New Opportunity - Why am I so afraid?

  1. I have been an LPN for 12yrs. Becoming an RN is definitely a goal that I had hoped to achieve by now, however, life has a way of directing its own course. With that being said, I have recently received a job offer for the Medical/Surgical/Telemetry Unit in a hospital just across the state line (roughly a 45min drive). Over the course of my LPN career, I have worked in a variety of settings....Corrections, Geriatrics, Pediatrics and Ambulatory Care. The bulk of my experience has been an Administrative role such as MDS or Clinical Supervisor ( of unlicensed assistive personnel). In my state, LPN's have been phased out of most hospitals and in many clinics as Medical Assistants are able to perform the bulk of tasks in which LPN's perform. I totally get the concept and am not upset about the evolution of the role of LPN's as I was told this was on the horizon while I was in the Practical Nursing program. At the time I figured I would have obtained RN licensure before the phasing out became more pronounced. About a year ago, I began a non-clinical role that is more Pharmacy involved than actual nursing. At the time I was going through a variety of emotions and felt that I had become "burnt out" with nursing. Over time I have found myself missing being a part of a clinical team and playing an active role in patient care. I know that this opportunity is extremely rare and if I don't accept, it may never present itself again. There are so many benefits that this new opportunity will provide and the experience gained will certainly provide as a tremendous resource once I begin a RN program. For many years, I have worked Mon-Fri, 8-5, no weekends/holiday. If I accept the new opportunity, I will be working 7p-7a with every other weekend. This would be a huge shift for my family as we have 4 school-aged children. My husband works 8-5, Mon-Fri, no weekends/holidays so it's comforting to know that he will be able to help with homework, dinner and prepare for bed on the week nights that I will be working. Has anyone else transitioned for Mon-Fri to a shift schedule? What was your experience? Has anyone gone from a Doctor's Office to Hospital? What was your experience? Many people would say that this is a great opportunity and I should grab the bull by the horns and embrace it. But....I'm absolutely terrified and I don't know why. This is what I've wanted and now I'm second guessing it. I appreciate any advice that you may have to offer. Thanks in advance.
  2. Visit LPNx12 profile page

    About LPNx12

    Joined: Jun '18; Posts: 4; Likes: 1

    14 Comments

  3. by   brownbook
    Quote from LPNx12
    I have been an LPN for 12yrs. Becoming an RN is definitely a goal that I had hoped to achieve by now, however, life has a way of directing its own course.

    With that being said, I have recently received a job offer for the Medical/Surgical/Telemetry Unit in a hospital just across the state line (roughly a 45min drive).

    Over the course of my LPN career, I have worked in a variety of settings....Corrections, Geriatrics, Pediatrics and Ambulatory Care. The bulk of my experience has been an Administrative role such as MDS or Clinical Supervisor ( of unlicensed assistive personnel). In my state, LPN's have been phased out of most hospitals and in many clinics as Medical Assistants are able to perform the bulk of tasks in which LPN's perform.

    I totally get the concept and am not upset about the evolution of the role of LPN's as I was told this was on the horizon while I was in the Practical Nursing program. At the time I figured I would have obtained RN licensure before the phasing out became more pronounced. About a year ago, I began a non-clinical role that is more Pharmacy involved than actual nursing.

    At the time I was going through a variety of emotions and felt that I had become "burnt out" with nursing. Over time I have found myself missing being a part of a clinical team and playing an active role in patient care.

    I know that this opportunity is extremely rare and if I don't accept, it may never present itself again. There are so many benefits that this new opportunity will provide and the experience gained will certainly provide as a tremendous resource once I begin a RN program. For many years, I have worked Mon-Fri, 8-5, no weekends/holiday. If I accept the new opportunity, I will be working 7p-7a with every other weekend. This would be a huge shift for my family as we have 4 school-aged children. My husband works 8-5, Mon-Fri, no weekends/holidays so it's comforting to know that he will be able to help with homework, dinner and prepare for bed on the week nights that I will be working.

    Has anyone else transitioned for Mon-Fri to a shift schedule? What was your experience? Has anyone gone from a Doctor's Office to Hospital? What was your experience? Many people would say that this is a great opportunity and I should grab the bull by the horns and embrace it. But....I'm absolutely terrified and I don't know why. This is what I've wanted and now I'm second guessing it. I appreciate any advice that you may have to offer. Thanks in advance.
    Hi, if you could use paragraphs in your post it is easier on the eyes, and the readers comprehension.

    It is very scary to change. What you are feeling is normal.

    I could be wrong but maybe you find is scary, with all your experience, to work in a job where you will almost feel like a new grad with no experience. Will they expect you to function easily and efficiently because of your work history? Will they understand that this type of work is different from what you have done, will they treat you like a new grad? What have they offered for orientation?

    The family, work hours, will take some getting used to. You husband sounds like a great guy. It may be difficult and take some adjusting. If everybody can keep a positive attitude and "can do" attitude hopefully the kinks will get worked out.
  4. by   LPNx12
    Quote from brownbook
    Hi, if you could use paragraphs in your post it is easier on the eyes, and the readers comprehension.

    It is very scary to change. What you are feeling is normal.

    I could be wrong but maybe you find is scary, with all your experience, to work in a job where you will almost feel like a new grad with no experience. Will they expect you to function easily and efficiently because of your work history? Will they understand that this type of work is different from what you have done, will they treat you like a new grad? What have they offered for orientation?

    The family, work hours, will take some getting used to. You husband sounds like a great guy. It may be difficult and take some adjusting. If everybody can keep a positive attitude and "can do" attitude hopefully the kinks will get worked out.
    Thank you for the editing tip....the paragraphs definitely make a difference.

    In my heart of hearts I undoubtedly know that the fear of being inadequate or failing is the biggest obstacle between where I am and where I want to be. (Whew, I admitted it, I feel a bit relieved). Thank you for helping me to feel comfortable saying that. I am truly as fearful as I am excited.

    Orientation would be 8 weeks with a preceptor and the CNO will send me to the OR for a few days to refresh my IV skills. It seems to be a supportive environment for transition where there is a learning curve.

    My father has battled Cancer and 2 heart attacks over the past 2 years. With each hospital stay or acute visit, I found myself telling both him and my mom, " I want that to be me" (referring to the outstanding nurses who provided care). I had sheer admiration in my eyes, as if a little kid looking up to their hero. I desperately want to be a great nurse, but unlike the greatness in the areas I've mastered thus far. All of that came fairly easy to me and ultimately mundane. I want to be in the thick of things, the adrenaline, the critical thinking.... feeling as though I am making a difference.


    What if I fail......but what if I fly???? Thank you for assuring me that fear of change is normal. I feel a heightened sense of confidence in moving forwards and accepting the opportunity to grow.
  5. by   brownbook
    I hope your father is doing okay?

    You are an inspiration to me.

    I love your quote. I know I have heard it before, but today it really resonates with me.

    Thanks.
  6. by   LPNx12
    Quote from brownbook
    I hope your father is doing okay?

    You are an inspiration to me.

    I love your quote. I know I have heard it before, but today it really resonates with me.

    Thanks.

    He is....thank you so much. 1.5yrs Cancer free and no lingering physical effects from the heart attacks. He is one of my biggest supporters and I am definitely his biggest fan.

    All the more reason why I need to elevate myself and not hesitate on furthering my aspirations professionally...I want him to see what I am truly capable of...there so much greatness in me. (Anxiety is a beast)

    I can't thank you enough for being a positive and encouraging voice amidst my internal chaos and confusion. I will definitely keep you posted on my journey.
  7. by   cleback
    Honestly, I would think real hard about giving up m-f hours to go back to evenings, nights, and every other weekend hours. Only you can decide if the career change negates missed time with family, but that's a really common reason for nurses to leave acute care. I'm concerned once the newness of the job wears off (even trauma can become routine), you may regret the time lost with your family. But then again, I am not you and we may have different priorities and needs (meant in total sincerity). Best of luck to you in whatever you decide.
    Last edit by cleback on Jun 19
  8. by   Been there,done that
    Read the many threads here about the stress of med-surg nursing. Feel free to join in the fracas, for some imagined glory.
    Between 12 hour midnights and RN studies... expect to see very little of those kids.
  9. by   BlinkyPinky
    I agree with BTDT poster. I wouldn't do it but that's me
    I just now obtained employment with a M-F , daytime schedule and no weekends AND I'm over 50. Took that long to be able to
    I d do the old pen & paper , pros and cons routine , if you haven't already.
  10. by   nursel56
    I really am sensing that you want to go for it, and that if you don't, you might wish you had. So my gut reaction would be to say that yes, there are risks to every major life change, so take a deep breath and do it.

    I personally have gone to the hospital to the clinic to the doctor's office and back to the bedside taking care of vent dependent patients. I lived to tell the tale but some of these transitions had me terrified beforehand.

    I remember one of my options was going to be doing inpatient care at a cancer hospital. It didn't work out, but the nursing staff was well aware it had been a long while since I had a full assignment and were willing to hire me anyway.

    As you mentioned, your family is supportive and your kids are older. Without that, the stress of a new job would be harder to deal with.

    Anyway, if you decide to take this step, let us know how it's going if you can. Best wishes!
  11. by   triciam888
    Comment on activating RN license.....In the sometimes backward state of Tennessee, that make it so easy to reenter the nursing profession. As there was no refresher course near me or close to the time frame that I was working on, I was allowed to take courses online, which I found fascinating! I had been out of nursing for 11 1/2 years to raise my kids and once they left home I was able to return to nursing. Interesting enough the hardest part of returning was how much the business structure of hospitals had changed and the lack of supportive services. I was so challenged and disregarded by my peers, but the reality was that I still had my skills and knowledge and the fact that I had stepped down a bit in the level of nursing care, I actually had more knowledge and experience than most of those I worked with. Time will be your friend in situations like this. I am thinking many folks can relate to my experience.

    Today I have an amazing job that challenges me each day and where all that experience serves me well. I work as an IBCLC and as an RN in the NICU prn. Most of my job is about encouraging, floating, and simply tweeking!

    Today most hospitals are part of Corp. America and are very top heavy, not caring about staff and even about clients, or patients....It is all about the bottom line profit!

    Still, if you have the giftings that nurses have, then you can still thrive in these places!
  12. by   Swellz
    I totally understand. I have a "need" to work in an ICU. I know it's not rainbows and unicorns but it is a professional goal of mine and if I leave nursing without having done it, at least for a little while, I'll feel like I missed something. Personally, just reading your responses makes me excited for you! You are definitely going to have a lot of skills that will apply from your experience, but you are going to need a whole new skill set in med-surg. I do agree with others who stated it will be a big adjustment for you schedule-wise, especially taking RN school into account. But, if this is a personal goal for you, I think it's fabulous that you have this opportunity. There will probably never be a perfect time to do it, but if this situation works for you and your family, then go for it.
  13. by   WestCoastSunRN
    My first question, is -- is it even possible to do an RN program if you are working M -F 9-5? When will you be able to go to class and clinicals? This is the beauty of 12 hour shifts, IMO.

    Also -- people who work 12 hour night shifts still see their children. I agree that it will be hard once you start school, but that would be the case no matter what kind of work schedule you have.

    The reality is that if you are interested in clinical,inpatient nursing (and all that comes with that), you are going to need to embrace 12 hour shifts (I am sure there are still 8 hour hospital shifts somewhere, but not around me). The other reality is that many acute care nurses need to start on night shift with a new institution and/or unit -- and work their way to days if that's what they want.

    The opportunity before you does sound like a good one -- IF acute care nursing is what you want to do. I don't think there are many folks who will argue against the fact that acute care nursing (maybe especially med surg) is some of the hardest work on the planet if done well. Some systems support bedside staff better than others and it can be HIGHLY frustrating when the powers-that-be do not intervene on behalf of safer and higher quality patient care when they absolutely have the power to do so. That is the environment you are talking about entering into. You should be well informed.

    That said, I personally am very happy as a nurse in acute care. I enjoy being part of a team and doing meaningful work. I enjoy having a job that is just as physical as it is cognitively stimulating. Over the years I have developed a high level of skill and knowledge. At some point my body will tire of the physical demands of the bedside and I will be well poised to move on to something different. That is the beauty of nursing.

    Life involves risks. Risks are risks because there's no guarantee. Blessings to you as you make this decision.
  14. by   Leader25
    ​Sorry but your post is one giant run on sentence, I dont have the energy to decipher, try reposting,please.

close