Ok, I am a little creeped out! - page 2

Hi, So I know there is whole thread on ghost stories, but i figured I would post this since it just happened. I was working as a medic and we picked up a patient who had collapsed. The patient... Read More

  1. by   russianbear
    I'm sorry, I just found the use of "they" when referring to one person very distracting.
  2. by   ArtClassRN
    I find hospital ghost stories insulting.

    These patients are people who died under our care and look how many fellow nurses invent stories and narratives to fit their desire for "spooky tales" or to reinforce their worldview.

    That is shameful. Patients deserve better than that.
  3. by   TheGooch
    Quote from ArtClassRN
    I find hospital ghost stories insulting.

    These patients are people who died under our care and look how many fellow nurses invent stories and narratives to fit their desire for "spooky tales" or to reinforce their worldview.

    That is shameful. Patients deserve better than that.
    Wow. this is just rude.
  4. by   Jensmom7
    Quote from Been there,done that
    Did not even think about a **** contest. Referring to the visions of the dying as "hallucinations".. would then make it all about the attending caregiver. Can't make the assumption , that they are hallucinating.
    You are viewing death as a "Christian "experience. How about the 4 billion people on this planet that are NOT Christian?
    Your replies to many other posts are actually the definition of a pissing contest.

    While I mentioned that I am a Christian and have at times said the Lord's Prayer with patients, I also said that I am respectful of other faiths. I have no desire (or reason) to participate in any "bedside conversions." If you think that I spend time running around the room waving my hands in the air shouting "Hallelujah!" and praising God for giving dead relatives the ability to pave the way to Heaven, not only are you being presumptuous, you need to climb down off your lofty perch of superiority.

    I also stated that I have no idea whether the things people experience as they are dying are hallucinations or actual contact from dead relatives (and you DON'T have to be Christian to believe that). It isn't my job to sort that out.

    My actual point was, no matter what they may be, when it's a comforting experience, there's no reason to want to stop it. You don't have to be religious to accept that.
  5. by   Farawyn
    Quote from ArtClassRN
    I find hospital ghost stories insulting.

    These patients are people who died under our care and look how many fellow nurses invent stories and narratives to fit their desire for "spooky tales" or to reinforce their worldview.

    That is shameful. Patients deserve better than that.
    You can always step out of this thread. Deal with your patients the way you want on his/her death bed. Stop judging others doing the same. It's between the nurse and the patient.
  6. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from Jensmom7
    Your replies to many other posts are actually the definition of a pissing contest.

    While I mentioned that I am a Christian and have at times said the Lord's Prayer with patients, I also said that I am respectful of other faiths. I have no desire (or reason) to participate in any "bedside conversions." If you think that I spend time running around the room waving my hands in the air shouting "Hallelujah!" and praising God for giving dead relatives the ability to pave the way to Heaven, not only are you being presumptuous, you need to climb down off your lofty perch of superiority.

    I also stated that I have no idea whether the things people experience as they are dying are hallucinations or actual contact from dead relatives (and you DON'T have to be Christian to believe that). It isn't my job to sort that out.

    My actual point was, no matter what they may be, when it's a comforting experience, there's no reason to want to stop it. You don't have to be religious to accept that.
    My replies to other posts are not relevant here. My thoughts on what people crossing over see is the point. Your initial post stated they are hallucinations.
    The definition of hallucination is:
    • an experience involving the apparent perception of something not present


    Not perched, not feeling superior. I personally feel when we pass, a loved one is there to guide us over. Calling it a hallucination minimizes my belief.
  7. by   AnnieOaklyRN
    Quote from ArtClassRN
    I find hospital ghost stories insulting.

    These patients are people who died under our care and look how many fellow nurses invent stories and narratives to fit their desire for "spooky tales" or to reinforce their worldview.

    That is shameful. Patients deserve better than that.
    I didn't "invent" any story, but thanks for making assumptions!

    Annie
  8. by   AnnieOaklyRN
    Quote from russianbear
    I'm sorry, I just found the use of "they" when referring to one person very distracting.
    Since you must be so great at english and grammar why don't you offer some suggestions to me!

    Did you ever consider that I was trying to hide the gender of the patient and maybe 'they' was the only word that fit?

    Go teach college english if you want to bother people about grammar instead of doing so on an informal online forum!

    Annie
  9. by   ArtClassRN
    Quote from TheGooch
    Wow. this is just rude.
    Yes, having respect for departed patients by not inventing spooky stories about them is so rude.
  10. by   Farawyn
    Quote from ArtClassRN
    Yes, having respect for departed patients by not inventing spooky stories about them is so rude.
    No, telling someone they are "shameful" because it's not your cup of tea is, though.
  11. by   not2bblue
    Pretty typical, not creepy. He was calling for his wife during a time of great stress and lacking sufficient to his brain, he was likely confused. Out of curiosity, why refer to the patient as "they " and "them"? I'm not trying to be snarky, I just don't understand the importance of not identifying the gender since it doesn't protect the identity of patient simpy by using a gender pronoun. The story alone could be giving out information even if you use gender neutral them. Maybe it is after being repeatedly told by not to use they or them for singular entities it bothers me more than others.
    Last edit by not2bblue on Dec 12, '15 : Reason: Misread
  12. by   russianbear
    Quote from AnnieOaklyRN
    Since you must be so great at english and grammar why don't you offer some suggestions to me!

    Did you ever consider that I was trying to hide the gender of the patient and maybe 'they' was the only word that fit?

    Go teach college english if you want to bother people about grammar instead of doing so on an informal online forum!

    Annie
    Hide the gender? For what reason? My point is merely that we are professionals. There is no reason our correspondence should not reflect that.
  13. by   blondy2061h
    Quote from russianbear
    I'm sorry, I just found the use of "they" when referring to one person very distracting.
    Singular "they" is largely considered acceptable in writing.

    The Washington Post Style Guide Now Accepts Singular ‘They’ | Mental Floss

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