Prayer @ staff meeting - page 4

At a recent "mandatory" staff meeting the ADON requested one of the nurses to open our meeting with a prayer. We work in a state correctional facility. No one seemed offended, I just thought it was... Read More

  1. by   Bettie P
    Quote from HappyBunnyNurse
    Whether you choose to go directly to the person or report her I think you should suggest the prayer be replaced by a silent reflection. That way those who want to can pray those that don't can just reflect. All nurses need a quiet moment during the day! I feel it is more professional instead of just complaining about a problem to also propose a solution.
    Staff meetings aren't for reflection or prayer. They are for conveying job relevant information. Please...they waste enough time as it is...don't add another minute and expect me to sit quietly through it. I've got stuff to do!
  2. by   gerry79
    Religion and politics should be kept out of the work place. Highly inappropriate if you ask me. The boss is mandating prayer, since the meeting was mandatory, and in this economic climate who will openly oppose? What if a junior staff member were atheist, would that person have been granted permission to skip the prayer? OK, I am merely speculating on what actually happened in the meeting, but prayer has no business in the work place in my opinion.
  3. by   AlabamaBelle
    I am a conservative Christian and I do believe in the power of prayer. That being said - however, it is highly unprofessional and downright inappropriate to open a MANDATORY meeting with a prayer.

    I'd go for going up the food chain since it was your boss.
  4. by   pagandeva2000
    People are individuals, faiths are not always similar, so, I would believe that the people that wish to enforce this consider how it may feel to encounter some of the other faith based practices...would they feel comfortable the Wiccan pulled out a tarot card for the day and asked for the crowd to meditate on it's spiritual message? What about if the Gnostic Christian started quoting scripture from the Urantia, Apocryphia or Lost Books of the Bible? Would that still be okay? A vow of silence for the day? Or, maybe someone can approach you and say that your child needs to have an arranged marriage with someone in order for you to remain accepted in that environment? Do you see how intrusive this can become?

    The point I am trying to make is that what is fine for one is intrusive for the other. If one does not think they want to be exposed or forced to listen to my ramblings of faith, keep in mind that I am probably not that interested in yours, either.

    There are similarities in most humans as well...those that want to pay their bills, care for their familes and have a purpose in life. Most people gain this from working. We should not be naive enough to believe that we each think/act identically, we are grown individuals, so, there are certain places where private beliefs such as in religion, spirituality and sexual orientation should be left behind.
  5. by   Jolie
    pagan,

    I agree wholeheartedly. Opening a staff meeting at a non-religious facility with a prayer was a bone-headed thing to do. But we all do bone-headed things at times.

    I am just saddened by the prevailing sentiment that this somehow constitutes a major infraction that warrants anonymous reports HR, a report to the BON or a psych evaluation, among other suggested disciplinary measures. Unless this manager has a history of flying off the handle, mental instability, creating a hostile work environment or ridiculing employees for their religious beliefs (or lack thereof), I think it is professional and appropriate for the staff to approach her first. She may well come to realize her error and apologize without ever having to involve HR the BON or a psychiatrist.

    The OP did not indicate that this manager has a history of mis-treating employees or exposing them to religious content. It sounds like this was a "first offense," which leads me to believe that she ought to get the benefit of a friendly conversation before her staff runs off to higher authorities (no pun intended.) It makes me wonder if these same staff members run to HR every time there is a question over scheduling, patient satisfaction, mandatory education or a minor disagreement between co-workers. If so, I can understand the manager's need for prayer.

    I'll close with my opinion that most nurses are sadly lacking in knowledge of, and experience in, conflict resolution. Basic nursing programs would do well to teach this valuable skill. It would make our profession much more professional.
  6. by   LaneyB
    Again, when you are not a member of a religious minority you view things differently. Many of the posters on here have learned the hard way not to directly confront religious bosses.
  7. by   sharpeimom
    i have been prayed over and for by very religious coworkers and an employer because "i'm not a real christian" and unless i repent and convert to their specific faith, i will "burn in the jaws of h***fire!"
    huh? i must have missed the announcement that we episcopalians were drummed out of the christian family.

    sharpeimom
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Jolie
    pagan,

    I agree wholeheartedly. Opening a staff meeting at a non-religious facility with a prayer was a bone-headed thing to do. But we all do bone-headed things at times.

    I am just saddened by the prevailing sentiment that this somehow constitutes a major infraction that warrants anonymous reports HR, a report to the BON or a psych evaluation, among other suggested disciplinary measures. Unless this manager has a history of flying off the handle, mental instability, creating a hostile work environment or ridiculing employees for their religious beliefs (or lack thereof), I think it is professional and appropriate for the staff to approach her first. She may well come to realize her error and apologize without ever having to involve HR the BON or a psychiatrist.

    The OP did not indicate that this manager has a history of mis-treating employees or exposing them to religious content. It sounds like this was a "first offense," which leads me to believe that she ought to get the benefit of a friendly conversation before her staff runs off to higher authorities (no pun intended.) It makes me wonder if these same staff members run to HR every time there is a question over scheduling, patient satisfaction, mandatory education or a minor disagreement between co-workers. If so, I can understand the manager's need for prayer.

    I'll close with my opinion that most nurses are sadly lacking in knowledge of, and experience in, conflict resolution. Basic nursing programs would do well to teach this valuable skill. It would make our profession much more professional.
    I appreciate your thoughts and I so respect your commentary...you have no idea. I believe that what has happened here is evidence of lateral violence in the workplace that has made most of the posters on this thread (including myself) suspicious. Many times, it is so subtle, hard to prove. And, it starts many times over differences that either have no business being in the workplace to begin with, people that are different or jealousy.

    How many times have we witnessed the an attractive, poised, knowledgable and organized nurse become belittled because she shows initiative? Or, how many people have been subtly harassed because of the color of their skin, sexual preferences or other issues I can't think to mention at this time? And, sure, rules are made, policies were written, even Joint Commission set ground rules for lateral violence. But, most of us have experienced that many times, these rules are not followed. And, it starts with someone harassing someone and the others don't speak out because they are afraid for themselves. Shifts have changed, people transferred to horrendous departments, staff become harassed for taking time off to deal with emergencies, legitimately processed time off is disapproved...I can go on and on. It may be true that this particular person meant no harm. What has happened here is that most of our attenaes have rised because we have either been burned or have witnessed the actions of someone else being burned and being too helpless to say what is happening is wrong.

close