SNOTTY MA claiming to be a nurse!!!! - page 6

:angryfire i had to take my 11 month old to the immediate care. he has chicken pox. the ma is talking and my 4 year old asks if her brother is going to get a shot. the ma says, "no, he won't get a... Read More

  1. by   Koyaanisqatsi-RN
    I guess I'm the only one who thinks that there is either no way a four year old would ever say that, word for word as written, or you have more or less indoctrinated a child as to office politics at a hospital.

    Don't kill me, just my opinion.
  2. by   BookwormRN
    Quote from libnat
    nope, i'm doing it now. something being more difficult doesn't make your title sacrosanct. nurse is a pretty general term for caregiver, i know a lot of people who call aids and anyone in scrubs "nurse". like i said, seems like a petty thing to worry about.
    i usually don't allow myself to comment on these types of threads, as i don't like to add to the conflict. however, after reading this quote, i must comment.

    "nurse" is not a general term for a caregiver when used in the professional setting (hospital, ltc facility, clinic, etc). i am a registered nurse. i am the person who coordinates the care for my patients. i have cnas to assist me; pt/ot/st, radiology, lab-all of these disciplines also work with my patients. but when it all hits the fan-my butt is the one on the line. i am responsible for that patient!

    no, it is not a petty thing to worry about. i correct patients when they call the cna "nurse" and i tell the cna the same thing. all rns in our facility now wear badges that say "rn" in big white letters on a red background...this helps everyone to easily identify the nurse, because as you said, it is hard to distinguish with everyone from nursing to dietary to housekeeping wearing scrubs.

    you say you're in school now. please don't take your role as a nurse lightly. it is your license to earn, but it is also your license to lose. you will think differently when you are the one responsible. it has nothing to do with difficulty, and everything to do with your responsibilities and scope of practice.
  3. by   libnat
    your view of "nurse" and the general publics is different then.

    no, it is not a petty thing to worry about. i correct patients when they call the cna "nurse" and i tell the cna the same thing.
    we disagree, i would hate to have a snotty nurse who spent her time worrying about correcting patients who may have called a nurse aid, nurse and was on my back to make sure i corrected them every time.

    titles, and symbols, i don't get the attachment.

    it's like professor who have doctorates demanding you call them dr. instead of professor. someone’s awful proud of themselves.
  4. by   libnat
    Now someone has said misrepresenting yourself as a nurse is illegal. I think you will find that law mainly applies to practicing as a rn/lpn and trying to ger hired as an rn/lpn but if you think you can find someone to prosecute an ma saying nurse as she takes a history or whatever from a young child, be my guest.
  5. by   whatchamacallits
    libnat, I see that you are a "pre-nursing student", if you get into a nursing program you will likely be taught right off the bat the importance of the title of RN or LPN and exactly why it is not only illegal but dangerous to misrepresent yourself.

    Good luck in school...
  6. by   Katnip
    Quote from libnat
    your view of "nurse" and the general publics is different then.


    we disagree, i would hate to have a snotty nurse who spent her time worrying about correcting patients who may have called a nurse aid, nurse and was on my back to make sure i corrected them every time.

    titles, and symbols, i don't get the attachment.

    it's like professor who have doctorates demanding you call them dr. instead of professor. someone's awful proud of themselves.
    there have been cases where cnas and other non-licensed personnel have given advice to patients and the patient died or suffered other harm because of it. one case that comes to mind happened several years ago in pa when a patient in metabolic alkylosis was complaining of stomach upset. the aide who led the patient to believe she was a nurse, told the patient to take pepto, which she provided. the patient died.

    it is not a petty difference when a patient doesn't know who is the nurse and who is not.

    and the general public doesn't always see nurses in the correct role in part, because they think anyone in scrubs is a nurse, and those people don't have the education a nurse does.

    people have to trust in the person who is taking care of them, and that means presenting onself accurately as far as professional title.

    in most states because of this, the title "nurse" is a legally protected one and anyone stating they are had better have that license to prove it. otherwise that person may be facing legal charges.
  7. by   BookwormRN
    Quote from libnat
    your view of "nurse" and the general publics is different then.


    we disagree, i would hate to have a snotty nurse who spent her time worrying about correcting patients who may have called a nurse aid, nurse and was on my back to make sure i corrected them every time.

    titles, and symbols, i don't get the attachment.

    it's like professor who have doctorates demanding you call them dr. instead of professor. someone's awful proud of themselves.

    no, i am not a "snotty" nurse. i am a nurse who studied hard to be where i am. we, as nurses are to be patient advocates and educators. i am not rubbing my "title" in-i am letting my patients know who is responsible for them on a particular shift; who will be administering their medications and assessing them; who will be talking with their family about their care; who will be calling the md if there is a change in condition. being a registered nurse is a very big responsibility (am i repeating myself here?) and i take it seriously.

    as far as the general public is concerned, it is up to us to educate them about our role as registered nurse. yes, my family members tried to "nurse" my dad back to good health when he was dying of cancer. but not one of them to this day assumes that they can step into my shoes at the hospital and be a nurse. (the word may be used as both a noun and a verb.)

    perhaps you do not see the importance of the "rn" after my name: however, for the sake of my patients and their well-being, i do.
  8. by   flightnurse2b
    Quote from libnat
    Now someone has said misrepresenting yourself as a nurse is illegal. I think you will find that law mainly applies to practicing as a rn/lpn and trying to ger hired as an rn/lpn but if you think you can find someone to prosecute an ma saying nurse as she takes a history or whatever from a young child, be my guest.
    you are incorrect. it is illegal in almost all 50 states to call yourself a nurse when you are not a licensed nurse. nurse is a protected term. that's why there is a "badge law" in place... to protect the public so they know the person taking care of them as well as their credentials. my original state of licensure is NC, so here's a the law there regarding this in that state:

    BADGE LAW
    GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF NORTH CAROLINA
    AN ACT TO PROTECT PATIENTS’ RIGHTS BY REQUIRING NAME BADGES OR OTHER IDENTIFICATION FOR HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS
    Medicine and Allied Occupations - Health Care Practitioner Identification.
    G.S. 90-640 reads as written:
    90-640. Identification badges required.
    (a) For purposes of this section, "health care practitioner" means an individual who is licensed, certified, or registered to engage in the practice of medicine, nursing, dentistry, pharmacy, or any related occupation involving the direct provision of health care to patients.
    (b) When providing health care to a patient, a health care practitioner shall wear a badge or other form of identification displaying in readily visible type the individual's name and the license, certification, or registration held by the practitioner. If the identity of the individual's license, certification, or registration is commonly expressed by an abbreviation rather than by full title, that abbreviation may be used on the badge or other identification.
    (c) The badge or other form of identification is not required to be worn if the patient is being seen in the health care practitioner's office and, the name and license of the practitioner can be readily determined by the patient from a posted license, a sign in the office, a brochure provided to patients, or otherwise.
    (d) Each licensing board or other regulatory authority for health care practitioners may adopt rules for exemptions from wearing a badge or other form of identification, or for allowing use of the practitioner's first name only, when necessary for the health care practitioner's safety or for therapeutic concerns.
    (e) Violation of this section is a ground for disciplinary action against the health care practitioner by the practitioner's licensing board or other regulatory authority. (1999-320, s. 1.)
    Medicine and Allied Occupations – License required.

    G.S. 90-171.43 reads as written:
    90-171.43. License required.
    No person shall practice or offer to practice as a registered nurse or licensed practical nurse, or use the word "nurse" as a title for herself or himself, or use an abbreviation to indicate that the person is a registered nurse or licensed practical nurse, unless the person is currently licensed as a registered nurse or licensed practical nurse as provided by this Article. If the word "nurse" is part of a longer title, such as "nurse's aide", a person who is entitled to use that title shall use the entire title and may not abbreviate the title to "nurse". This Article shall not, however, be construed to prohibit or limit the following:

    (1) The performance by any person of any act for which that person holds a license issued pursuant to North Carolina law;

    (2) The clinical practice by students enrolled in approved nursing programs, continuing education programs, or refresher courses under the supervision of qualified faculty;

    (3) The performance of nursing performed by persons who hold a temporary license issued pursuant to G.S. 90-171.33;

    (4) The delegation to any person, including a member of the patient's family, by a physician licensed to practice medicine in North Carolina, a licensed dentist or registered nurse of those patient-care services which are routine, repetitive, limited in scope that do not require the professional judgment of a registered nurse or licensed practical nurse;

    (5) Assistance by any person in the case of emergency.
    Any person permitted to practice nursing without a license as provided in subdivision (2) or (3) of this section shall be held to the same standard of care as any licensed nurse.
    August 1999
  9. by   XB9S
    I'm going to close the thread for a cooling off period and review.

close