Resume after quitting.

  1. I recently quit my first LPN job at a LTC facility due to unsafe work conditions. If you'd like to read the whole story, please refer to my prior posts. There were so many things that added up to my decision to quit, but ultimately, the management, staffing coordinator, and the DON were the main reason why I ended up leaving the job.

    I contemplated leaving the job within my first week while I was orienting, because I found myself almost in tears daily because of the sheer lack of support and guidance from other nurses and the staff. The nurses that were meant to be teaching me would leave me to complete their med pass, in order to take hour long smoke breaks or to chat with people.

    On day two of my orientation, the nurse left work and went home early, because she was tired and didn't feel like staying for her full shift. The nurse did so with the permission of the staffing coordinator, and I was left by myself to complete her med pass. I ended up staying with the facility for 2 months, mostly because I forced myself to stick it out for the sake of it being my first nursing job. My decision to quit was not one that was made lightly, I thought it over for weeks, before I finally hit a breaking point with the DON.

    I turned down 4 other job interviews because I had been offered this job, but after quitting, I'm not sure how to go forward. My question is, should I update my resume to reflect this job? I would like to start applying for other positions, but I'm unsure as to whether I should list this under my job history. I don't want to put other job opportunities in jeopardy by listing this job. I may have hated every second of my 2 months at the facility, but I strived to always do my best for the sake of the residents. Knowing the vindictive character of the DON, I have no doubt that if a potential employer were to call and ask about my 2 months at the facility, she'd have no problem smearing my name.

    I figure that if I was able to get 5 call backs for interviews with my current resume, then maybe I don't need to list this job. Thoughts?
  2. Visit Quinnbee profile page

    About Quinnbee

    Joined: Aug '16; Posts: 10; Likes: 13

    11 Comments

  3. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Quinnbee
    I recently quit my first LPN job at a LTC facility due to unsafe work conditions. If you'd like to read the whole story, please refer to my prior posts. There were so many things that added up to my decision to quit, but ultimately, the management, staffing coordinator, and the DON were the main reason why I ended up leaving the job.

    I contemplated leaving the job within my first week while I was orienting, because I found myself almost in tears daily because of the sheer lack of support and guidance from other nurses and the staff. The nurses that were meant to be teaching me would leave me to complete their med pass, in order to take hour long smoke breaks or to chat with people.

    On day two of my orientation, the nurse left work and went home early, because she was tired and didn't feel like staying for her full shift. The nurse did so with the permission of the staffing coordinator, and I was left by myself to complete her med pass. I ended up staying with the facility for 2 months, mostly because I forced myself to stick it out for the sake of it being my first nursing job. My decision to quit was not one that was made lightly, I thought it over for weeks, before I finally hit a breaking point with the DON.

    I turned down 4 other job interviews because I had been offered this job, but after quitting, I'm not sure how to go forward. My question is, should I update my resume to reflect this job? I would like to start applying for other positions, but I'm unsure as to whether I should list this under my job history. I don't want to put other job opportunities in jeopardy by listing this job. I may have hated every second of my 2 months at the facility, but I strived to always do my best for the sake of the residents. Knowing the vindictive character of the DON, I have no doubt that if a potential employer were to call and ask about my 2 months at the facility, she'd have no problem smearing my name.

    I figure that if I was able to get 5 call backs for interviews with my current resume, then maybe I don't need to list this job. Thoughts?
    I wouldn't add it to a resume, but you might be required to list all jobs held on the actual employment application. I'm not sure I'd risk lying about it (by omission), and I certainly wouldn't launch into a dramatic story about how horrible the place was. Think of a nice, generic response and use that to explain if you're asked.
    Hopefully, the rest of your work history is stable and will speak for you.
    Good luck.
  4. by   Lisacar130
    There is no national employment history background check... except for government jobs. Somehow the government can find this stuff out (if you omit a job). I guess the government has access to your tax records so that might be how they find out.
    But otherwise, unless it is a government job or a job with the same company (sometimes facilities merge or own other facilities) then I don't see any way they would ever find out. If it were me, it would be worth the risk to not include it. Even if they found out you omitted a job, the worst thing that could happen is you wouldn't get the job. Putting the job on your resume or application opens up a can of worms for the interview and makes you look like a risk to hire. You would most likely still be able to get some kind of job if you put it on there, it would just take you longer and you might not get your top choices. If you really think your old employer would talk bad about you for a reference check, that would also make things harder for you.
  5. by   TX.RN.Shannon
    But wasn't this your first nursing job? It may actually be easier to land an interview and get a job offer with that experience (however short it was) under your belt.
    If you don't list it, you'll have a few-months-long gap from graduation until now. How will you explain that?
    A manager may be willing to take a chance on you knowing you've at least had a little bit of time working as a nurse; versus presenting yourself as someone who has no experience and has never worked as a nurse.
    Plus, if you were to land a job--are you going to be able to act as if you are totally new and inexperienced? Will you be able to keep your mouth shut and pretend you know nothing?
    I understand your concerns about your previous job and horrible supervisors; however any halfway decent facility will give you a chance to present your side of the story. Even if your old DON speaks poorly of you, you could totally rock the interview and wow the interview.
    This is just my opinion and I see it is already going to be the more unpopular one. But I say to list the job and highlight all the skills you've already been exposed to (time management, delegation, medication management/administration, wound care, etc). Do not talk bad about the old job or management; just be succinct and say it wasn't a good fit or you're looking to broaden your experience.
    I will say a prayer for you or send good luck vibes; whatever you would prefer!
    Please keep me posted how things go, no matter what you decide to do.
  6. by   Quinnbee
    Thank you guys for the advice. In the two months that I was at the facility, I feel like I really strengthened a lot of my nursing skills, and I want to be able to put that forward if I am called for an interview. Like @TX.RN.Shannon said, I don't want to have to pick my words when I'm asked a question about my prior nursing experience. So for now, even though I'm apprehensive about the short length and the DON, I decided to put the job not on my resume, but in the applications, only if asked.
  7. by   Hoosier_RN
    Quote from Quinnbee
    Thank you guys for the advice. In the two months that I was at the facility, I feel like I really strengthened a lot of my nursing skills, and I want to be able to put that forward if I am called for an interview. Like @TX.RN.Shannon said, I don't want to have to pick my words when I'm asked a question about my prior nursing experience. So for now, even though I'm apprehensive about the short length and the DON, I decided to put the job not on my resume, but in the applications, only if asked.
    be careful about what you omit. Nursing is a very small world, very small...
  8. by   NuggetsHuman
    "I left because ultimately it wasn't a good match for me. I learned that I'm looking for a place where I can keep learning with a little more support from experienced nurses."

    maybe?
  9. by   djh123
    I only skimmed your post, but this really jumped out at me: "On day two of my orientation, the nurse left work and went home early, because she was tired and didn't feel like staying for her full shift. "

    Really? Seems like they could be charged with abandonment. And apparently they didn't even get in trouble with the DON or anyone else? I have to admit that while she didn't do the above exactly, this does remind me of a nurse at my previous job...
  10. by   Hoosier_RN
    Quote from djh123
    I only skimmed your post, but this really jumped out at me: "On day two of my orientation, the nurse left work and went home early, because she was tired and didn't feel like staying for her full shift. "

    Really? Seems like they could be charged with abandonment. And apparently they didn't even get in trouble with the DON or anyone else? I have to admit that while she didn't do the above exactly, this does remind me of a nurse at my previous job...
    She did it with permission, which to me raises red flags. Leaving an orientee alone? Recipe for disaster!
  11. by   Jedrnurse
    I'd keep it off of your resume and not bring it up. If you picked up any new work skills during your time there, it will show when you start your next job...
  12. by   Neats
    Honesty is the best policy and with all the electronic information your jobs will be revealed no matter how long/short.
    What I would tell a prospective employer is this...I tried to make it work and I just did not fit in. I gave it my best and this position was me a round person in a square hole. I learned a lot form this and list out 1-2 things you learned, then move on.
  13. by   rockyroad#
    It is only two months. I wouldn't put it.

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