One month Notice?????

  1. Anyone here heard of working out a one month notice???? I have heard of three weeks at the longest, but pretty much thought 2 weeks was the "standard". This seems strange to me.....
  2. Visit mim-o profile page

    About mim-o

    Joined: Jun '04; Posts: 62; Likes: 7

    26 Comments

  3. by   justme1972
    I have heard of that before. The HR official explanation is so they have plenty of time to search and hire your replacement...however, since most people have found a job and need to work out only a two week notice...it's a political corporate ploy to get you on the DNR list.

    A good employer will tell you this upon hire.

    Dirty, but it's the truth.
  4. by   TazziRN
    The standard is two weeks but each place can require whatever length of time they want.
  5. by   HappyNurse2005
    my hospital has this requirement, and its well published and told to you in orientation. no secret. peole who make over 11 bucks an hour give 30 days notice, undre 11 bucks (or some monetary number close to that) get 2 weeks notice.

    why? don't know. this also counts for transferring departments.
  6. by   CHATSDALE
    always do what you signed up to do if at all possible..you will feel better about youself
  7. by   mim-o
    Well, I was NOT informed of this until the time has arrived. I don't know why this was not a topic at orientation or why I did not think it odd not te be discussed. I should have ask myself-my bad. Don't want to leave anyone hanging-however I don't like feeling decieved.
  8. by   TrudyRN
    How would you have known to ask? Don't be so quick to accept the blame.

    Read your policy manual and see what it actually says. Ours says 15 days. I always thought it was 2 weeks - 14 days but, lo and behold, it's 15.

    How hard will it be for you to give them the month? You don't want to burn bridges if you can possibly avoid it, so maybe work the month but use up some of the hundreds of sick time hours you are probably leaving.
  9. by   Midwest4me
    Giving 4 weeks' notice WAS the standard (in my area of the country)when I started nursing 22 years ago. It was reasoned that that amount of notice was the "professional thing to do", given that nurses are professionals. I've tried to abide by that, usually giving 3-4 weeks' notice but usually the new employer wants me to start right away so I'll give 2 weeks(still feel guilty though).
  10. by   GregRN
    Ack! Companies can REQUEST a 4-week notice, not REQUIRE it. You are not at the mercy of the employer for which you work. If conditions are such that I need to leave to protect myself OR for a substantially better opportunity, I'll take my license and long term health and well-being over a good reference every time.
  11. by   burn out
    I think it would depend on the employer and how well they were to work for. If they were fair to you and you are leaving for a better position that you can not get there and you want to remain amicable then give a month notice. If you got the short end of the stick alot and feel you were not done fairly then give 2 weeks, if you feel that your nursing license are on the line do not go back no notice.
  12. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from GregRN
    Ack! Companies can REQUEST a 4-week notice, not REQUIRE it. You are not at the mercy of the employer for which you work. If conditions are such that I need to leave to protect myself OR for a substantially better opportunity, I'll take my license and long term health and well-being over a good reference every time.
    They CAN "require" it in that they can refuse to provide a reference for you if you don't, and can put you on the DNR list if you haven't given them the notice they have stated is a requirement. If neither is important to you, and you are absolutely certain you won't need anything more from this facility in the future, then maybe it's worth the burned bridge. Foresight is a gift, hindsight is always 20/20.

    My employer asks 3 weeks of professional staff (which means RNs, RTs, PTs, etc), and 4 weeks of management. Two weeks for all else. And they made this darned clear upon hire, or I should say during general orientation. I've seen people be surprised after years of employment that they are expected to give more than two weeks, but it's not like they weren't told this at the start.
  13. by   kittagirl
    In the NHS it's a standard one-month notice for most staff, this is part of your contract.
    In one of my jobs (do a few all part time, keeps me interested and out of trouble:spin: ) as I'm considered management I have to give 3 months notice, and again this is pretty standard. This gives them time to advertise, interview and hopefully for the person leaving to do some job specific training with the new guy.

    On the 'good' side employers have to also give notice to terminate again a month is standard, unless in the case of gross misconduct.

    I have seen the notice period waved occasionally usually when the person was 'leaving' due to promotion
  14. by   Indy
    I gave 3 weeks and was told that the policy of 30 days would not be enforced; I thought 3 weeks was nice and they thought not enforcing it was nice. We don't agree but we're so nice!

close