So sick of this Nurses eat the young crap. - page 3

Every time I log on here see such a thread. Well let me see. My hospital has recently decided to hire only new grads or people who were new grads and worked in nursing homes etc. I have been amazed... Read More

  1. by   Red Kryptonite
    Quote from prnqday
    And I'm sick of people complaining about others complaining about NETY. Don't read NETY threads if it bothers you so much.
    Okay this one just has my head spinning....
  2. by   Nibbles1
    So in retail it's called "being catty" or cattiness. In business, it's called "stepping on toes" and in nursing, it's called NETY. Oh yeah, in engineering which is what i previously did it's called the " Boys club." This type of behavior is in every.single.profession.
  3. by   Tenebrae
    My first boss in district nursing was brilliant. She was an excellent teacher, more than happy to share her knowledge and encourage me to move beyond my comfort zone in terms of completing proceedures that I would have never thought I would ever be capable of, as a new nurse or even 5 years down the track after I'd been doing some learning and growing.

    She wasnt afraid to kick my ass if it was needed however she always did it in such a way that I knew where I'd gone wrong and what I needed to do to ensure it didnt happen again.

    Something I learned. Constructive feedback is always specific. It will always show a person where they screwed up and what they can do to ensure the same mistake doesnt happen again.

    When feedback comes from a different motive (call it netyl, call it what ever the hell you like) it is always vague it leaves a person feeling hopeless and with no real way of learning from the experience and doing it differently the next time. I recall as a student when being bullied I decided to use the experience as a learning experience from which to grow. I asked the nurse something along the lines of "its obvious you feel i have alot of short comings. Can you give me areas you think I need to work on?". This nurse told me to go home and read up on 'nursing basics, just the basics". Left me wondering "does she mean, wound care, dressing, showering, medication......"

    It was a good learning experience.
  4. by   TriciaJ
    Yes, a good way to deal with any kind of criticism is to ask for more information. If the criticism is legitimate, the person won't have any trouble being specific and it will be a good learning situation. If it's just power-tripping, it puts the turd back in their pocket. They'll bumble and fumble with a lot of vagueness, then go and bother someone else.
  5. by   NewYorkerGirl
    Quote from Nibbles1
    So in retail it's called "being catty" or cattiness. In business, it's called "stepping on toes" and in nursing, it's called NETY. Oh yeah, in engineering which is what i previously did it's called the " Boys club." This type of behavior is in every.single.profession.
    I didn't see any attitude whatsoever in my last profession, public school teaching. A profession full of women, by the way, so I know the NETY attitude ain't from being female.
  6. by   Angeljho
    It's funny. I never heard of NETY before I stumbled across AN. I can't say I ever experienced such a problem. Backstabbing, on the other hand, is much more common in my experience. Nurses reporting one another for brownie points, sabotaging one another for recognition, acting friendly to a peer nurse but then bad mouthing that very same individual to others, embarrassing one another in front of MDs. Wooo, the list goes on.
  7. by   jadelpn
    OP, just an observation--

    Behind a whole bucket load of nurses who are thrown on units and have little idea on what they are supposed to be doing, how to do what they know they should be doing, and attempting to get other nurses to do what they could be doing....

    Is a highly paid nurse educator. What is it that he/she is doing?
  8. by   macawake
    Quote from Conqueror+
    Or try being a young middle eastern man and boarding a plane these days.
    That would be rather difficult since I'm a 6'1'' blonde female. I don't think that you can compare the effects of an inept recent graduate, or the ineptitude of an experienced nurse either for that matter, to the effects of terrorism.

    Acts of terrorism rocks the foundation a society. Human beings have a deep-seated need for order and security and this impels societies to establish conventions, laws and boundaries to regulate violent coercion. Attacking the defenseless through an act of terror dramatically amplifies that anxiety about security and leaves people feeling profoundly vulnerable. Terror works through psychological pressure and collective alarmism is an effective facilitator. It's a well known fact the psychological effect of terrorist attacks are out of proportion to its physical effects. Add to this a dollop of good old-fashioned xenophobia and you have the answer to why men of Middle Eastern origin in general face difficulties at airport security checkpoints.

    People new to any profession are likely to not be as fast, efficient and competent as an experienced member of that same profession. They can also make mistakes. This isn't unique to nursing. Whatever negative fallout comes from a recent graduate's mistake is a zero-sum game in the sense that a new physician mistakes have about the same effect as a new nurses'. I think that using a new nurse's mistake as an excuse to say that I (or you) look like an idiot, is playing the victim card. My patients seem to trust me and think that I'm competent regardless of the mistakes that are sometimes made by others.

    I'm not so much annoyed by these so called "NETY" threads, as I am fascinated. I'm trying to figure out what psychological mechanism is behind the strong reactions I
    see in some, whenever someone brings up the "NETY" phenomenon.
  9. by   SHGR
    The 2013 NCLEX changes increasing the focus on delegation have not done nursing any favors. There is a huge chunk of NCLEX preparation now focused on telling the nursing students who are about to graduate that they will be able to delegate- what they seem to be hearing is that they will delegate tasks and care to anyone and everyone!! Other RNs, LPNs, UAP. I had to clarify to a large number of students about to graduate that they can't just do this in the real world.

    I asked them how they would feel if another staff nurse started delegating to them, or if they were in a situation with LPNs in LTC where the RNs and LPNs each had a team of patients with full-on med passes and treatments and that they could NOT delegate to those LPNs! They were flabbergasted. ("that's not what the books say")

    So it seems to me that the new grads have been hearing this message and it has some unintended, long-reaching effects.
    Last edit by SHGR on Apr 4, '15
  10. by   Jules A
    NETY seems to slide off my back but the whole bullying culture thing we now have embraced as a society, not just in nursing, really irritates me. Once again a decent idea gets totally blown out of proportion in our politically correct society. Instead of attempting to address the cases where someone is truly bullied it now seems acceptable for anyone who is doesn't get their way to cry that they are bullied and I think it cheapens it for those few who truly have been bullied.
  11. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from NewYorkerGirl
    I didn't see any attitude whatsoever in my last profession, public school teaching. A profession full of women, by the way, so I know the NETY attitude ain't from being female.
    I work as a school nurse right now in the public school system and I think every profession has its small percentage of true bullying behavior. Almost all the people I work with are great but there are a few bad apples.

    What I personally don't like about NETY is the stereotyping of nurses. I'm not a fan of generalizing or stereotyping groups of people as you can see by my signature line.

    Quote from Jules A
    NETY seems to slide off my back but the whole bullying culture thing we now have embraced as a society, not just in nursing, really irritates me. Once again a decent idea gets totally blown out of proportion in our politically correct society. Instead of attempting to address the cases where someone is truly bullied it now seems acceptable for anyone who is doesn't get their way to cry that they are bullied and I think it cheapens it for those few who truly have been bullied.
    One of my biggest frustrations working in public school is Zero Tolerance for what used to be normal behavior. Kids get in trouble all the time for silly stuff, get pulled out of class, have to miss instruction time sitting outside the principal's office waiting to be berated for just being a kid.

    Maybe Zero Tolerance has creeped into most professions now. What used to be seen as constructive criticism from more experienced nurses is now seen as "eating their young" or "bullying".

    I'm simply frustrated that anyone would put down nurses, in general, with the NETY idea. It has bothered me since I started here on AN.
  12. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from Spidey's mom

    Maybe Zero Tolerance has creeped into most professions now. What used to be seen as constructive criticism from more experienced nurses is now seen as "eating their young" or "bullying".
    I think there is some truth to this. And I think that its important to recognize that this is a SYSTEMS problem, moreso than a personal shortcoming as a human being of any individual nurse. Students in the millenial generation are taught different things about delegation (as a previous poster mentioned), about how to be a coworker, and about how to handle "bullying" AKA criticism.

    Perhaps a recognition of this would help ease some tension. I think the millenial generation often feels attacked on a personal level (which is also due to the way they were raised, in part at least) by the frustration of the nurses who have come before (whether its intended or not).
  13. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Janey496
    I think there is some truth to this. And I think that its important to recognize that this is a SYSTEMS problem, moreso than a personal shortcoming as a human being of any individual nurse. Students in the millenial generation are taught different things about delegation (as a previous poster mentioned), about how to be a coworker, and about how to handle "bullying" AKA criticism.

    Perhaps a recognition of this would help ease some tension. I think the millenial generation often feels attacked on a personal level (which is also due to the way they were raised, in part at least) by the frustration of the nurses who have come before (whether its intended or not).

    I have to say I see this as the school nurse. I like to walk around the cafeteria at the elementary school because I love the kids but the truth is they are programmed to think every little bit of teasing behavior is bullying. I don't write up bullying referrals but I see the yard duty aides doing it all the time. Or sending the kids over to the wall to sit out recess because of some minor issue that could have been solved with some conversation.

    I think we are making kids think they are always the victim.

    Instead of teaching them to stand up for themselves.

    Two recent examples - one 3rd grade child took off the baseball cap of the student in front of him and turned it backwards and put it back on. Very gently. Bullying referral instead of talking to the student about not doing that again.

    A second grader I love joking with told me "Look, there is water dripping from the ceiling!". I looked and she said "Made you look!" . I laughed and said "You got me". An aide walked by shortly after and the student did the same thing to her and the aide got really mad, put her finger in the child's face and said "That wasn't nice and I'll never trust you again".

    What are we teaching our kids when we have Zero Tolerance for silly behavior or Zero Tolerance for constructive criticism?

    I guess that's another thread though . . .

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