Need research for locked ICU doors

  1. Hello all, I'm pretty new to this site...actually just stumbled upon it earlier today while trying to find some blasted research. I am a CNA in an ICU on days and we are constantly bothered and interrupted by immense flows of visitors and families. We used to be able to lock our doors most of the day, but the hospital management decided that we needed to be a more open facility, despite the protests from the actual workers of the units.

    My boss has said the upper management would rethink their decision about the open door policy if the staff can provide research and information on locked door units. I suppose they are interested in seeing if a locked ICU has the same efficiency AND family satisfaction as an open ICU. I've been on google for a couple hours now and haven't found much in the way of "research".

    Please, If anyone knows of any data, it would be immensely beneficial, since we might be able to close our doors once more. Thanks!
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    About KoenigCNA

    Joined: Jun '09; Posts: 1; Likes: 2

    6 Comments

  3. by   lindarn
    Quote from KoenigCNA
    Hello all, I'm pretty new to this site...actually just stumbled upon it earlier today while trying to find some blasted research. I am a CNA in an ICU on days and we are constantly bothered and interrupted by immense flows of visitors and families. We used to be able to lock our doors most of the day, but the hospital management decided that we needed to be a more open facility, despite the protests from the actual workers of the units.

    My boss has said the upper management would rethink their decision about the open door policy if the staff can provide research and information on locked door units. I suppose they are interested in seeing if a locked ICU has the same efficiency AND family satisfaction as an open ICU. I've been on google for a couple hours now and haven't found much in the way of "research".

    Please, If anyone knows of any data, it would be immensely beneficial, since we might be able to close our doors once more. Thanks!
    It never ceases to amaze me, how upper management thinks its OK for the nursing staff to maintain an, "open door policy", while they are locked in offices in the bowels of the hospital basement. Accessible to no one.

    How about the nurses institute an "open door policy", for the management and administration? They can see how "therepeutic" it is for family members to barge in on them while they are eating their lunch, or phoning their wives to tell them that they will not be home for dinner, or having family members go throught the executive refrigerator, as family members eat the lunch that they just had delivered from the local restaurant, etc.

    You would see how long this "open door policy" would last! JMHO and my NY $0.02.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  4. by   mappy
    LOL at Lindarn's response - I'd love to see that too!

    I wonder if the reason you're having a problem finding research is the small number of ICUs that are not locked? I've never worked at a hospital that didn't have locked doors. There is likely a lot of research on visiting hours, openness to families, etc., but it really makes me wonder why a hospital would want to make it harder to screen visitors (HIPAA, infection control, security, etc.).

    Good luck!
  5. by   wooh
    I always find it really hard to feel bad for ICU staff when the floors always have open doors. You learn to deal with it.
  6. by   nurse0730
    have locked doors, and would not have it any other way..
  7. by   **LaurelRN
    I've worked in 2 different hospitals..both have locked icu's with scheduled visitation times (except for extenuating circumstances) and our families LOVE us!!
  8. by   nursalicious
    The doors are locked in the ICU where I work except during visiting hours. We also have a paid employee, a patient-family liaison is her actual title if I recall correctly. During visiting hours, she ensures that every single person wash his/her hands before walking any farther as well as making sure children under 12 y.o. do not come into the unit. She has several other duties like helping families find their loved one's room, giving them the card with the telephone number and visiting hours, the patient's privacy code, etc. She also makes sure everyone is OUT OUT OUT when visiting hours are over. She is very appreciated for her work. Administration did away with this position for a while and chaos ensued. Needless to say, every unit needs a person in this position.

    As for research on closed units, I'm afraid I can't help you. I just know it's safer for critical care patients and their nurses/techs to have as little distractions as possible for the most competent care.

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