NP discusses MJ on national TV ???? - page 9

I just watched CNN and a nurse practioner(she gave her name) was on the phone giving information about Michael Jackson and what he discussed with her and what medication he was given (not by her) for... Read More

  1. by   tlandrn
    Quote from StrbryJelo
    I was not aware that HIPPA laws protect info after you die. Of course, there are lots of things I'm not aware of. I know medical privilege (md/pt confidentiality) ends with death, so why not HIPPA? To give up info the way this person did can be tacky, but is it violating laws?

    Yes, this is a violation. If you read the Act, it tells you about if the information can cause harm to family members, partners, etc, then it makes the information protected.
  2. by   avillion23
    ok, i am completely in defense of everyone attacking this nurse practitioner. i think everyone should go back and watch what she said again. nowhere does it say anything about her disclosing his treatment. she was consulting him on his diet. he kept asking for diprivan and other prescription pain killers. he is the one at fault, not her. she is just telling about what he asked for, not what he was prescribed or what type of specific treatment he received. it is in no way a violation of hippa. here is a quick blurb from advance voice np website.

    <h1 class=entryviewheading>nurse practitioner who treated michael jackson speaks in his defense

    published july 1, 2009 1:09 pm by jennifer ford
    share
    facebook reddit newsvine del.icio.us digg
    yahoo! buzz linkedin stumbleupon google bookmarks mixx




    the media has been bombarding us with news about michael jackson's death, which hasn't been noteworthy for our blog until today, when california nurse practitioner cherilyn lee spoke up in defense of michael jackson, who lee says sought sedatives from her as a sleep aid but not to abuse. lee had been providing nutrition advice to mj.
    the associated press reported the news about michael's np, who said that michael asked her repeatedly for the iv sedative diprivan, and she refused because of its risks. she also said she feared he'd been able to obtain the drug from another provider.
    the article was a bit murky about whether lee was a registered nurse, an np, or a nutritionist, but it does seem that, according to listings on the california association of nurse practitioners web site, that she is in fact a nurse practitioner.
    lee said she tried repeatedly to educate jackson about the cardiac risks of using the iv sedative but he waved her off.
    lee said she spoke out now to protect jackson:
    lee said she decided to speak out to protect jackson's reputation from what she considers unfounded allegations of drug abuse or shortcomings as a parent.
    "i think it's so wrong for people to say these things about him," she said. "he was a wonderful, loving father who wanted the best for his children."
    it looks like lee did her best to protect and educate him before and after his death.
    </h1>
    please enlighten me as to the specific things she said that were a hippa violation. i don't see it, but i am verry open-minded and willing to learn if i am, in fact, incorrect.
  3. by   dotherightthing
    Quote from avillion23
    ok, i am completely in defense of everyone attacking this nurse practitioner. i think everyone should go back and watch what she said again. nowhere does it say anything about her disclosing his treatment. she was consulting him on his diet. he kept asking for diprivan and other prescription pain killers. he is the one at fault, not her. she is just telling about what he asked for, not what he was prescribed or what type of specific treatment he received. it is in no way a violation of hippa. here is a quick blurb from advance voice np website.

    [b]</h1>
    please enlighten me as to the specific things she said that were a hippa violation. i don't see it, but i am verry open-minded and willing to learn if i am, in fact, incorrect.
    i agree that she did not do much more than recount conversations. she was not specific about his ongoing treatment at all. i really don't see that as a violation. the insomnia that she did mention was well known and she did not reveal any specific treatment. she was not disclosing anything that was not public knowledge. it seemed that he saw some of the drugs as sleep aids, this type of drug seeking is common, many patients feel this way. we commonly use diphenhydramine as a sleep aid - not it's original intent.

    i also believe that she probably spoke out as well because of the allegations that are being tossed about in regard to his health care providers and advisers - i'm sure she realized that having worked with him, some of those carelessly tossed about allegations could hit her. she was making it known that she was not a prescriber. not such a bad idea really. in any case, as i've stated before, i'd rather have a hippa violation than a murder charge.
  4. by   CountyRat
    i guess i am old fashioned. i will not answer any questions about my patients' health, nor recount any conversation that i have had with them. (of course i am not talking about parents of sick children and other obvious exceptions.) i believe that i owe my patients the security of confidentiality, unless specific exceptions exist (plans to harm self or others in the future, family education in preparation for discharge, disclosing information to immediate family members of a patient who cannot make healthcare decisions because of his or her illness, etc.) as for questions from a news broadcaster or interviewer, there is one right answer: no comment! and walk away
  5. by   nursemarion
    Well technically anything a patient says to you is confidential. Remember "need to know"? Does the media and millions of the public have a need to know? No. Perhaps at this point the law does. That is about it. I don't think what she said was that bad, as I have said before. But still, we can't even say whether or not we have cared for a patient. The very fact that she cared for him was confidential. Yes, you do lose a lot of your rights once you are dead, but what she said could be in violation of her practice act and even if no family member chooses to sue, she could be in trouble. I still think that she had consent from the family, who would take a chance on speaking out about this otherwise? We have all said thngs we shouldn't have on occasion, but to the press???
  6. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from TheRedOne
    I was watching the interview on TV, my friend was there and I told him I couldn't believe what she was saying! How is she not in trouble for breaking this confidentiality? It is my understanding that the rules of HIPAA still stand after death, and besides, we have a set code of ethics we adhere to as nursing students and nurses. Sad, she probably just wants her 15 minutes of fame.
    You "hit the nail on the head"! However, you used the first title of the "privacy" bill, before predatory lawmakers, influenced by insurance company and physicians' lobbyists, changed it to HIPPA which is the law, if patients sign it. NOW, what it means, is Health Information Privacy and Portability Act. It assures that information regarding the patient CAN BE GIVEN: all doctors, other nurses, lab, pathology, pharmacy, radiology, billing, etc. in other facilities as well as the one where it was signed, law enforcement officers, courts, prisons, health departments, attorneys, AND insurance companies (so they pay only what is owed for treatment of the patient, and can have the bill for it). As you can see, it's not so much a privacy act, as an instrument for doctors, insurance companies and courts.

    However, the health professionals' oath of confidentiality stands in life and in death of all their patients. Unfortunately that hasn't been legally tested in court, as any professional is told that they must answer questions they are asked in court, honestly. Newspaper reporters and other members of the media who get such a bad rap for their intrusiveness, and loose lips; and fingers on typewriter and computer keyboards, have shown greater concern for their ethical behavior than health care professionals! They have spent jail time due to their refusal to divulge names and places of information they were given in confidence.

    To my knowledge, health professionals haven't challenged the court's authority at all, and have spoken freely about their patients, before and after the institution of HIPPA. Perhaps the publicity regarding the ?NP's lack of regard for her oath, will influence future discrepancies regarding the right of privacy for patients. That's why anonymous HIVab testing at health departments was created. Patients wouldn't have the test done, if there was a chance that it would appear in their caregiver's chart where insurance companies, upon seeing it there (and they do) can refuse their insurance, even when the HIVab test was negative. They assume that risky behavior makes the patient a bad risk! Other STDs patients may have had at any time cause refusal, and high premiums, too.

    So in cases of health care workers' exposure to blood and body fluids, it is best to have anonymous blood tests done, wherein only a number is assigned to a blood specimen, which only the patients themselves have their number. If they give the slip of paper with the number on it, to anyone else, instead of going to get the results themselves, it cannot be given (if the health care worker at the clinic knows what the person looked like, who had the test).

    It's very important that we nurses examine all laws that can effect us. :icon_roll
  7. by   nursemarion
    Actually it is The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), not HIPPA.

close