Need some input please.

  1. I am an aspiring nurse at 46. I've been working as an Ophthalmic Technician for 14 yrs and decided to pursue a career in the same field but more in depth caring for patients. I came across Chamberlain University while I'm searching for universities and community colleges. They are offering a BSN degree in 3 yrs at a cost. Factoring in my age and the mandated situation in hospitals for ADNs to acquire their BSNs. Would you recommend paying 88K for a Bachelor's degree? We are not rich by any means , just a very supportive husband.
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  2. Poll: Are you willing to pay 88K for a Bachelor’s degree?

    • Definitely!

      5.41% 2
    • Reconsider your options.

      32.43% 12
    • It’s not worth it.

      62.16% 23
    37 Votes
  3. Visit Pjones71 profile page

    About Pjones71

    Joined: Dec '17; Posts: 11; Likes: 10

    45 Comments

  4. by   cleback
    What are your other options? 88k is a lot. I paid 24k for a bsn.
  5. by   beekee
    I paid less than $15k for my ADN, BSN and MSN. And I started my ASN after age 40 and did all three degrees in 3 years. At your age, and really, at any age, $88k is way too much.
  6. by   Ambersmom
    $88k seems awfully expensive for a bsn, I think mine going to a commuter school was half of that, probably less than half of that. I would explore other programs cost before committing.
  7. by   beekee
    Have you done the math to figure out much the monthly loan payments will be? It's around $900 per month for 10 years if you borrow $88,000. That's $900 per month you are not contributing towards retirement. Depending on your wage when you start, that could be one week a month or more you'll be working for that loan payment.
  8. by   Pjones71
    ]I paid less than $15k for my ADN, BSN and MSN. And I started my ASN after age 40 and did all three degrees in 3 years. At your age, and really, at any age, $88k is way too much.



    I feel that with me starting late at my age 3 yrs for getting a BSN might be worth it. I have to wait for acceptance in the Fall for my ADN in the community college I'm in. But defenitely getting some advise from actual nurses is enlightening me. Thanks!
  9. by   Pjones71
    My other option is to stay at the Community College I'm in and wait until Fall to start the nursing program if I get accepted.
  10. by   Pjones71
    Thank you. I'm seriously considering it and I know 88K is a lot of money but for something that I've really wanted I would risk it. But your input is enlightening me. I appreciate it.
  11. by   Pjones71
    beekee.
    I haven't really done the math. I just don't want to waste anymore time waiting to get accepted in my Community College which will be in the Fall of next year. I've attempted to get in the ADN program in 2008 but life happened and so I'm retrying. For my dream to come true for 88K, it's really tempting.
  12. by   TruvyNurse
    Heck no!! I paid 28k for my BSN at a private school for 4 years of education. 88k is outrageous and a rip off.
  13. by   LovingLife123
    You may have this dream to become a nurse, but don't you dream of retirement one day? $900 a month for student loans is insane. Depending on where you live, that could be one entire paycheck a month.

    Not worth it.
  14. by   missmollie
    Get your ADN. Hospitals often pay some or all of RN-BSN tuition once hired. I paid a grand total of 10k for my ADN (including some living expenses). Thus far for my BSN I've paid 1k, and I only have one more semester left. Consider this, if you get your ADN, you can start working much sooner (2 years) and pay less in student loans. You can do your RN to BSN online while working, get experience in the field, and go from there.
  15. by   AJJKRN
    Quote from Pjones71
    My other option is to stay at the Community College I'm in and wait until Fall to start the nursing program if I get accepted.
    So why not start knocking out your general education credits while you wait.

    There are many things to consider like the NCLEX pass rates of the respective schools, if each school is accredited, time, and of course, costs.

    Research your area. I'm not sure what you're currently making with your experience but you may discover that it will not be financially beneficial to pursue nursing. Depending on whether you live in a congested area or not even having a BSN may not equate to a job. And if you don't live in a congested area, having your ADN/ASN may be sufficient as a new grad.

    Please, please, please do your research though because if the NCLEX isn't passed then you will still have student loans to pay. If you're not hired regardless of the degree upon graduation, there will still be student loans to pay. If a non-accredited school is chosen, then the nursing license will not transfer to other states if one chooses to move. You see a trend in the woes one must consider that schools most likely won't tell you up front before they take your hard-earned money even with being an adult learner!

    Oh damn, forgot to say to stay away from for-profit schools too!

    (I know you're an educated adult, I was too when I first started my nursing journey and these are all things I had to find out on my own.)

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