Please share something GOOD that happened at work! - page 3

Maybe as a tag-along to the thread that has people in a twist over whether or not nurses are being positive enough, or too negative, or whatever, we could try for something a little upbeat. What... Read More

  1. by   Ruby Vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]well, i'm certainly guilty of perpetuating the negative threads! so here goes:

    i learned something new and totally useful from a student nurse today, and when i told him that, it made his day! and later, his instructor sought me out and thanked me for 1) making his day and 2) the positive feedback.

    i got a fabulous compliment from my patient -- totally unrelated to my nursing care, but appreciated all the same. i work in an adult unit, and had an 18 year old patient. i was dreading it like crazy because i work in an adult unit and 18 year olds are still adolescents. this kid was the nicest kid! pleasant, cooperative, grateful! his mother was wonderful, too. he told me something about "when you're as old as my mother". (i'm at least 10 years older than her!)

    i was able to teach something to a co-worker. something that provided an "aha!" moment, and made other bits and pieces slide into place.

  2. by   BJLynn
    I went into give a resident a depo shot in her room. She was in bed. This particular resident can not move herself in bed due to neuro/muscular condition. I proceed to give her her shot, and I ask her if she needs anything. She needed moved around. So I proceed to move her and arrange all of her pillows for her. Then I tucked her in and said goodnight. The next day, the social services director handed me a card that this resident had painstakenly written out for me (part was written for her) thanking me for my kindness the night before.

    Made me feel all warm and tingly inside.
  3. by   Jokerhill
    Well I just have to add mine here. I was on my way into work from the parking lot and see a car parked in the pick up zone. I the see one of our nurses look into the back of the car and run back into the hospital. Well being me I had to check it out, and there he was a baby coming out to play. The father was leaning into the back seat but made room for me. Well I could not stop there so another contraction and all that was left in were the feet. No one was there but us yet and I hoped the other nurse went for help and supplies. I then had dad pinch the cord, and I stimulated the baby getting a cry. After that a delivery team arrived but I was already so involved and stimulated myself, I just barked out instructions for the DR. to give me some clamps and sizers, clamped and cut the cord, and wrapped him in blankets. When I handed the baby out about 40-50 people and workers had gathered around and clapped. I forgot about the mom at that point and saw the Dr. getting her up out of the car, so I went back in and helped her out. I go on high risk deliveries as part of my job in the NICU so I knew what to do, just never delivered one on my own before. The baby was great went home the next day. I am glad help came out though as I was about to dry the baby with my scrub top. I don't know how or who did it but there were people holding up blankets for privacy and we got the supplies we needed out there and it all worked like as if we had practiced it, but I know I never practiced that before.
    Last edit by Jokerhill on Mar 15, '07
  4. by   muffie
    nobody died on my watch !
  5. by   muffie
    Quote from Jokerhill
    Well I just have to add mine here. I was on my way into work from the parking lot and see a car parked in the pick up zone. I the see one of our nurses look into the back of the car and run back into the hospital. Well being me I had to check it out, and there he was a baby coming out to play. The father was leaning into the back seat but made room for me. Well I could not stop there so another contraction and all that was left in were the feet. No one was there but us yet and I hoped the other nurse went for help and supplies. I then had dad pinch the cord, and I stimulated the baby getting a cry. After that a delivery team arrived but I was already so involved and stimulated myself, I just barked out instructions for the DR. to give me some clamps and sizers, clamped and cut the cord, and wrapped him in blankets. When I handed the baby out about 40-50 people and workers had gathered around and clapped. I forgot about the mom at that point and saw the Dr. getting her up out of the car, so I went back in and helped her out. I go on high risk deliveries as part of my job in the NICU so I knew what to do, just never delivered one on my own before. The baby was great went home the next day. I am glad help came out though as I was about to dry the baby with my scrub top. I don't know how or who did it but there were people holding up blankets for privacy and we got the supplies we needed out there and it all worked like as if we had practiced it, but I know I never practiced that before.

    very cool story
  6. by   muffie
    poopoocaca

    double post
  7. by   twinmommy+2
    Not long ago we had a pt on the floor who was just there for end of life care. The daughter was there every moment that she could and turned out to be a great lady (thought she was going to be a very intrusive family member at first). I had her as a patient for a full weekend and on the days I didn't have her I would ask the daughter how she was doing and give the occasional hug if I saw tears in her eyes.

    She wrote a letter (a pretty lengthy one at that) to the hospital which my manager read out loud at a staff meeting. She praised us up one way and down another. I had never gotten so much of a thank you even though it didn't name me in person or anything. There weere too many of us to name from her veiw point. I was very proud!
  8. by   emmycRN
    I had a family member tell me the other day that when she found out I was working the night shift she said a quick prayer that I would be taking care of her son that night. This was at the beginning of my shift and it absolutely made my night. She also told me that after the last night I had taken care of her son, her husband had commented on how "unflappable" and competent I was. This was when the pt was having serious problems and had to be rushed to CT. Her comments amazed me because that night I was so anxious that I was literally shaking. I guess it pays off to act like you know everything will be OK even when you are freaking out yourself.
  9. by   emmycRN
    Quote from mugg54
    I got report on an 87 year old man admitted with CHF. I was told in report "He is difficult and very grumpy". I walked in his room and introduced myself and proceeded to do his assessment. At first he was rather abrupt with me. He just seemed very sad to me when I was talking with him. I continued to do his assessment and started talking with him. Then I kind of made a little joke about the hospital food and he joked right back! We kept joking back and forth for a few minutes and he started laughing and telling me stories.

    I checked back on him several times throughout my shift. I never did anything extra special, just did the things that us nurses do to try and keep our patients as comfortable as possible.

    When I got ready to leave my shift, I went in for my last minute checks and told him I was leaving. He told me "I just want to thank you for being so kind to me. You took time to talk to me and you made me laugh, that is something I haven't done in 2 years now, every since my wife passed away I haven't smiled let alone laugh." Then he said "You know you just kind of restored my faith in you kids. Usually you kids don't have time to fool with old geezers like me." Now when he said that, I got my biggest laugh, cause this kid is 47 years old!:spin: I smiled all day thinking that he had called me a kid!
    cute cute cute!!! :heartbeat :spin:
  10. by   Gromit
    Quote from Jokerhill
    Well I just have to add mine here. I was on my way into work from the parking lot and see a car parked in the pick up zone. I the see one of our nurses look into the back of the car and run back into the hospital. Well being me I had to check it out, and there he was a baby coming out to play. The father was leaning into the back seat but made room for me. Well I could not stop there so another contraction and all that was left in were the feet. No one was there but us yet and I hoped the other nurse went for help and supplies. I then had dad pinch the cord, and I stimulated the baby getting a cry. After that a delivery team arrived but I was already so involved and stimulated myself, I just barked out instructions for the DR. to give me some clamps and sizers, clamped and cut the cord, and wrapped him in blankets. When I handed the baby out about 40-50 people and workers had gathered around and clapped. I forgot about the mom at that point and saw the Dr. getting her up out of the car, so I went back in and helped her out. I go on high risk deliveries as part of my job in the NICU so I knew what to do, just never delivered one on my own before. The baby was great went home the next day. I am glad help came out though as I was about to dry the baby with my scrub top. I don't know how or who did it but there were people holding up blankets for privacy and we got the supplies we needed out there and it all worked like as if we had practiced it, but I know I never practiced that before.

    THAT IS SO COOL!
    Last edit by Gromit on Mar 15, '07
  11. by   RNsRWe
    I am SO glad to see these amazing stories!! They are the best; I've been smiling and "aw"ing for twenty minutes now

    I'm going to start printing these to save in my work notebook....sometimes you just need a little reminder of why you do what you do, when there's a bad shift.

    That story about the baby in the parking lot is incredible.....how fortunate for them that a nurse with the know-how happened by! I would have been semi-useless, I'm sure....kudos to you
  12. by   princess_picklejuice
    This didn't happen to me personally, but some of my co-workers were...

    A patient, "Peter" was dying on our Cancer Care unit. All through his illness, "Rose" stayed by his side doing all that she could to make him comfortable. The staff found out that "Rose" was not his wife but that they had been together for over 10 years. When it was obvious that our patient was going to die soon, Rose called in their families to say their good-byes.

    One nurse who had gotten close to Rose discovered that the reason they never got married is that they didn't have any money for a wedding and Peter did not want to burden Rose with his illness.

    After a quick staff conference, the staff asked Rose and Peter if they wanted a marriage ceremony. They both started crying and said yes. In less than 3 hours, staff who were off came in with flowers, a white arch, a small wedding cake and a bouquet and veil for Rose. Dietary pulled together finger sandwiches, cookies and punch. Our hospital chaplain came up to do the ceremony.

    In front of family and the staff, Rose and Peter were married. He was unable to speak, being very short of breath, so our chaplain took his hand and said - Peter, do you take Rose to be your wife? If so, squeeze my hand. - and in front of everyone our chaplain said - Peter says I do. There wasn't a dry eye in the place.

    Peter died hours later.

    I'm proud to work with such wonderful people.
  13. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from princess_picklejuice
    This didn't happen to me personally, but some of my co-workers were...

    A patient, "Peter" was dying on our Cancer Care unit. All through his illness, "Rose" stayed by his side doing all that she could to make him comfortable. The staff found out that "Rose" was not his wife but that they had been together for over 10 years. When it was obvious that our patient was going to die soon, Rose called in their families to say their good-byes.

    One nurse who had gotten close to Rose discovered that the reason they never got married is that they didn't have any money for a wedding and Peter did not want to burden Rose with his illness.

    After a quick staff conference, the staff asked Rose and Peter if they wanted a marriage ceremony. They both started crying and said yes. In less than 3 hours, staff who were off came in with flowers, a white arch, a small wedding cake and a bouquet and veil for Rose. Dietary pulled together finger sandwiches, cookies and punch. Our hospital chaplain came up to do the ceremony.

    In front of family and the staff, Rose and Peter were married. He was unable to speak, being very short of breath, so our chaplain took his hand and said - Peter, do you take Rose to be your wife? If so, squeeze my hand. - and in front of everyone our chaplain said - Peter says I do. There wasn't a dry eye in the place.

    Peter died hours later.

    I'm proud to work with such wonderful people.
    what a really nice thing to do

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