Staff Nurses Who Refuse To Precept Or Teach? - page 5

Of course I understand that not everyone wants to be a teacher or professor but a few of my coworkers lately have down right refused to precept or even be a resource to newer or less experienced... Read More

  1. by   Racer15
    I don't like precepting and I'm not good at it. I'm impatient and I don't wait around for my preceptee when things need to be done so that they can have a "teaching moment." In the ED, I am about the opposite of what a new hire needs. I don't mind being a resource, but it's stupid to force nurses to precept when they know it's not for them. You're only hurting the new hire. Step on down from those high horses, good lord.
  2. by   Crush
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    My facility requires those who want to precept to apply for such a position and take a course in how to be a preceptor. It comes with $1/hour extra when working with an orientee. As an educator, I have actually refused to sign off on a preceptor application from someone well known to have a poor attitude and become verbally aggressive (the nurse manager also did not want to sign off on the application). It's a way to reward those willing to precept while ensuring that those who are orienting are paired with someone who knows how to be a preceptor, wants to be a preceptor, and has been approved to be a preceptor.
    My facility does the same thing. Although I wish it was $1 more an hour. We don't get pain more money but we do have those who sign up for it and take a course as well. Personally I like teaching/precepting but I think it is a disservice to the new hire/ new nurse to be paired with someone who hates it, has a bad attitude about it, etc.
  3. by   3ringnursing
    Every one of us were precepted, without exception. We all had to learn from someone else first. I always felt it was my JOB to precept when called upon to do so. I never minded because I never forgot that feeling of being new and knowing squat. Or at times being unwanted, feeling like a millstone around another nurse's neck. I'd rather they be with me than someone who would be hostile. Being new is scary.
  4. by   MA Nurse
    As a nurse, after so many years of being a nurse (27 1/2) I really don't want to have the added stress of helping a new nurse. I've done it enough over the years and it's not required, so nurses who want to do it should, those of us who don't, shouldn't. It will also be better for the new nurse not to be trained by a nurse who doesn't want to train!
  5. by   All4NursingRN
    Oh my what a Pandora's box I have opened.

    Then I wonder what if no one on a unit wants to precept and this I ask speaking from experience.

    Two years ago every nurse the manager approached refused to precept so she had to mandate someone... oh boy what do you think of that then?

    Well I'm thankful for those who precepted me way back when, whether they felt like it or not at least they were professional enough not to let it show and exercise patience and I'm sure with me under their wing it wasn't that bad at all (as that I was released from orientation early as a new grad working trauma, yes I am bragging)

    It's just precepting it isn't the end of your nursing career, I'm sure most of you aren't approached to precept a new nurse every 6 weeks like my current job (our turnover is horrendous) and goodness $1/hr extra for precepting, what a joke!
  6. by   kbrn2002
    I just wish our current staffing would allow for an actual preceptor. We have been pairing a new orientee with a nurse that has been employed for less than 3 months because she was the only nurse scheduled that day that regularly works the shift. She's good, but she's new herself. We have a few experienced nurses that have a less than positive attitude, the only thing a new orientee gets from them is a bunch of complaining while the orientee does all the work. Now I'm all for hands on learning, but that shouldn't mean the orientee works while the training nurse watches, complains about work and gossips about other staff.

    Sigh, now I'm off to work myself so everybody have a great day!
  7. by   NuGuyNurse2b
    Quote from getoverit
    You're entitled to your opinion and I'm entitled to think you're wrong
    Feel free to do so, but based on the comments responding to your posts, it would seem you're in the minority.
  8. by   smartassmommy
    Is it wrong to pray that whoever gets stuck with me when I start my first new grad job in a couple of weeks likes having the newbie underfoot?
    How can I be a good orientee? I want to get off to a good start learning how to be a nurse.
    Last edit by smartassmommy on Dec 10, '17 : Reason: Wasn't finished
  9. by   AutumnApple
    Quote from All4NursingRN
    Oh my what a Pandora's box I have opened.

    Then I wonder what if no one on a unit wants to precept and this I ask speaking from experience.

    Two years ago every nurse the manager approached refused to precept so she had to mandate someone... oh boy what do you think of that then?

    Well I'm thankful for those who precepted me way back when, whether they felt like it or not at least they were professional enough not to let it show and exercise patience and I'm sure with me under their wing it wasn't that bad at all (as that I was released from orientation early as a new grad working trauma, yes I am bragging)

    It's just precepting it isn't the end of your nursing career, I'm sure most of you aren't approached to precept a new nurse every 6 weeks like my current job (our turnover is horrendous) and goodness $1/hr extra for precepting, what a joke!
    Hmph, like I said before: Not liking to precept and outright refusing to are completely different things.

    If, as you said, "every nurse the manager approached refused", then what needs improvement is the managers approach, not the nurses viewpoint of precepting. A manager who lets insubordination become common practice can expect to have trouble finding preceptors (among other things).
  10. by   jodispamodi
    we have a nurse or two, or three (ok I'll stop counting) like that on our unit, I personally think it comes down to 3 things. 1. perceived job security (if I dont share my knowledge, no one can ever take my job), 2. laziness- they have their day planned, want to get out on time, and a preceptee will slow them down/create more work for them 3. insecurity, I know many seasoned nurses who won't precept because they feel they don't know "everything", their usually the ocd type.
  11. by   RJ 55
    I think that if a staff nurse has communicated that they have no interest in teaching or precepting new nurses on the unit they should not be given that responsibility. It sets up the newer nurses up for failure. I have precepted many new nurses in the course of my career. I enjoy teaching. I find it challenging and rewarding. Also, I work in the Emergency department and in Trauma resuscitation. I think that this type of nursing depends heavily on teamwork. When I am teaching someone, I am making the team stronger and better. It improves our patient outcomes and frankly makes everyone's job easier when we are all proficient and confident in our skill level. I love my job. I found there are a few things though that you can't teach people. This are personal characteristics such as integrity, empathy, grit and respect. It's much easier to teach skills and develop critical thinking skills than instill these characteristics. Most of my preceptees have gone on and been successful but some have not. Preceptees must take ownership for their learning and be able to accept constructive criticism. I have run across a few that are only it for the paycheck. To them my response is there are much easier ways to earn a paycheck. There have been some that leave the department and even nursing because they realize that their expectation and the reality of nursing does not match. I have met wonderful nurses that I would trust with the life of my loved ones not want to teach new nurses. I think that it is admirable to voice that you would not be an effective teacher than take on a role that you know you would not do well in. Looking back when in was a new grad I wish some of my precepters would have spoke up and said they didn't want to be in that role. I had a very inconsistent and negative experience. I was hazed and mocked. I was put in situations that were dangerous just to see if I would drown or if I could handle it. I would cry on my way to work and on my way home. I made it through but I cannot say that I am a better nurse because of it. It took a more experienced nurse (who was not assigned as my preceptor) to show me kindness and the ropes and tell me that although I had a lot to learn, I was on the right track. I vowed to be that beacon of light when I was in a position to. We have to stop hazing and thinking that it is ok for nurses to eat their young. It is definitely not ok. It's not good for anyone, especially the patients that we are caring for. Our patients' lives depend on it.
  12. by   getoverit
    Quote from NuGuyNurse2b
    Feel free to do so, but based on the comments responding to your posts, it would seem you're in the minority.
    Oh no!!!! This makes me re-think everything!! It must feel good being in the "majority" (of people responding)
  13. by   NuGuyNurse2b
    Quote from getoverit
    Oh no!!!! This makes me re-think everything!! It must feel good being in the "majority" (of people responding)
    Good. I'm not sure when this turned into you being petty about people disagreeing with your comments, but good for you.

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