Should I tell the hiring manager??

  1. Hi all nurses.com!! I have a question... I have an interview on a VERY BUSY med-surg unit in a few days. I really need this job. Recently, I was diagnosed as diabetic. Good news is, the doctor says at this point it is mild and can be controlled with diet and exercise. I am on NO medication for it at this stage. HOWEVER, I have to eat a little something every few hours to keep the glucose levels stable. I tend to get hypoglycemic with it. I don't have to sit down, just need like 5 minutes or so to scarf down my nutrient bar or a yogert.

    This unit is INSANELY BUSY. I have shadowed on it and the RN I was with, NEVER took a break for the 8 plus hours I was there. I finally had to ask if I could have a second to wolf a sandwich down.

    Here is the question.... do I need to tell the RN unit manager in my interview that I am diabetic and need to eat every few hours?? I am fine as long as I eat a little something, but if I don't I get "whirly-bird" and feel like I am going to go PLOP! I don't have to sit down, just need like 5 minutes or so to scarf down something. Should I say anything?? I don't want to alarm her and I really need the job, BUT I do need to have time throughout the shift to grab a snack every once in a while (I was not diabetic in nursing school... this is something that was recently discovered).

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    About Epona

    Joined: Mar '06; Posts: 796; Likes: 142
    Nursing student

    12 Comments

  3. by   rn4ever?
    I don't think that the interview is the best time to mention that to her. Wait until you are officially employed in that facility.
  4. by   BULLYDAWGRN
    as long as you think you can do the job then give it a try and not worry about it. i work with diabetic nurses in the er and yes there has been times when they arent at their best, but i for one appreciate their effort even when they are draggin. try to find other diabetic nurses and find out any tricks they use to keep them going. good luck.
  5. by   gr8rnpjt
    Quote from rn4ever?
    I don't think that the interview is the best time to mention that to her. Wait until you are officially employed in that facility.
    Cosigned. No need to say anything before you get the job. In fact, saying something ahead of time could make you appear "fussy", or "needy". When you start work, let your preceptor and manager know what your requirements are to maintain glycemic control. You are certainly not the first diabetic nurse for sure. Don't make a bigger deal of this than you have to.

    By the way, what meter do you like? I am always looking for better meters for my ex husband. He hates something about every meter he has had!!!
  6. by   ky_grl82
    Tell her after you're hired. It may be a little to easy too discriminate against you for this and not get the job because of it, though obviously illegal.

    Side note: Aren't there laws mandiating that workers have breaks esp. for lunch? I thought the labor board was pretty strict on that type of stuff. I am not a nurse (just starting nursing school soon) but I would still think that breaks for nurses would be very important and the labor board would be stricter on this.
  7. by   Epona
    Thanks everyone for all the great tips. I will use them and WAIT until after I am offered the job! Thanks!

    As far as the meter I use, I was using one to monitor it for a while when the doc. made the diagnosis. I don't recall the name of it. I averaged around 135. Typically when I wake it is around 110. I have clocked it at 96 before YAHOO and the highest was 145 after birthday cake and pizza! I do not use the meter regularly at this point. My doc. has not instructed me to do so at this time.

    I am pretty good at monitoring the 'swings' I get with the sugar highs and lows. I am eating foods, snacks higher in protein and lower in sugar and carbs. I eat every few hours to avoid the dips. I am walking everyday now AND have lost some weight! Hooray! I try hard now to watch and do what I am supposed to do. I don't want to go on meds. and insulin. The doc. thinks I can prevent it from getting worse by taking action now.

    We nurses are supposed to be role models you know!

    Thanks everyone! :redpinkhe
  8. by   Turtle in scrubs
    Although not diabetic I get a bit woozy and thick headed if I don't have something to eat every few hours. I usually don't get a lunch so small & quick works best. It is a challenge but I've become an expert on snacks that can be shoveled in quickly... no refrigeration, no heating, no spoons... lol... it's absurd, but true. I agree with the others- this is not something to mention in your interview. Even afterwards the less you make of it the better... but do take care of yourself.

    All the best in your interview!
  9. by   lkwashington
    While on the floor just keep some candy in your pocket such as pepperment, tic tacs, and/or lifesavers. Things that are small and you just pop in your mouth. Take a quick break a drink a oj every now and then. I do agree with everyone about waiting until you get a job. Use are advice you may not have any problems. Just a thought.
  10. by   AnaCatRN
    Quote from ky_grl82
    Tell her after you're hired. It may be a little to easy too discriminate against you for this and not get the job because of it, though obviously illegal.

    Side note: Aren't there laws mandiating that workers have breaks esp. for lunch? I thought the labor board was pretty strict on that type of stuff. I am not a nurse (just starting nursing school soon) but I would still think that breaks for nurses would be very important and the labor board would be stricter on this.
    Um, you're in for a shock , but no one seems to care about those pesky labor laws. You are definitely not guaranteed that you'll ever get a break, either to eat or to pee. I know we should fight and change it, but it seems to be just part of nursing. I did have one NM at one job who actually did insist that we take breaks, but that seems to be rare.
  11. by   P_RN
    I totally agree with not telling until you are actually hired. While it is illegal to discriminate, I was told I wasn't hired for a desk job telephoning insurance companies to precertify coverage before admission. Reason? I use a cane.
  12. by   ky_grl82
    Quote from AnaCatRN
    Um, you're in for a shock , but no one seems to care about those pesky labor laws. You are definitely not guaranteed that you'll ever get a break, either to eat or to pee. I know we should fight and change it, but it seems to be just part of nursing. I did have one NM at one job who actually did insist that we take breaks, but that seems to be rare.
    Oh, I know I am in for a lot of shocks! lol I guess the no-peeing, no-eating, no-sitting down for 8 to 12 hour shifts would be first on the labor law's list, but guess not. Sad that the people taking care of others is not being taken care of.
  13. by   dudette10
    Like others have said, tell her after you get hired. Or, better yet, just don't tell her, and go scarf down some food when you can feel yourself getting hypoglycemic.

    It just disgusts me that nursing seems to be one of the few jobs where eating and peeing/pooping can get you in trouble. What country are we in again?
  14. by   SASlong
    I would have to agree with all the other posters, I would not tell during the interview. I probably wouldn't tell even after I was hired. My teenage daughter is diabetic and we manage with diet and exercise. As a teenager, she doesn't like to be fussed over and certainly doesn't want her friends to know about her condition. Her teachers know and the office at school is aware of it in case of emergency. Keep handy snacks that you can eat on the go. Always have the emergency glucose tablets and you will be fine. Over time, you will be able to tell when you need to eat something and quick. Simply take a quick bathroom break, cram a snack and keep it moving. Good luck on the interview!

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