on it so you can continue the "practice of caring" for many years to come.
  12. by   english_nurse
    Im very overweight, it doesnt make me a bad nurse
    many of my patients open up to me as they see me as approachable and normal they have to adhere to a strict renal diet i can acknowledge to them how hard it can be, without appearing to be preaching to them.
  13. by   nurse4theplanet
    Usually, when a person feels the urge to be critical of another's appearance/habits/mannerisms, etc...it is because they themselves have the REAL insecurity issues.

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