Nurses whom give overly detailed reports...

  1. Ideally you have 30 minutes for report, or we do at least, 6:45-7:15. I generally clockin at 18:35 to grab the patient info from the cardexes (Diet, vitals, activities, special notes from doctors, meds, IV site loc/fluids/etc).

    I prompty notify the nurse of this and begin report for "updates", "highlights", "Important info". This works 99% of the time, and I feel it's the most effect report that can be given/done as you don't waste time on the nurse giving you outdated info when the cardex should be updated constantly whenever an order is written if the nurse is doing their job properly.

    But that 1% likes to give EVERY DETAIL. Sits there and reads everything off the kardex to me (which I already have written down), every med to me (I make sure all meds were signed for prior to begining to report), how many times the patient coughed, their complete history medical and personal, every little detail of the day.

    A great report sure, detailed very, but I don't care that the patient ate half an apple with their dinner, or that they coughed a few times when their in for pneumonia.

    Am I the bad nurse for wanting to get a good, yet quick report so I may begin my shift or are they the bad nurse for taking over 30 minutes to give report on 6-7 patients.
  2. Visit Gr8Dane profile page

    About Gr8Dane

    Joined: Jan '08; Posts: 127; Likes: 78
    LPN
    Specialty: Med/Surg

    39 Comments

  3. by   sissiesmama
    Oh, yeah - been there, done that! It just drives me NUTS when they feel like they must give you every minute detail that is not really pertinent to the care of the patient.

    I had one RN who when giving report would even tell you what color nail polish the pt had on her toes. Now, some people may find this little tiidbit useful, but not me. That is not going to change my nursing care in the least.

    Anne, RNC
  4. by   loriangel14
    Hey I hear ya. One nurse that works the 2330-0730 shift where i work will list every time that some used the bedpan or the urinal. " Mary Smith used the bedpan at 0030, 0235, no, make that 0245, 0500 and again at 0700". We do a taped report and half the time hit the fast forward button to skip to the next pt.
  5. by   sissiesmama
    Quote from loriangel14
    Hey I hear ya. One nurse that works the 2330-0730 shift where i work will list every time that some used the bedpan or the urinal. " Mary Smith used the bedpan at 0030, 0235, no, make that 0245, 0500 and again at 0700". We do a taped report and half the time hit the fast forward button to skip to the next pt.
    Sounds liike you an I have worked with some of the same people. I know they mean well, butplease don't take up time telling me things like that and keep me in report when I have a bucket load of patients to get out and see.

    Anne, RNC
  6. by   live4today
    Change of shift report should NOT consist of what is already written for the oncoming nurse to read and take note of. It should only consist of patient stats for the nurse who may have not cared for that patient before, and any changes in orders. Every nurse should be viewing the patients chart whether paper or computer charting for meds due and the times those meds are due, and any labs or other tests that need to be done by the oncoming shift. Report should be kept as brief and pertinent as possible giving respect for the offgoing shift's precious valuable time, and the oncoming shift's ability to begin their patient care as timely as possible.
  7. by   RN1982
    I don't want any crazy details. I just really want to know why the patient is here, their history, and any acute changes throughout the shift. That's it. Spare me the stuff about lines and xrays (unless abnormal), I can look all that stuff up on my own.
  8. by   sissiesmama
    Quote from TurnLeftSide
    I don't want any crazy details. I just really want to know why the patient is here, their history, and any acute changes throughout the shift. That's it. Spare me the stuff about lines and xrays (unless abnormal), I can look all that stuff up on my own.
    Right. The stuff that is pertinent, that I need to be aware of to provide effective patient care, by all means. The other stuff, the "fluff", don't want it, don't need it, ect.

    Anne, RNC
  9. by   mustlovepoodles
    I used to work with a nurse who felt led to comment on the patient's age, race, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, family members, pajamas of the day, and what their BMs looked like. I don't care about any of that; If I want to know someone's age that's easy to look up. All the rest is stuff I don't need to know. Well, except for the BMs. But only if there's blood, pain, or the stool is shaped like Mickey Mouse. I *am* a Disney nut.
  10. by   getoverit
    I hear ya too. In my unit, this is not the case at all....but every once in awhile I get pulled to a telemetry floor and all their reports are like that. I kid you not...it goes on for close to an hour. I've never seen anything like it and it would drive me nuts if I had to listen to that 3-4 times each week.
    We call it "overview" for a reason.
    I used to work with a nurse about 10 years ago, and he would document everytime he adjusted the blanket, or gave a sip of water, or the exact verbatim conversations he would have with a patient. I told him it wasn't thorough so much as it was neurotic. If you didn't know a nurse had written the report you'd think it was a mental health inpatient.
    For report, we give admission and pertinent history, IVs, vent settings, mentation, any meds, imaging, procedures and anything pending (eg. draw a K+ @ 9pm or we turned off the integrillin @ 4pm, etc.). Usually takes us about 5 minutes.
  11. by   twow
    Quote from mustlovepoodles
    I used to work with a nurse who felt led to comment on the patient's age, race, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, family members, pajamas of the day, and what their BMs looked like. I don't care about any of that; If I want to know someone's age that's easy to look up. All the rest is stuff I don't need to know. Well, except for the BMs. But only if there's blood, pain, or the stool is shaped like Mickey Mouse. I *am* a Disney nut.
    Interesting. The program I was in taught us to report patient's age, race, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, family members, and BMs.

    I knew it! I knew my instructors (especially clinical) were worthless!!
  12. by   southernbeegirl
    i used to be one of those nurses that told yall everything about the patient. im sorry. i have seen the error of my ways and have changed my evilness. just wanted yall to know that, lol
  13. by   southernbeegirl
    wait!

    lol, i didnt mean this thread changed me...i realized what i was doing years ago and stopped it. i took report from a nurse just like me and she drove me nuts! thats when i realized i must drive everyone else nuts so i quit.
  14. by   P_RN
    You left out the gossip factor.......that nurse from3 west knows this guy and........then he.....

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