Reccomend a gender neutral title to replace "Nurse"! - page 3

Other professional titles such as mailman or stewardess have been replaced with gender neutral titles like postal worker and flight attendant, and as someone put it before on the forums here the term... Read More

  1. by   sonnyluv
    Quote from ana tomy
    I think you are the one having a problem with the title Nurse..I would wonder why?
    you are being patronizing and rude. This is a legitimate question that every nurse should think about. Garbage men are called sanitation engineers, the janitors at my hospital are called environmental services, etc.

    It baffles me that nursing, a field that is so full of political struggle, rampant worker abuse and patient neglect resulting from that abuse should be so flippant about the fact that the very title 'NURSE' has NEGATIVE CONNOTATIONS.
    Clearly, many of the poster on allnurses.com are positive about the feminine side of nursing but frankly, I find this website to often be sexist towards men and encouraging an unprofessional attitude towards nursing itself.

    I believe the original poster has asked a legitimate question, if you do not care to answer, fine. Stop trying to turn this on him and why not, for the first itme in a while-take a look around. (The truth is you have nothing to compare it to because most nurses have not worked in a professional environment. You just don't know how bad you have it...)

    I was thinking something like Physical Clinician. Sounds good, eh? 15 bucks more an hour and more autonomy to better treat my patients with that title, no doubt.
  2. by   SteffersRN87
    my boyfriend titles himself MURSE...
  3. by   azhiker96
    Quote from swirlything
    You may have started the thread lightheartedly, but I completely agree that we should change the title, and I've been saying it for a long time. Nurse IS gender specific. The word means to suckle an infant at the breast, which only females can do.
    Surely you realize that "nurse" as a word has more than one definition. When I nurse my patients towards health there is no suckling involved. We have many words that have multiple definitions. Consider "lead". It could be a heavy gray metal, a short leash for a horse, current or past tense of guiding the horse. Such words have been fodder for comedians and comediennes for years.

    I think we'd cause more confusion if we changed the title but I am open to suggestions. Here's a wordy suggestion, "Designated Implementer of Doctor's evil Orders", DIDO.
  4. by   caliotter3
    Quote from Texas Tornado
    How about "Butt-wiper"? Very gender neutral

    Ok... just kidding... and thinking about my last two days at work!!!!
    This title takes care of two purposes: describes the job duties and is gender neutral. Also signifies the respect we get.
  5. by   Moogie
    Quote from P_RN
    hooteress and hooterless? j/k seriously
    Hey, where does that leave some of us women who are, ahem, not exactly well-endowed?

    "Murse"??? Your BF has a wicked sense of humor! Hang onto him---he's a keeper!

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~

    Although I know this thread is meant to be light-hearted, on a serious note, I prefer RN or LPN.
    Last edit by Moogie on Jun 15, '09
  6. by   caliotter3
    Quote from Moogie
    Hey, where does that leave some of us women who are, ahem, not exactly well-endowed?

    Although I know this thread is meant to be light-hearted, on a serious note, I prefer RN or LPN.
    Probably, minihooteress, and for the CNA: hooterling and minushooterling.
  7. by   Moogie
    Minihooteress! I like that!
    Last edit by Moogie on Jun 15, '09
  8. by   MurseMikeD
    Quote from SteffersRN87
    my boyfriend titles himself MURSE...
    I'm a fan of that idea... obviously.
  9. by   NickiLaughs
    "Registered Medical Management Facilitator" I'm in favor of another title. While nurses are often held as people to be trusted, the name is somewhat archaic. I'm not saying we shouldn't be proud of WHAT we do, but perhaps a new name would help others see how important our role in the care of patients.
  10. by   2BSure
    Quote from azhiker96
    Surely you realize that "nurse" as a word has more than one definition. When I nurse my patients towards health there is no suckling involved. We have many words that have multiple definitions. Consider "lead". It could be a heavy gray metal, a short leash for a horse, current or past tense of guiding the horse. Such words have been fodder for comedians and comediennes for years.

    I think we'd cause more confusion if we changed the title but I am open to suggestions. Here's a wordy suggestion, "Designated Implementer of Doctor's evil Orders", DIDO.
    DIDO is a little too close to another term....
  11. by   Multicollinearity
    I think as our culture moves away from strict traditional gender schemas, very few will be bothered by the label of "nurse."
  12. by   fins
    It's a pointless thing to try to attempt. The term nurse has female connotations because well over 90% of nurses ARE women. ANY term you use for a job that is 90% female is going to end up with those connotations. I don't care if you change the name from nurse to "hemi-powered, semi-automatic, laser-guided health missile," if you then attach it to a profession that is overwhelmingly women, then when someone sees you walk into their hospital room, you're going to hear "oh, so you're a MALE hemi-powered, semi-automatic, laser-guided health missile."

    Language can have SOME impact on perception, but it can't obliterate it. Calling me gravitationally challenged instead of fat doesn't make me look any better in a Speedo. If you got everyone in the country to agree to start calling heavily armed psychopaths "fluffy love bunnies," then people are going to start being afraid of fluffy love bunnies.

    Nurse is only going to stop being considered primarily a female term when it stops being overwhelmingly a female profession.
  13. by   cherrybreeze
    I don't think the term "nurse" is gender-specific........the IDEA of it invokes a female image, as a female-dominated profession, but the word itself is gender-neutral. NOT the same thing as, mailman, paperboy, etc. (I WAS a "paperboy" for a good few years, that one always felt uncomfortable to explain ).

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