LPN

  1. Just wondering if the job market for LPNs is growing as much as I've heard it is. Reading an article right now that it's up 16% or something, but other articles say the exact opposite and they aren't being hired.
    I didn't want to go into LPN school, but I'm considering the option again, because I had gone through 3 semesters of nursing school before failing the program, and don't want to let that training and schooling go to waste.
    For those of you who are LPNs or have been ... is it just as stressful as being an RN? Do you like it, hate it, wish you'd done something else, couldn't see yourself doing anything else?
    I think one of the weak points that really caused me to suffer during nursing school was a weak foundation of A&P2 and the Bio's ... which are obviously important.
    Thanks for any input!
  2. Visit jphill15 profile page

    About jphill15

    Joined: Mar '18; Posts: 14; Likes: 4
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    8 Comments

  3. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from jphill15
    Just wondering if the job market for LPNs is growing as much as I've heard it is. Reading an article right now that it's up 16% or something, but other articles say the exact opposite and they aren't being hired.
    I didn't want to go into LPN school, but I'm considering the option again, because I had gone through 3 semesters of nursing school before failing the program, and don't want to let that training and schooling go to waste.
    For those of you who are LPNs or have been ... is it just as stressful as being an RN? Do you like it, hate it, wish you'd done something else, couldn't see yourself doing anything else?
    I think one of the weak points that really caused me to suffer during nursing school was a weak foundation of A&P2 and the Bio's ... which are obviously important.
    Thanks for any input!
    Your location is of number one importance ...unless you're willing to move absolutely anywhere.
  4. by   jphill15
    I'm originally from NY, just moved to Maine a couple months ago but temporarily, and I would go back to NY to go to school, since I'm still a NY resident.
  5. by   Scottishtape
    I agree with Sour Lemons, it really depends on where you're at. In areas of satruation, RNs are having a hard time finding work, which trickles down to LPNs, however in areas of shortage, LPNs are being brought back into areas they had been taken out of. Example: when I first moved to Florida as an LPN, I couldn't get into the ED as a nurse, but they would hire me to function as a tech. I said no. As the shortage continued in my area, I saw some EDs beginning to hire LPNs in the scope of a nurse, not a tech.

    As far as being an LPN, I was very happy as an LPN for a long time. Again, this changed when I moved to Florida. I began to be treated differently due to my scope of practice narrowing considerably with the move. I began to chafe at the restrictions I had when I changed states and I felt stuck since I wasn't able to work in areas I was interested in. That was the point where I decided to bridge. I am very happy I did because now I see how much I've learned and grown as a nurse, which has blasted doors open for me in the world of nursing.

    Being an LPN can be just as stressful as being an RN. It really depends on the job you have, your coworkers, and your ability to handle stress in the first place. I would never tell someone not to become an LPN, but I would caution people to be sure what their area is like for LPNs, what is the scope of practice for LPNs in your area and consider whether you're ok with the restrictions you will face. Also, think about the areas you want to work in. Are these areas that LPNs *regularly* work in? Everyone can come up with a story of how XYZ LPN got a job in QRS, but it is not the norm. Then, you become an LPN to get into said area, can't get in, and are upset.

    Both LPN and RN programs take commitment, so do your due diligence and make an informed decision so you won't face regret, wasted time, and wasted money.

    Good luck!
  6. by   Davey Do
    Quote from jphill15
    For those of you who are LPNs or have been ... is it just as stressful as being an RN? Do you like it, hate it, wish you'd done something else, couldn't see yourself doing anything else?!
    One reason that I went into nursing because a couple of people who I really respect said I would be good at it. I didn't want to commit myself to becoming an RN and tried LPN first. I enjoyed nursing and working as an LPN. RN seemed like the next logical step due to money and increased opportunities.

    I haven't regretted my decisions.

    Good luck to you, jphill!
  7. by   KelRN215
    Quote from jphill15
    I'm originally from NY, just moved to Maine a couple months ago but temporarily, and I would go back to NY to go to school, since I'm still a NY resident.
    I would not expect the job market for LPNs to be increasing in New York. Not really in Maine, for that matter, either unless you're talking about way up north in Potato land.
  8. by   djh123
    As some others have said, where you are might be a big factor re: demand. But just a FYI: I work at a 'transitional rehab' where there are RN's and LPN's, and the LPN's pretty much do the same job I do. I'm often a charge nurse with 1-3 LPN's working with me.
  9. by   jphill15
    Quote from Scottishtape

    Being an LPN can be just as stressful as being an RN. It really depends on the job you have, your coworkers, and your ability to handle stress in the first place. I would never tell someone not to become an LPN, but I would caution people to be sure what their area is like for LPNs, what is the scope of practice for LPNs in your area and consider whether you're ok with the restrictions you will face. Also, think about the areas you want to work in. Are these areas that LPNs *regularly* work in? Everyone can come up with a story of how XYZ LPN got a job in QRS, but it is not the norm. Then, you become an LPN to get into said area, can't get in, and are upset.

    Both LPN and RN programs take commitment, so do your due diligence and make an informed decision so you won't face regret, wasted time, and wasted money.

    Thank you for this feedback. I believe that I can handle stress pretty well, but I had not considered the questions you raised and I will definitely look into that. I do not want to get into this and then decide halfway through it isn't for me.
    Thanks!
  10. by   Jedrnurse
    Quote from Davey Do
    One reason that I went into nursing because a couple of people who I really respect said I would be good at it. I didn't want to commit myself to becoming an RN and tried LPN first. I enjoyed nursing and working as an LPN. RN seemed like the next logical step due to money and increased opportunities.

    I haven't regretted my decisions.

    Good luck to you, jphill!
    That's a great idea. If people aren't entirely sure about the profession, a shorter program i.e. practical nursing would be a good way to determine if that's the direction to go in.

    That being said, I have been hearing about the 'phasing out' of LPNs since before I became a nurse many years ago. It hasn't happened wholesale, but there are fewer and fewer opportunities...

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