Magnet behind nurses station?

  1. Good evening, my professor said that most healthcare facilities have some sort of magnet either behind the nurses station or over the medication room door... she wanted me to look up the meaning of it for tomorrow but the only thing I can find is that it relates to a facility being magnet status... I feel that is not the answer however. Can someone help me please.
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  2. Visit Pharmahaulic profile page

    About Pharmahaulic

    Joined: Jan '17; Posts: 47; Likes: 6

    32 Comments

  3. by   klone
    I say your professor is full of beans.

    Most facilities are not magnet status, so I would say that it has nothing to do with it.

    I've worked at many facilities, and I've never heard of this phenomenon.
  4. by   sunflower3,RPN
    Not a real magnet, referring to the pull of nurses congregating @ the med cabinet or @ the nurses station. What she's trying to teach you is that some nurses spend "idle" time (seriously what is that) being idle and socializing. As a new nurse, don't follow the herd...always find something to do and it will keep your nose clean.
  5. by   Anonymous865
    (S)he may be referring to the electromagnetic door locks that are used pretty extensively throughout business. If you swipe your card in a door card reader, you release an electromagnetic lock. If you press a button beside a door to allow you to open a door, you are releasing an electromagnetic lock.

    I don't know why a nursing instructor would be concerned about that though...
  6. by   Guy in Babyland
    Is she referring to the round pacemaker magnet that is used to put a pacemaker into asynchronous mode?
  7. by   Pharmahaulic
    Quote from Guy in Babyland
    Is she referring to the round pacemaker magnet that is used to put a pacemaker into asynchronous mode?
    Oh possibly, what is the purpose of this?
  8. by   NurseSpeedy
    So, another instructor giving a crazy 'research' assignment to a student that should be using their time studying for a test? I had one of those for my LPN. We learned to never ask her a question in clinical or we would have to write a 'research' paper for it the next day and study for our test. This was also years ago before the internet had any valuable resources to look up the information with...and even if you did find something to read it would take about 12 hours to load on the desktop.

    Honestly, I have no idea what she is talking about with the magnet.
  9. by   crazin01
    I've always see a magnet on every code cart. If patient expires, a flat line monitoring strip is required for the chart.
  10. by   JKL33
    Quote from sunflower3,RPN
    Not a real magnet, referring to the pull of nurses congregating @ the med cabinet or @ the nurses station. What she's trying to teach you is that some nurses spend "idle" time (seriously what is that) being idle and socializing. As a new nurse, don't follow the herd...always find something to do and it will keep your nose clean.
    What?!

    If nurses congregate at the med cabinet it's because....only one person can use it at a time. Those who also need to use it tend to stay in the area so they can use it next.

    As for the nurse's station...I don't see a lot of congregating and socializing there (or anywhere) these days (disclaimer: yes, I'm sure some do, somewhere...)
  11. by   Davey Do
    babe-magnet-jpg
  12. by   saskrn
    Quote from Davey Do
    babe-magnet-jpg
  13. by   Guy in Babyland
    Quote from Pharmahaulic
    Oh possibly, what is the purpose of this?
    Magnets are often used for prevention of inhibition during surgery, transtelephonic monitoring (TTM) battery test, or patient collection of stored electrograms or snapshots.
  14. by   brownbook
    Quote from Pharmahaulic
    Oh possibly, what is the purpose of this?
    Waaaaay above my pay grade, Google...Open Anesthesiology....Pacemaker & electrocautery.

    But I think Davy Do has the answer your professor was looking for (or at).

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