PRN Question

  1. I work PRN. We are required to submit our availability for each month at the beginning of the month. We may or may not get shifts for the days we indicate we are available. We check each week to see if we are on the schedule. Today, I was told the new policy is that I am required to be available for every shift I indicate I'm available whether or not I'm on the schedule. So, if indicate I am available for a shift on a certain day, I am required to be available that entire shift even if I am not on the schedule "just in case they need me" at some point during that shift. If they call at anytime during the shift, I am considered a "call in" if I don't go in. I am not paid unless they call me and I go in but I cannot do anything because they might call. Is this how PRN works?
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    About Okieatheart

    Joined: Apr '18; Posts: 4; Likes: 3

    17 Comments

  3. by   Meriwhen
    Quote from Okieatheart
    I work PRN. We are required to submit our availability for each month at the beginning of the month. We may or may not get shifts for the days we indicate we are available. We check each week to see if we are on the schedule. Today, I was told the new policy is that I am required to be available for every shift I indicate I'm available whether or not I'm on the schedule. So, if indicate I am available for a shift on a certain day, I am required to be available that entire shift even if I am not on the schedule "just in case they need me" at some point during that shift. If they call at anytime during the shift, I am considered a "call in" if I don't go in. I am not paid unless they call me and I go in but I cannot do anything because they might call. Is this how PRN works?
    That's not been my experience with PRN. I would put in my availability and I presumed I was scheduled unless told otherwise. Sometimes, "otherwise" occurred 2 hours before the shift was supposed to begin. But once I was cancelled, I was not expected to be on-call just in case I was needed. A couple of times, I was called after I was cancelled to see if I was still available, but I was not under any obligation.

    However, that's not to say that your facility's policy is incorrect. It's strange and inconvenient, but it may not necessarily be incorrect.

    The question is whether you agree to work under this new policy...and if you're not willing or able to, then you need to reconsider your schedule and whether you even want to work there anymore.
  4. by   JKL33
    Submit availability in accordance with the number of hours you are required to work per pay period. So if you are required to work, say, 8 hours/PP, then submit 8 hours worth of availability for each PP. Trust me, when they need help they will call you whether you are on-call or have indicated availability or not. By the way, I don't suggest being on-call for pennies on the dollar, either. Say no to that.

    By the way, don't make a ruckus about this. Just keep mum and do as above.

    Time to find a new gig.
  5. by   Okieatheart
    Thank you for replying. This is a new policy is what I was told. Historically, I would submit what I could work and work the shifts they put me on. Being required to be available even if I'm not on the schedule and not being paid seems wrong.
  6. by   NurseCard
    In my experience, Home Health works that way, but I've never worked in a
    facility like that. You work when you're on the schedule. That's how it
    usually is.

    Either plan to work/be on call on the days you say you are available, or
    find a new gig, like JKL33 says. On the days you are just "on call", they
    had better be paying you SOMETHING for that!
  7. by   JKL33
    Quote from Okieatheart
    Thank you for replying. This is a new policy is what I was told. Historically, I would submit what I could work and work the shifts they put me on. Being required to be available even if I'm not on the schedule and not being paid seems wrong.
    You are correct, it is a ridiculous expectation. It means they think you all are stupid people of very little value.
  8. by   Okieatheart
    They pay me nothing if I'm just "on call". If I sit and wait to go in if the call, I'm not being paid for that time.
    Last edit by Okieatheart on Apr 21 : Reason: Added additional comments
  9. by   Double-Helix
    My first nursing job was similar. It was a new "full-time flex" role where I essentially gave them 5 days of availability per week and they could call me in 2 hours before my shift any of those days until I had met my hours (3 shifts) for the week. I was only guaranteed 3 shifts every 2 weeks.

    So if I was "available" M-F, they could call me in on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and I would know I was off the hook for the rest of the week. It also meant that the following week I may not get any hours at all, but I still had to be available M-F just in case.

    As you can imagine, it was nearly impossible to make any plans during those days, or plan child care, or have a predictable income. But I was a new grad and willing to do what I had to do to get experience. Now, I believe almost all new hires to this facility are on some "flex" type of arrangement.
  10. by   AJJKRN
    I would check your states labor laws. My work tried to stop paying us for the last four hours of shifts that we were put on standby for a few years ago. It only lasted maybe three months and I still believe they found out they were breaking some kind of labor law and decided not to risk getting caught and having to pay fines. We get paid a few dollars an hour when on standby...I can't imagine it being legal for your company to place you on call without compensation unless you signed an agreement. Hmm...
  11. by   TruvyNurse
    This has not been my PRN experience. They let me know their open shifts and I pick up what I choose. They also call me when there are call ins to see if I'll cover. I work PRN at 2 places and it's a good gig.
  12. by   RNperdiem
    I guess every place has a different policy. Mine is pretty simple. I sign up on the same sign-up program as the rest of the staff. That is my work schedule with a minimum requirement of one shift every 2 weeks.
    If the census is low, overtime staff gets called off first, followed by per diem staff. Sometimes if census is low, we might get a delayed start time which is like being on call. But this is only for the shifts signed up for.
    I don't think I would tolerate too much unpaid on call time.
  13. by   xoemmylouox
    I'd be looking for a new job ASAP. This is a BS policy that I wouldn't tolerate.
  14. by   not.done.yet
    Don't quote me on it, but I suspect it is illegal to expect you to be "on call" without "on call" pay.

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