Please help Is 40,000 Enough

  1. My Aunt told me about this hospital that offers RN's a starting salary of 40,000 a yr is that fair or is this a rip off i wanted to start off making at least 50,000 working with newborns is this possible also we are talking about a BSN here is 40,000 really ideal help me out is that right or am I being greedy LOL
    I live in GA, But this Job is in Washington.
    Last edit by pbaby1123 on May 22, '09 : Reason: added needed information
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    About pbaby1123

    Joined: Mar '09; Posts: 15
    from US

    9 Comments

  3. by   FireStarterRN
    You should ask what the hourly wage is. Staff nurses don't get a salary.
  4. by   pagandeva2000
    I think it depends on where you live and the going rate for RNs in that area. I am an LPN and make that much, now. I live in New York; RNs start here anywhere between $62-$80,000 per year. The cost of living is higher, here, however.
  5. by   sunray12
    It depends on what's usual and customary pay in your state. Whether or not 40K a decent wage depends on the cost of living in your state. There's a recent post here on this board that says starting pay for RN's someplace in OK is 18 something/hour. In my area starting salaries for RN's run in the mid 40s. Wages in parts of the NE and California are higher.
  6. by   TheCommuter
    We need to know a few things before your question can get answered.

    1. Where are you located? In general, nursing pay is lower in places such as Alabama and higher in places such as San Francisco. Cost-of-living, along with supply, determines how much nurses get paid in a certain region.

    2. What is the hourly pay rate? Hospital staff nurses tend to receive an hourly wage, not a yearly salary. There are very few exceptions to this rule.

    3. If the city or town in which you live had an oversupply of nurses, the pay will be low. If the city has a true shortage of nurses, the pay will be high.

    4. Here's another shortcut: take the hourly wage and multiply it by 2. That will be your yearly pay with no overtime, benefits, or shift differentials included. For example, $20 per hour multiplied by 2 equals $40k per year (approximately).
    Last edit by TheCommuter on May 22, '09 : Reason: added something
  7. by   OC_An Khe
    The multiplying by 2 only comes close if you work 40hr/ week. If the position is for 3 12hr shifts the shortcut will give you a figure taht is 10% less then what you will make.
    As other posters have said it is all about the area you move to and the cost of living in that area. Only you can decide if it is enough for you. But I think the thrust of your question is that amount a fair market wage. That is going to take research on your part or more specific details as to type of employer ( hospital, SNF, home care etc.) and geographic areas to get potential help from fellow posters.
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    Are you willing to travel to this Washington job? And, are you a new grad? If so, I want to say that if this is a nice place that is supportive of new nurses, consider taking it for a year, even if the salary is not much because most times, new nurses are not treated very fairly and if you can take gentle steps to gain confidence, then, it may be worth it, temporarily.
  9. by   Halinja
    I work in Oregon, not too far from Washington. The going rate for new grads here is almost $29 per hour for a 36 hour week. (3 12's) That's a little over 50,000 per year. Often in the hospitals around here you end up working an extra shift every pay period. So add a little to that. But the place matters a lot. Someone who is paying less may be a great place to work for and so doesn't have to pay a premium to get someone. Or, if it's a small rural town, that would make a difference too. I live in a city. One of the local small town hospitals pays almost $3 an hour less. grin. Not a very coherent answer...
  10. by   RNperdiem
    Beyond the money, how does the rest of the benefit package look?
    If the health coverage is affordable, the parking free, and there is generous paid time off, that would counterbalance a slightly low starting rate.
  11. by   lindarn
    Quote from pbaby1123
    My Aunt told me about this hospital that offers RN's a starting salary of 40,000 a yr is that fair or is this a rip off i wanted to start off making at least 50,000 working with newborns is this possible also we are talking about a BSN here is 40,000 really ideal help me out is that right or am I being greedy LOL
    I live in GA, But this Job is in Washington.
    Where are you going to be in Washington State? Here in Eastern Washington, the cost of living is lower than it is in Seattle, but it has risen in the last couple of years, and the pay is lower than Seattle. The cost of living in Seattle is outrageous.

    That being said, that seems kind of low, even for Eastern Washington, Spokane. $35 an hour would be (if it was a 8 hour shifts, 40 hour work week) about $67, 200 a year. Experienced nurses in Spokane are making about that. I think that the pay in the Tricities area of Washington (South Central Washington- Richland, Pasco, and Kennewick), pays about the same or even a little more than Spokane, as they are trying to recruit nurses to come down there to work. Hope that helps. PM me if you want to discuss more.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington

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