RN and BSN difference??

  1. Just curious, what is the difference in job opportunities between an RN and BSN? What can a BSN do that an RN can't do and is there a big difference in pay? I was just curious to see if I want to pursue a BSN degree or quit after a RN degree. Any info would be appreciated.
    •  
  2. Visit dixiechickn71 profile page

    About dixiechickn71

    Joined: Mar '06; Posts: 10

    11 Comments

  3. by   sunnyjohn
    A BSN is a graduate with a Bachelor's degree from a four year college or a college that has the last 2 years of a tertiary education program. After passing the NCLEX the BSN graduate is considered an RN.

    Graduates from community college or any two-year college obtain an Associates degree commonly called and ADN (Associate Degree in Nursing), but may also be called and ASN (Associate of Science in Nursing) or AAS (Associate of Applied Science in Nursing). The graduate of these programs may also sit the NCLEX exam and if they pass are considered an RN.

    All graduates of the BSN, ADN/ASN/ AAS (or the new directy-enty Master's programs for second degree candidates) take the same NCLEX licensing exam. These new graduates with new licenses usually have the same level of experience. Most hospitals will offer the exact same wage, responsiblities and opportunities for specialty training to these new nurses, irregardless of degree.

    Some hospitals do offer additional compensation to the new BSN nurse in the form of higher starting wages, anywhere from 0.25c to a few dollars/hr). Some hospitals do express a preference for BSN-RN's but will still hire ADN-RN's for the same positions. A few hospitals wil reserve internships for new BSN-RN's but a request by an ADN-RN may open one of these spots.

    Traditional thinking is that a BSN-RN nurse may find it easier to quickly advance into management positions. While a BSN -RN is often required for nursing mangement, many ADN-RN nurses hold mangement positions.

    If you are very young, a recent high school graduate with no responsiblities other than to yourself, the BSN may be a good choice. If your plan do include graduate study getting the BSN as the first degee may not be a bad idea. Still with the proliferation of BSN completion programs and tuition reimbursement plans by hospitals, the ADN-RN has many options. New ADN-RN to MSN-RN programs exist along with BSN-RN to MSN-RN programs.


    Msot pre-nursing students find that the choice of program usually comes down to personal choice, availability, time, money, locality and personal obligations. No matter what degree you get you'll still be considered and RN and should ALWAYS be looking for advanced training opportunities and education to enhace your career and further the outlook of the nursing profession.

    Choose the program that best fits your present situation and future goals.
    Last edit by sunnyjohn on May 13, '06
  4. by   Katnip
    First, you mean ADN and BSN. RN is a licensing designation, not a degree.\

    If you ever get the desire to obtain a Master's degree to become an NP, CRNA, or other advanced practice nurse, you will need a BSN.

    There is usually little or no difference in pay between the two degrees.

    Usually, if you want to move up into management positions, a BSN is required.

    And I have seen a few situations where all else being equal the BSN was the preferred candidate in hiring. But with the shortage in most places, that is very rare.
  5. by   dixiechickn71
    Thanks you guys...this helped me out alot. I am 34 and completed 1 semester of the nursing program only 3 more to go. I have no idea if I want a management position or not....I guess I'll just play it by ear.
  6. by   TopherSRN
    Even if you don't know if you want to pursue a master's then if you're able you're better off with a BSN. It might be more difficult to go back later should you change your mind.
  7. by   Faeriewand
    Great reply sunnyjohn. I learned a lot!

    Good luck in your studies dixie :studyowl:
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from dixiechickn71
    Thanks you guys...this helped me out alot. I am 34 and completed 1 semester of the nursing program only 3 more to go. I have no idea if I want a management position or not....I guess I'll just play it by ear.

    There are a lot RN to BSN programs. I recieved my associates degree 15 years ago and am going part-time to finish up, and it's 100% online. I'm getting tuition reimbursement from my hospital.

    As was stated the BSN becomes advantages later on. Both ADN's and BSN's usually start out on equal footing, doing the same thing, making the same amount of money at the bedside.

    Besides management, BSNs might be preferred in teaching, research with a pharmaceutical company (drug testing that needs RN monitoring), public and community health and other areas.

    Say you graduate with an ADN when your 37 or 38 years old. You might have another good 25 years to work. Whose to say 20 years from now you might not want to get a position out of the hospital out of the bedside. Here is when the BSN pays off. That's why I'm doing it because I'm not sure I can do what I'm doing when I'm older. The BSN I hope will provide me opportunities.

    Good luck in whatever you do.
    Last edit by Tweety on May 13, '06
  9. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from Tweety
    There are a lot RN to BSN programs. I recieved my associates degree 15 years ago and am going part-time to finish up, and it's 100% online. I'm getting tuition reimbursement from my hospital.

    As was stated the BSN becomes advantages later on. Both ADN's and BSN's usually start out on equal footing, doing the same thing, making the same amount of money at the bedside.

    Besides management, BSNs might be preferred in teaching, research with a pharmaceutical company (drug testing that needs RN monitoring), public and community health and other areas.

    Say you graduate with an ADN when your 37 or 38 years old. You might have another good 25 years to work. Whose to say 20 years from now you might not want to get a position out of the hospital out of the bedside. Here is when the BSN pays off. That's why I'm doing it because I'm not sure I can do what I'm doing when I'm older. The BSN I hope will provide me opportunities.

    Good luck in whatever you do.
    :yeahthat: ... excellent post, Tweety! I was 35 yrs old when I graduated from AAS in Surg Tech, 38 yrs old when I graduated from AAS in Nursing [ADN], and 43 yrs old when I completed RN-BSN program.
  10. by   Tweety
    Quote from Corvette Guy
    :yeahthat: ... excellent post, Tweety! I was 35 yrs old when I graduated from AAS in Surg Tech, 38 yrs old when I graduated from AAS in Nursing [ADN], and 43 yrs old when I completed RN-BSN program.
    Awesome. At least you did it in 8 years. I've been at it 15.
  11. by   penguin2
    I went to a university that offered the ADN to BSN program- (2+2) after 2 yrs they granted you the ADN, then you went on to complete the BSN, with more clinicals. Some stopped after 2 yrs, some went on. In my case, I completed 3 yrs, ran short of funds, so then started working & stopped going to college, got married, had 3 kids.... it took me YEARS to finish that last year & I did it for self satisfaction, since I was already in a managerial position w/top pay. You are much better off to get it all out of the way, if you can, NOW. Good luck!
  12. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from Tweety
    Awesome. At least you did it in 8 years. I've been at it 15.
    BTW, I first started to college in 1993 & got my AAS in Surg Tech in 1995. Seems like school never stops. I started an online Essentials in Critical Care Orientation course last Jan. that I completed under 90 days. Last month I started the in resident 14 week Critical Care Nurse Course.

    I renewed my ACLS this morning, then tomorrow its back to studying for my next CCNC exam that will be this Tuesday.

  13. by   Tweety
    Quote from Corvette Guy
    BTW, I first started to college in 1993 & got my AAS in Surg Tech in 1995. Seems like school never stops. I started an online Essentials in Critical Care Orientation course last Jan. that I completed under 90 days. Last month I started the in resident 14 week Critical Care Nurse Course.

    I renewed my ACLS this morning, then tomorrow its back to studying for my next CCNC exam that will be this Tuesday.


    You're right. I've done similar things, got certified, ACLS, progressive care courses, on and on and on.

close