Question about applying for hospital job

  1. So I have a question about applying for a hospital job. I graduated in May and got my RN license in July. I have stayed with the same company I have been with for the past 8 years, a group home that is not very medically needy. I transitioned from Med Aide to LPN around 10 months ago, and then to RN in July after passing NCLEX.

    I know I need to get into a hospital to learn skills (we don't do really any skills at my facility at all). We do work with G-tubes and every now and then I float to a house with a trach. Will I be in danger of getting overlooked by hospitals since I have had my license for a few months now and not been using my skills? What would be the best way to go about trying to land a hospital job in terms of selling myself on my application or resume? I have had my RN license for about a full 3 months to this day. Any help or suggestions are welcomed, thank you.
  2. Visit Aliens05 profile page

    About Aliens05, ASN, RN

    Joined: Sep '16; Posts: 61; Likes: 73

    13 Comments

  3. by   cyc0sys
    Sounds like you really don't have any acute or sub-acute care experience even as an LPN. You're basically starting out as a 'new nurse'. Depending on the area, many hospitals such as HCA offer new RN graduate program training for a 2 year contractual commitment. That might be something to consider. Otherwise, there are plenty of employment opportunities outside the hospital arena for new RN. Corrections, school nurse, and home health would jump right on you for work.
  4. by   SqrB3ar
    You're still pretty fresh, the good thing about you working as an RN at your current facility is that you're being paid (hopefully there was an increase). I'd broaden your search to hospitals away from the big cities if you've had no luck.
  5. by   Aliens05
    Yes, considerable increase, I make pretty decent money, probably just as much as I would make anywhere else. The problem with my current job is no use of skills whatsoever other than really just assessing people and charting it and supervising the med aides. My job has a ton of down time, is super simple and easy, but I am very worried if I don't get into a hospital soon to learn my skills that I won't be able to ever get hired into a hospital if I wait too long, in effect never learning skills. I haven't applied at any yet, I plan to within a couple weeks, but the main thing I wasn't sure of is when I do apply, how do I address why I have been at a job for 3 months as an RN and have zero skills. I am unsure of how big of a concern this will be to potential employers.
  6. by   RNNPICU
    So you job involves assessing patients and charting your observations plus supervision? Sounds like a nursing job. Just because your job may not involve ther TASKS, doesn't mean you aren't gaining experience. When you decide on a new job, you will need to explain your assessment skills. TASKS such as changing a trach, suctioning, G-tube care, drawing blood are all TASKS that can be learned by anyone and are not unique to a nursing scope of practice. If you know how to listen to breath sounds, prioritze care, recognize that there is a change in your patient status that needs more attention, can complete you assessment and charting in timley fasion (time management), and anticpate needs..... those are nursing skills. Tasks can be taught to anyone such as parents, PCT/CNAs, other staff.

    It sounds like this may give you a good base of skill. What are thing that you like to do, not everyone needs to work in a hospital. I know of someone whose only clinical time in a hospital was during nursing school clinicals, this RN now works in community clinics and has their entire clinical career. Could they start an IV? Maybe, but can they assess needs and access to care and barriers unique to the community? Absolutely. Nursing Skills are unique to the position and place of employment. There is no such thing as losing skills, skills are utilized in a variety of settings, the most important skill you have is assessment.
  7. by   SqrB3ar
    Quote from SqrB3ar
    You're still pretty fresh, the good thing about you working as an RN at your current facility is that you're being paid (hopefully there was an increase). I'd broaden your search to hospitals away from the big cities if you've had no luck.
    Just say you've been working with them for 8 years. If you think it's dishonest to say you've been employed with this very company for 3 months as an RN, say so. I don't think it'll look bad if you've stuck around with them for eight years.
  8. by   Been there,done that
    You have plenty of skills. What other skills do you thing you would learn in a hospital, and why do you want to work in a hospital?
  9. by   Aliens05
    I was primarily basing this off my belief that I needed to get hospital experience if I ever wanted to broaden my job opportunities, travel, etc. The facility I am at now basically is just a house, you assess them, chart, hang out with the few clients, take them on outings, and then go home. From talking to other nurses they had always made it sound to me like hospital experience is necessary due to the fact that at my current facility we do not ever do IVs, catheters, nothing. Basically if they need anything we send them out to the nearest hospital, so my main job as a new nurse is just to see if any changes happen that they would need to be sent out for. The residents are very stable and really are not that medical at all.

    I am not sure what I would like to do in the future, I have thought about travel nursing, but I am unsure what specialty I would enjoy/not enjoy. Another reason I am considering a hospital job is to further my education to BSN, and potentially later on MSN. Working at some of my local hospitals they offer basically free tuition if you sign on with them after you graduate, which is somewhat tempting, yet scary.
  10. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from Aliens05
    Yes, considerable increase, I make pretty decent money, probably just as much as I would make anywhere else. The problem with my current job is no use of skills whatsoever other than really just assessing people and charting it and supervising the med aides. My job has a ton of down time, is super simple and easy, but I am very worried if I don't get into a hospital soon to learn my skills that I won't be able to ever get hired into a hospital if I wait too long, in effect never learning skills. I haven't applied at any yet, I plan to within a couple weeks, but the main thing I wasn't sure of is when I do apply, how do I address why I have been at a job for 3 months as an RN and have zero skills. I am unsure of how big of a concern this will be to potential employers.
    Be careful what you wish for
    A three month gap after achieving your licensure is acceptable. You have been in the same facility for years, it's okay to decide to transition from group home to hospital at your pace.

    Just don't sell yourself short in the interview... you bring a lot to the table.

    Good luck.
  11. by   Have Nurse
    In addition to what our colleagues state, I might say that most hospitals have you assigned to a Preceptor and use a "Skills" checklist for you to get some experience doing some of the things that you may need to know.

    If you can somehow present yourself during the interview process as having the advantage of being new enough that you don't suffer from burn-out, are excited about expanding your skills and knowledge, who knows?

    You might land that job. Go for it!!

    But do some personal study too to stay abreast of things along the way.
  12. by   Have Nurse
    Quote from Aliens05
    I was primarily basing this off my belief that I needed to get hospital experience if I ever wanted to broaden my job opportunities, travel, etc. The facility I am at now basically is just a house, you assess them, chart, hang out with the few clients, take them on outings, and then go home. From talking to other nurses they had always made it sound to me like hospital experience is necessary due to the fact that at my current facility we do not ever do IVs, catheters, nothing. Basically if they need anything we send them out to the nearest hospital, so my main job as a new nurse is just to see if any changes happen that they would need to be sent out for. The residents are very stable and really are not that medical at all.

    I am not sure what I would like to do in the future, I have thought about travel nursing, but I am unsure what specialty I would enjoy/not enjoy. Another reason I am considering a hospital job is to further my education to BSN, and potentially later on MSN. Working at some of my local hospitals they offer basically free tuition if you sign on with them after you graduate, which is somewhat tempting, yet scary.

    I wouldn't try Travel Nursing just yet. In the field, often you are alone and really need to be on top of your game. You won't have machines and others to bale you out. Until you are back in the office, you are it. You will have lots of overtime and the places you go into can be dicey and unsafe at times. Also, you will face challenges you may not expect.

    Wait a few years before you do that. I am speaking from years of experience. Read my blog and you will understand.
  13. by   Aliens05
    thanks for the feedback, where can I find your blog? I didnt see it by clicking on your user name unless i missed it.
  14. by   dianearc
    It depends on what state you are in. But hospital experience is really valuable. The kind that a group home will never afford you. & if you are interested in travel nursing, definately look into hospitals. Like someone mentioned, you may have to move away from the bigger cities (like NYC, San Francisco etc) Those cities that don't hire New grads. So broaden your search area. Even with the 8yrs of experience in a group home, you'll be considered a "new grad" at a hospital & you'll understand why once you actually start working on a hospital unit. Your pay may drop, at least in that first year at the hospital, but the experience you'll get will be invaluable. All the best!!

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