StaRN program for established nurse-?

  1. I am job hunting due to resigning last month from my position of 14 years. (various reasons but it needed to be done)
    Never thought about Star RN ; but we have a HCA hospital 2 miles from me (I worked there 2 years- back in 2001-2003), and one of the things it states is you can also be a nurse who has never worked in Acute, OR a nurse who's worked, but not in Acute past 5 years.
    I submitted a request-for-more-info on the Careers website and a nurse recruiter will supposedly be contacting me..
    I NEVER thought about doing this or trying to; but something about it while I was on their site (applying for other jobs), jumped out at me and I thought "Why not?"
    I wish this type thing had been in existence when I graduated N.S.
    I am 56 and plan on retiring in 5 years. I know it's a 2-year commitment after you finish classroom, and it's FULL-time, hospital floor work. Never, ever thought about going back to "the floor." Assumed it would/will be too hard on my body and endurance at this age (in good health overall, but some arthritis for sure)
    Should I pursue this? Something about it feels...good to me; and I have no idea why.
    Like I could "end my career" on a positive note, or something.
    Anyone with advice I appreciate it.
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  2. Visit BlinkyPinky profile page

    About BlinkyPinky

    Joined: Jan '15; Posts: 61; Likes: 123
    from FL , US

    12 Comments

  3. by   BlinkyPinky
    Thanks SO much for looking at this 129 x and NO one responded whatsoever
  4. by   Hoosier_RN
    If your body can tolerate it, go for it! Who knows, you may love it, if not, it buys you time while looking for another job
  5. by   nursej22
    I opened this thread because I was curious about what a Star RN. And I still don't know.
  6. by   Hoosier_RN
    Quote from nursej22
    I opened this thread because I was curious about what a Star RN. And I still don't know.
    Me either, but answered as best as I could!
  7. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from BlinkyPinky
    Thanks SO much for looking at this 129 x and NO one responded whatsoever
    I can't speak for everyone else, but I don't know what staRN is. I couldn't recommend it or not, because it's not something I have any knowledge of.
  8. by   JKL33
    No knowledge of it except various commentary here. Which is searchable.

    But, since you are hard up for others' $.02, heck no I would not be roped into a contract unless it was big money. BIG. If you can rationalize paying a hospital system without a great reputation to train you for their version of acute care according to their terms, go for it.
  9. by   NurseSpeedy
    It depends on the facility but I had one HCA recruiter tell me that since I was already an LPN I could not qualify for their StaRN program but could apply for regular RN positions and would be given a lengthy orientation period with a preceptor. Therefore, I only applied for regular RN positions. I was offered up to 12 weeks orientation. I have worked acute in the past so I actually was able to negotiate it down to six weeks.

    Oh, and here's the nice part-NO CONTRACT!
    If you sign one, they basically own you. Two years is a long time if you end up miserable.
  10. by   BlinkyPinky
    Whelp , the " recruiter " never has called , yet.
    That's a LOONNNG 24-48 hrs btw ( when they state the recruiter WILL be calling you back )
    LOL. guess the fact I stated I was already a nurse
    put mine to the way back burner. Who knows
    They might want brand new grads for more reasons than as/ yet undamaged backs and knees--
    can mold them to accept the bovine scatus
    that hospital nursing has become , perhaps ? Thanks to clueless management and of course, the
    < Customer Service > , Press- Gainey mentality
    Probably figure I know the score by now , 24 years- in
    they'd be right about that
  11. by   BlinkyPinky
    And StaRN is a program that some hospitals ( HCA is one ), do to further / orient new grad nurses. Except they also state application is open to nurses who have Never worked in acute care, or nurses like myself, who worked > 5 years ago in acute care/ hospital
    There's paid classroom at around $15 an hour , followed by various weeks of intense preceptorship on the floor and then on your own on the floor with a " mentor " and some sort of monthly meeting or something with your mentor
    The hosp work part is when you are " hired in at the new grad rate" unless you happen to have previous experience , like myself would have , or say an LPN might have. You sign a 2- year contract that starts AFTER the classroom - only portion of the program
  12. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from BlinkyPinky
    Whelp , the " recruiter " never has called , yet.
    That's a LOONNNG 24-48 hrs btw ( when they state the recruiter WILL be calling you back )
    LOL. guess the fact I stated I was already a nurse
    put mine to the way back burner. Who knows
    They might want brand new grads for more reasons than as/ yet undamaged backs and knees--
    can mold them to accept the bovine scatus
    that hospital nursing has become , perhaps ? Thanks to clueless management and of course, the
    < Customer Service > , Press- Gainey mentality
    Probably figure I know the score by now , 24 years- in
    they'd be right about that
    Well, how much did you say? You do come across as a little gruff in your last few posts. I do agree that managers tend to look for paliable individuals, particularly when hiring relatively inexperienced (for the specialty) staff. If you're not eager to please, you should at least pretend to be.
  13. by   BlinkyPinky
    Ok. Point taken. Lol
    Gruff. :-)
  14. by   HalfBoiled
    Go for it, but don't tell HR that you plan to retire in about 5 years.
    Seeing how you fit the description/qualification, its fair game.

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