Nursing Faculty Shortage and Salaries - page 3

We are all aware that we have a nursing shortage, but we also have a major crisis in regard to nursing faculty shortages all across the country. One of the main reasons for this crisis is the... Read More

  1. by   iteachob
    Quote from heathersue
    I've wanted to go into nursing education...looks like I'll have to wait until my kids are out of college!
    Well, where I work that is one BIG perk......my child (and my spouse, too) can go to the college I work at tuition free!! Only.....he does not! Luckily he has academic scholarships (not full ride, but they help) where he does go.
  2. by   Rhilogan
    Okay, let's get back to the original request:
    Degree held:
    Where you teach-College or University
    Salary per year:
    State where you live:

    Thanks
  3. by   PostOpPrincess
    $40,000?

    Are you kidding me? That's so much work for what you guys give to the new nurses.

    SO VERY WRONG.
  4. by   PostOpPrincess
    Well, I am going back for an advanced degree but there is no way I would settle for that.

    I make six figures now (NO LIE, I live in SoFLA)...and that is working as a recovery room nurse.

    There is NO WAY I could go back.
  5. by   rngolfer53
    Quote from mommyonamission
    I am really shocked at the salaries as I definitely believe they should be higher.
    I think in most of academia, salaries are pretty poor until one reaches the doctorate level.

    Since the schools aren't spending a lot on faculty, just what is the justification for huge increase in tuition?
  6. by   Tweety
    Quote from llg
    PhD plus 32 years of clinical and teaching experience.
    Adjunct Associate Professor (while working full time for a hospital)

    Each 3-credit, semester-long course = $3500 -- No benefits and I have to supply my own computer for online course work, clerical supplies, etc.

    I teach because I believe in the importance of what I teach and believe I can teach it better than most people. Also, I hope to ease into retirement someday by quitting my full time hospital job and work as a part time faculty member. This adjunct teaching will give me some experience that might get me a part time faculty position later.
    I know you're an excellent insturctor. I know an MSN who makes about $2000.00 per 3-hour course teaching courses in a BSN program, so $3500 actually sounds good....comparatively speaking. It sounds like your pHD is getting you a premium....as it should. I wonder how much an hour though that works out considering the hours you must put in.

    Quote from LiveToLearn
    It is also really hard to hear so many "all instructors are evil" comments when you look at how much most of us care and how much we sacrifice to do what we love to do. I also work a 12 hour shift most weekends to supplement my pay and often full time in the summer.

    All kidding aside, 99% of the time I love my job and my students, I just think it's time that America in general starts placing a higher value and priority on education.

    It's got to be hurtful to have such passion and read some of the posts students post here. It's nice to remember that instructors are human beings with a passion for nursing.


    I make more in my ADN-required charge nurse position than most of the salaries I've seen here, without any overtime or differentials as I work no day shift no weekends and 17 years experience. This is obscene because of the experience needed to teach properly, not to mention the 4 to 10 more years of education required.
  7. by   llg
    Quote from Tweety
    I know you're an excellent insturctor. I know an MSN who makes about $2000.00 per 3-hour course teaching courses in a BSN program, so $3500 actually sounds good....comparatively speaking. It sounds like your pHD is getting you a premium....as it should. I wonder how much an hour though that works out considering the hours you must put in.

    It's got to be hurtful to have such passion and read some of the posts students post here. It's nice to remember that instructors are human beings with a passion for nursing.

    I make more in my ADN-required charge nurse position than most of the salaries I've seen here, without any overtime or differentials as I work no day shift no weekends and 17 years experience. This is obscene because of the experience needed to teach properly, not to mention the 4 to 10 more years of education required.

    Thanks, Tweety. Actually, the $3500 is standard adjunct pay for this type of course because it involves videostreamed lectures plus online work -- as well as having some "live" students in the classroom as I give the lectures. It's such a complex teaching environment that they pay a bonus for it over what would be paid for the same course in a traditional classroom setting. But still ... when you consider that I usually have about 50 students in the class (and all those assignments to grade and e-mails to answer), it DOES require a lot of time.

    I get no extra pay for my PhD either from the school or for my hospital job. In both cases, I occupy job slots that could technically be filled by people with MSN's and the salary scale is geared to the MSN level. There is no premium for the 5 years of doctoral education. That's what is sad ... and it gets to me sometimes.

    Just recently, I was given a new task at my hospital job -- that of Magnet Coordinator -- to add on to my already full time job there. I was not asked if I was interested ... or what resources I would need to accomplish the task ... or anything like that. It was never discussed. I was just told informally that I was the "go to" person for that effort. As I am already at the top of the MSN pay scale because of my extensive experience and seniority at the hospital, there will be no more raises for me even when the other employees get raises. But I love my friends here and there is no other place in town to work... and now is not the time to put myself and my condo on the market.
  8. by   Tweety
    I know what you mean llg, I finally am getting a "BSN required" job away from the bedside. Sad thing is that as I move up, I won't get a raise as I'm already "maxed out".

    You wonder why we don't try to advance ourselves with higher degrees without incentive. I have other incentives for taking this position and I affected the offer, but it would have been nice to not be making the same thing as my ADN required job.

    Getting Magnet status is a LOT of work. Ugh.......
  9. by   kaydee rn
    This forum is so greatly needed. As for the questions posed:

    I have a DNP and teach in a community college in Pa. I have taught nursing for 27 years and make 55000 per year. The starting salary is 40000. Yes, it is appalling as Rhilogan stated. Even more troublesome is the fact that nursing faculty need to work more hours than other disciplines for the same money. Clinical and labs are compensated LESS than theory hours. This de-values clinical education. This "compensation formula" is based on an antiquated system and must be challenged. I urge all nurse educators to work towards getting these inequities changed.
  10. by   JBudd
    Quote from Rhilogan
    Okay, let's get back to the original request:
    Degree held:
    Where you teach-College or University
    Salary per year:
    State where you live:

    Thanks
    MSN
    community college; just 1 two hour credit course/semester
    $30/credit hour, as adjunct faculty
    NM
  11. by   choco80
    I realize this is an older thread, but I will be entering a direct-entry program (I already have a doctorate in another field - law) and am interested in entering academia, perhaps in teaching ethics/policy related courses at a nursing school. I was wondering how many of you guys who do teach have second jobs, work in clinics, etc. to supplement? I echo the sentiment here that the academic salary is way too low, and I was just wondering how many of you take on an additional job? At my school, most of the profs seem to also work at the hospitals as NPs, etc. as well. Thanks!
  12. by   netglow
    I'll just add because I don't read it here, that there is no nursing shortage. The faculty shortage is misconstrued as well. There are too many profit driven nursing programs and too many graduates. I'd seriously consider this before you start off in this direction. Remember all of it is based on money. The people who start this "need for educator" business are the people who want to continue to profit from the big cash easily gained from heavily marketing nursing as a career. I see the tide turning soon for these schools as well. Already around me the census is dropping as word gets out there will be no job once you graduate, but you will still be stuck your loan default.

    Just look at Illinois schools of nursing... scroll down, you see what I mean?

    http://www.nursing.illinois.gov/educ...asp#ACCREDITED
  13. by   mommiof2kids
    I have also seen the tide turning in regards to the "nursing shortage." It's been interesting. What is happening, at least in some parts of the country, is that experienced nurses who were retired are coming out of retirement and re-entering nursing. This has changed the dynamics for new graduate nurses getting hired. Most facilities would prefer to hire an experience RN who has gone through refresher training than a new grad because of the monetary investment in hiring new grads. Additionally, trends are showing that new grads are only staying in the field for 1-2 years and are then leaving the acute care setting. So, financially, it makes sense to hire the experienced nurse.
    In regards to faculty...across the board, faculty are approaching retirement. Colleges (whether public or private) are finding it difficult to recruit new faculty because of the salary. Nurses are nurses first, then educators. It is shocking to go from working 3-12 hour shifts, getting paid for all of your time, to working 5 days a week on a salary, which doesn't capture overtime, missed lunches, weekend time and time spent at home working. It is not appealing to nurses, nor is it necessarily financially possible, to take a pay cut such as what typically occurs in nursing education. Now, educators who work for hospitals make very good money. But to strictly work in the world of academia, plan on taking a pay cut.

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