shift differentials not as common as i thought? - page 2

I am somewhat confused about my hiring pay rate. I am a LPN who just finished my program this spring. This coming fall I start the RN year. I have a bachelor's degree already in a non-nursing field.... Read More

  1. by   lalalalexi
    Quote from meluhn
    I could be wrong but I thought there was some law about working below what your license qualifies you to do. When I got my RN license I still had an LPN license but could not work as an LPN or so I was told (I never actually tried to). For a short time I was licensed as both until I let the LPN license lapse. Why not just get a job as an LPN? It will take a couple of years at least to get the RN, are you willing to work as a cna all that time?

    PS, No offense but shouldnt you have gotten this straight before you took the job?
    There is no law keeping me from being a CNA since I have my CNA certificate. If I were just a LPN, there might be a problem. I also know RNs who are currently working as LPNs. Maybe where you live has something to do with it, I don't know. Anyway, as far as getting everything straightened out before I accepted the position, I am not about to be confrontational as a new hire in this economy. I was wondering how shift differentials worked at other places and what people's opinions are, but no matter what I still am happy with being hired. I know people all over who would love a job right now and I feel fortunate that I found one at all. Also, this is the hospital (and unit) where I hope to be employed as a RN, so working in a nursing home or doing home care as a LPN, to me, just isn't going to give me the same "leg up" and experience.

    Also, I will only be working two shifts a week and I will graduate with a RN degree nine months from now so it's not like I'm going to kill myself doing this or have serious regrets. Other girls from my class last year are keeping their jobs as unit clerks and techs through the RN year too so I know I'm not the only one.

    Anyway, thanks to everyone who posted some helpful info about shift differentials. I feel like I understand what's going on more.
  2. by   barefootlady
    Good luck in your new position. You might find you are going to be expected to work up to an LPN level once you are on the job. I mean if they know you have the license, they might expect you to do treatments an LPN would do but a CNA cannot. This happened to a friend of mine years ago. She kept the job for some experience and then moved on to an LPN job for more money.
  3. by   kcochrane
    Quote from meluhn
    I could be wrong but I thought there was some law about working below what your license qualifies you to do. When I got my RN license I still had an LPN license but could not work as an LPN or so I was told (I never actually tried to). For a short time I was licensed as both until I let the LPN license lapse. Why not just get a job as an LPN? It will take a couple of years at least to get the RN, are you willing to work as a cna all that time?

    PS, No offense but shouldnt you have gotten this straight before you took the job?
    It depends on the state. In NYS you have to work under the license/certification you are hired at. If you are hired as a CNA, that is the scope you must practice under. I know a few RNs that still have their LPNs...mosttly for choices. It is best to check with the BON for that state for the specifics. One state (I think WA) is the same, you must practice within the scope of practice of the job title you are hired under...BUT if YOU decide to go beyond that scope, you are then held to a that higher level.
  4. by   rjflyn
    My comment was not necessarily pointed at how the board or the employer would hold you, but if you had something bad happen, what standard you might be held to in court. Do a search on this very forum, there are multiple post on this very thing. Yeah you were hired as a CNA, practicing as a CNA but hey you have a LPN license so guess what you should know better and any good lawyer going to make a point of that.
  5. by   JomoNurse
    new hires at my hospital get $32 an hour for days, $37 for nights. If your nights and working the weekend, the differential for new grads is $44 an hour
  6. by   kcochrane
    Quote from rjflyn
    My comment was not necessarily pointed at how the board or the employer would hold you, but if you had something bad happen, what standard you might be held to in court. Do a search on this very forum, there are multiple post on this very thing. Yeah you were hired as a CNA, practicing as a CNA but hey you have a LPN license so guess what you should know better and any good lawyer going to make a point of that.
    I got that... I was looking at legalities also. The fact is that you can be sued for anything. Whether or not they can win or have a case is another. If you are following state protocols, that is as safe as you can be. None of us are totally safe in this sue society. Doing patient care, a CNA that is a LPN can still work safely as long as they use their common sense. Personally I wouldn't work as a CNA if I had my LPN license, just because of the difference in pay and back breaking work. But I do plan on keeping my LPN license once I get my RN - just in case.

    Let me give you a good one that could really get a LPN in trouble...and I've heard it more than once on my unit. On days many times a LPN will pull a CNA assignment because we have too many nurses and not enough CNAs. Many of the residents have dressings or treatments. This is the statement I hear. "I'm working as a CNA today, so I am a CNA, not a LPN." Actually not. You were hired as a LPN, you are doing patient care, which is part of being a nurse, you are still a LPN. THAT situation will get them sued.
  7. by   rjflyn
    Yeah I know i kept my LPN for the year I had both RN and LPN but when the PN came up for renewal it wasnt and expense I wanted to pay at that time. I think it was $50 every 2 yrs.

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