Nursing and Depression

  1. Can a diagnosis of depression and treatment (in or out patient) for it destroy one's chances of getting RN licensure?

    Thanks for any information you may contribute. :kiss
  2. Visit Kim O'Therapy profile page

    About Kim O'Therapy

    Joined: Sep '05; Posts: 881; Likes: 166
    Nurse; from US
    Specialty: Onc/Hem, School/Community

    16 Comments

  3. by   MissBeehaves
    Not sure where you live, but in TX you can get a license. The application states that you have to disclose any mental illness except major depression. I think this means that you can still get your license even with some other mental illnesses. I have a friend diagnosed as bipolar that got her license. She had to show that she was getting treatment and taking her meds, etc.
  4. by   RENAISSANCE RN
    arent you covered by the ADA if you are treated?
  5. by   Jules A
    There would truly be a nursing shortage if they implemented that restriction!
  6. by   CVICURN2003
    Quote from Jules A
    There would truly be a nursing shortage if they implemented that restriction!
    I was going to say exactly that!!
  7. by   Jo Dirt
    I've got depression bad. See a psychiatrist and everything and I'm an RN.
  8. by   grace90
    Quote from Jules A
    There would truly be a nursing shortage if they implemented that restriction!
    Oh, my goodness! You aren't kidding! If the BONs eliminated every nurse that dealt with depression, anxiety, panic disorder, ADD, bipolar, etc., they'd have a very very very extreme shortage.
  9. by   Kim O'Therapy
    Thanks for your input! I appreciate you taking the time to respond. I have had depression issues off and on throughout adulthood, espsecially after my hysterectomy. But, my mother (who I was very close to) died 11/8/06 and I'm still struggling with it alot. I've been to grief therapy, was put on meds, etc., but sometimes I feel like I need to "check in" because I'm losing my mind.:trout: I have been hesitant to seek further help/treatment d/t being in nursing school.

    Again, thanks for your posts!
  10. by   kstec
    Not that this is any consolation but I've only been a nurse for a short time and I can't even count how many nurses are on medications for depression. If I didn't know any better I'd think it was just part of the nursing/caretaker field. I just speculate that most but not all come from some type of dysfunction and that they are more prone to have depression/anxiety issues. I'm not saying all but alot. I know will take offense but that is not my intention. If you are "normal" bless your heart but for the rest of us, it's comforting to know we're not alone.
  11. by   Seven, RN2b
    Quote from Kim O'Therapy
    Can a diagnosis of depression and treatment (in or out patient) for it destroy one's chances of getting RN licensure?

    Thanks for any information you may contribute. :kiss
    Kim O'Therapy - Thank you for this post. I had been wondering the same thing - but, didn't take the time to ask.
  12. by   bethin
    I don't know about others, but 9 out of 10 of my coworkers are seeing a therapist and/or taking antidepressants and anti anxiety drugs. If you couldn't get a license because you were depressed or seeing a therapist then there would be no nurses. Alot of nurses see therapists to vent their feelings about work. And who isn't depressed from time to time with the things we see?
  13. by   caliotter3
    I met an RN who (as related to me by one of my CNAs who had been at the facility for yrs) broke down on the job, at that very same facility. She was rehired, however, she didn't last one week, b/c she was "scared off" by the behavior of a nurse/nurses who also were made aware of her past, and who were intent on keeping the replacement nurses "among their own". The nurses were quitting one by one, and being replaced by people who knew each other and got along. I was also told by co-workers that they see therapists and are taking anti-depressants. My own doctor told me that it is none of any employer's business what meds any healthcare worker is prescribed and that questionable stuff would only be reported to the board, if in fact, something questionable happens, causing TPTB to question one's ability to do the job. So that's the answer, if you are under a doctor's care and managing any symptoms, and are capable of doing your job, then you should not worry yourself into a tizzy.
  14. by   RENAISSANCE RN
    not only would there be no nurses if you eliminated people, there would be no MD's. I think it is responsible to take care of yourself. It is just like taking insulin for diabetes.

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