Patients Refusing Care, then self-medicating - page 2

How can you handle patients self-medicating? I just read this blog entry. Obviously anyone has the right to deny care, but, there's a difference between denying care and downright self... Read More

  1. by   firstyearstudent
    I think there is a big difference between letting a patient who has a long standing condition like diabetes manage it themselves in the hospital and letting patients take controlled substances in the hospital. While insulin does have risks, they would probably be minimal and the nurse could monitor the patient's therapy by either taking their own BS checks or asking the patient to share their information. On the other hand, medications like Dilaudid and Xanax are often abused and can lead to falls.

    The problem I recently ran into was with patient who wanted it both ways. I had a sliding scale for R insulin and she insisted that I give her 2 extra units because she was eating pancakes for breakfast. She'd been managing her diabetes well for over 10 years and I'm sure she was right about it, but I couldn't give her two extra units without a doctor's order.

    Now that I have G.D. and am taking insulin I can see how it makes more sense to have an experienced patient manage their own diabetes rather than doctors and nurses who don't have any where the same level of knowledge of the patient's particular metabolism, diet and eating habits.
    Last edit by firstyearstudent on May 12, '09
  2. by   blondy2061h
    What if the doctor decides they shouldn't be self medicating and they still are? What can be done about that?
  3. by   morte
    Quote from blondy2061h
    What if the doctor decides they shouldn't be self medicating and they still are? What can be done about that?
    document, educate, inform (doc)..... rinse and repeat

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