really disappointed after my trip to the BON - page 3

We had our nursing school's "field trip" to the BON this week. I have to say it was so disappointing. I went in with the idea in my head that it would be fair and professional, but in fact it just... Read More

  1. by   Magsulfate
    Quote from Valerie Salva
    I think the RN with the DUI was treated fairly. I think that the LPN who lied to get Demerol then used on the job was let off with a slap on the wrist.
    From the cases I am aware of, I do think BONs deal with RNs more harshly.
    I think you all don't realize what the "peer assistance" entails. The program in itself is very harsh. However, it is so strict that if you want to continue to be a nurse, you MUST recover. SO, in a sense, it is punishment AND recovery at the same time. It is not just a slap on the wrist.

    I will repeat,, it is NOT just a slap on the wrist. By far, it is not.
  2. by   saillady
    I'm very curious. The BON you describe sounds remarkably like the Colorado BON. Despite your age, your observations were very astute. My sister has an issue that has spanned the last 4, soon to be 5 years. Her nurse attorney told her that the Board does not like it when an attorney is involved and they tend to "come down harder." The attorney also described the Board as "arbitrary and capricious." A question is this, "Is it possible for unjust charges to be brought against a nurse?" If yes, then does the nurse not have a right to defend her/himself? Does s/he not have a right to expect the Board to act with integrity and rational consideration?

    I have watched my sister's process unfold from a distance and, for her, it has been life-altering. BONs are comprised of humans who are theoretically guided by the Nurse Practice Act. The substance of the Nurse Practice Act varies from state to state. Some Nurse Practice Acts are 10s of pages long, while others are greater than 100 pages. You can imagine that a less specific Nurse Practice Act would leave more for subjective interpretation - hence, possibly the root of what you observed. I am a RN who is untrained in law and can only speculate.

    One nurse put it aptly in an earlier post... you had a great experience before you even started your career. Thankfully, most of us will never have to experience what you saw. It does, however, behoove us to support our state nurses associations and familiarize ourselves with this aspect of our chosen profession. You never know when your number may be the next called!
  3. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from morte
    my first impulse was to agree with you....but on rereading it the first nurse, basically it sounds like she tried to lie her way out of it....i think this is what got her in the most trouble......but if she made the call before the day was over, i would have to say...she did her responsiblity...so things are a little strange here
    That was how I felt...if she made the call, even if it was a bit late, I can't really see the difference. I am understanding the rationale since I am reading other opinions, but, hey... I would never say that I have trust in the BON, anyhow.
  4. by   *ac*
    I know two people whose licenses were restricted, one d/t an unproven allegation of being impaired at work, one d/t self-report of drug diversion. Both got the same "sentence" of random drug-testing, monthly reporting, and a narcotic key restriction - both for five years. Both of them were almost unemployable for five years. And the catch is that the five years doesn't accumulate unless employed.

    I've never understood how the first person got that treatment when she was never tested. Nothing was ever proven. The consequences almost ruined her. It's made me very afraid of the BON.
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    What I find interesting is that persons can actually sit for these proceedings going by the initial thread. I'd be interested in attending myself, as long as I am not on the receiving end...but, Albany is too far for me to just drop on by. Judging by what this sounds like, I would probably run for the hills and surrender my license out of sheer fear. I really don't trust them, either, to be honest.
  6. by   DolceVita
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    What I find interesting is that persons can actually sit for these proceedings going by the initial thread. I'd be interested in attending myself, as long as I am not on the receiving end...but, Albany is too far for me to just drop on by. Judging by what this sounds like, I would probably run for the hills and surrender my license out of sheer fear. I really don't trust them, either, to be honest.
    My BON just had a session outside of their normal location and invited licensees AND the public to attend. They normally meet in my city. I think it was very cool of them to do this.

    I am going to make a point of going to the next open session -- maybe all nursing students should go once?
  7. by   Cherybaby
    I would read the Nurses & Recovery forum to get a better feel of what peer review, drug testing, BON mandates, probation, punitive damages, fines, IPN evaluations, etc. are all about. There are no slaps on the wrist, RN or LPN.

    Sadly, in nursing, there is no forgiving your past. Sometimes the demons come out of the closet to haunt you in your future. It's unfortunate and unfair...but that's the way it is.

    That is what I would tell the 19 year old nurse who was in this discussion. Be careful what you do now...as it can gravely effect your future.
    Last edit by Cherybaby on Jun 23, '09 : Reason: brain freeze.
  8. by   Junebugfairy
    i do not drink and drive, period.

    if i am going out to the 21 and up bowling alley and i plan on drinking even just one cocktail, i take a darn taxi cab.

    if i am driving i will not drink, point blank, end of story, the end.

    i believe that drinking and driving shows a complete disregard for not only your own personal safety, but the safety of others.

    i believe she was fairly treated. you do the crime and you do the time, complete with the consequences that may come later.
  9. by   pagandeva2000
    How was this event arranged? I would like to sit for this myself because it would give me a perspective and probably keep me on my toes. Did the professor arrange this? What state is this (if you are allowed to say)?

    I definitely believe that this should be included in all cirriculums to prepare students for the risk. Thanks for starting this thread, it was enlightening.
  10. by   JDCitizen
    I don't know how the BON is in other states but here in Georgia the BON duty is to protect the public not help the nurse. Nurses in Georgia pays fees every other year to an agency that has almost god like authority over them.
  11. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from JDCitizen
    I don't know how the BON is in other states but here in Georgia the BON duty is to protect the public not help the nurse. Nurses in Georgia pays fees every other year to an agency that has almost god like authority over them.
    NY BON is supposed to be for the same purpose, but to tell you the truth, these are ALL people who have not been working the bedside for many years, therefore have no real idea about what we trench nurses put up with. Can't trust them.
  12. by   caliotter3
    I've seen that the Board is hard put to handle an application for licensure correctly so I know I'm toast if my license ever ends up getting questioned. But of course, one has to first get a chance to get the license from the Board, before worrying about what the Board is going to do to the license if they ever issue it.
    Last edit by caliotter3 on Jun 23, '09
  13. by   cursedandblessed
    i think that explains a lot about the rule that they've had at several of my rotation sites: the nurse who pulls the narcotic, gives the narcotic. i just thought it was that way everywhere. i wish we could go on a field trip like that.

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