Nursing Faculty Shortage and Salaries

  1. We are all aware that we have a nursing shortage, but we also have a major crisis in regard to nursing faculty shortages all across the country. One of the main reasons for this crisis is the disparity between salary in clinical practice for MSN prepared nurses and the nursing educator role.
    If you would like to contribute to my data base please either post or email me the following info:
    Degree held:
    Educator Role:
    Salary:
    State you work in:
    Type of Institution (College or University)

    There is a movement going on in some parts of the country to equalize the salary between the clinical setting and the educational setting. I look forward to communicating with you!
  2. Visit Rhilogan profile page

    About Rhilogan

    Joined: Jun '09; Posts: 5; Likes: 7
    FNP, Educator
    Specialty: 15 year(s) of experience in Internal Medicine, Nursing Education

    41 Comments

  3. by   mommiof2kids
    Degree Held: BSN
    Educator
  4. by   mommiof2kids
    Degree-BSN
    Educator Role-in house educator
    Salary-55K
    State-TX
    Institution-LVN program (year round program)
  5. by   Whispera
    Degree held: BSEd, BSN, MSN
    Educator Role: clinical instructor for 10 years, part time
    Salary: where I used to work it was 3900 for a 2 credit hour course, but I moved cross-state. I just turned down an offer for 2500 for the same course at a different branch of the same university
    State you work in: Indiana
    Type of Institution: University
  6. by   iteachob
    Degree held: BSN, MSN
    Educator role: Assistant professor (includes both didactic and clinical teaching); 14 years experience (> 10 of that being full-time)
    Salary: 40K (9 month contract)
    State: KY
    Type of institution: 4 year college; our program is 2 year ADN
  7. by   jangraciemom
    No wonder nursing has a shortage of educators can't live on the salary
  8. by   mommyonamission
    I am really shocked at the salaries as I definitely believe they should be higher.
  9. by   Rhilogan
    These salaries are an absolute tragedy! No wonder we have a shortage of faculty!
    We have to stand up and say no......... if the schools do not have nursing educators, they can't produce nurses, they lose money and the nursing shortage becomes even worse. Maybe then people will wake up and realize how valuable we are.
  10. by   iteachob
    Quote from Rhilogan
    These salaries are an absolute tragedy! No wonder we have a shortage of faculty!
    We have to stand up and say no......... if the schools do not have nursing educators, they can't produce nurses, they lose money and the nursing shortage becomes even worse. Maybe then people will wake up and realize how valuable we are.
    Our Division Chair has actually had people (interviewing for an open faculty position) laugh out loud when they heard the salary offered!

    I've learned to look at it as a type of mission work.
  11. by   HouTx
    As an educator, I'm always glad to see this thread come up. University-based faculty are retiring at a very rapid rate with no one to replace them. Those of us who are doctorally prepared (required by most univerisities) can make at least twice as much in the private sector.

    There is an enormous amount of information on this issue - including salary data. We keep asking "why" and getting the same answer, but no one does anything about it.
  12. by   AOx1
    Quote from iteachob
    I've learned to look at it as a type of mission work.

    It is, absolutely. I didn't think anyone made less than I did for a 9-month contract, then I talked to a friend at a different college, and she makes $38,000. The reason I still do it is because I believe strongly in the difference I can make in the students' learning experience and in the future of nursing. Of course, that doesn't stop me from squawking about it and trying to change things internally by showing salary comparisons (and you know how effective that's been, lol). It's sad that I made more as a new grad years ago than as a nurse with years of experience and an advanced degree. A total slap in the face, especially when you include all you do outside the classroom- the clinical prep work and assignments, the researching for lectures, thinking of new ways to teach that are fun and interesting. I usually spend most of my summer and many hours each week that will never be paid.

    Even more pitiful is that there is no real financial incentive to obtain advanced nursing degrees. If I pay out of pocket for my PhD at the institution of my choice, it would cost me an estimated $74,000 for my top choice and $40,000 for my distant second choice, yet upon completion, I will earn a whopping $10,000 more per year. If I have one more person ask me if I "like making the big bucks doing such an easy job" it will not go well for them.

    It is also really hard to hear so many "all instructors are evil" comments when you look at how much most of us care and how much we sacrifice to do what we love to do. I also work a 12 hour shift most weekends to supplement my pay and often full time in the summer.

    As for the shortage, I think the salaries pretty much explain that. If there were truth in advertising, a typical ad might look like this:

    "Come work at School "X" where your advanced degree and dedication will earn you even less than you could ever have imagined. Yes, my dears, you will earn far less than your students do upon graduation." Somewhere in the fine print it would need to mention that the job will be largely thankless, require long hours, and the ability to be both an expert in nursing and in education simultaneously.

    And who wouldn't beat down the door for that promise

    All kidding aside, 99% of the time I love my job and my students, I just think it's time that America in general starts placing a higher value and priority on education.
    Last edit by AOx1 on Jun 23, '09
  13. by   llg
    PhD plus 32 years of clinical and teaching experience.
    Adjunct Associate Professor (while working full time for a hospital)

    Each 3-credit, semester-long course = $3500 -- No benefits and I have to supply my own computer for online course work, clerical supplies, etc.

    I teach because I believe in the importance of what I teach and believe I can teach it better than most people. Also, I hope to ease into retirement someday by quitting my full time hospital job and work as a part time faculty member. This adjunct teaching will give me some experience that might get me a part time faculty position later.
    Last edit by llg on Jun 23, '09
  14. by   RNCEN
    I am shocked at the salaries (or lack of) presented here. What part of the country do you live in??

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