Looking for some advice before making a mistake. - page 6

Okay to start this discussion I would like to first explain and introduce myself. I'm a 22 year old male Firefighter who has been on the job for about a year and a half now. As everyone probably... Read More

  1. by   Lev <3
    Quote from Hannah Hickerson
    Shut up. I wasnt talking about you get over yourself. I was talking about the first several posts. Mind your own business because you are getting all offended when
    it had absolitely nothing to do with you or criticizing you. People are RUDE and were rude in their condescending responses to this poster. Think what you desire. Im wasting time and cant get it back. Pointless argument right now and pointless words being thought and emotions felt. So pointless. Moving on now.

    Reported
  2. by   italianlifter
    Hello Studentnurse365,
    Thank you for your post and giving me your advice which is greatly appreciated. I would like to first say to everyone that has recently posted something, my intentions when I first started this thread was to just get an idea of what would be my best option while receiving great advice for experienced medical personal. Felt at the beginning that it started off bad but then eventually everything calmed down and everyone was giving great advice and working with me which I felt was heartwarming and honestly I received more then I should of and I cant begin to thank everyone here. Just recently there have been a couple post that just seemed unnecessary due to that fact that it started to turn into an argument with people on this thread and honestly I don't want it to come down to that and would like everyone to try and get along and I don't wanna sound rude when I say this but if you can't post anything nice then you do not have to post anything in the first place. I understand everyone means well and wanna give there advice but all I ask is that when you do be mature about it cause not everyone will agree with each other, thats why this thread was made to listen to everyones opinions.

    Now that I said all that I would like to respond, firstly the ADN route might be the cheapest route and I can totally understand your advice and what you are coming from but I would also like to mention that if I do decide to go the PA route which sounds more along the lines of my career field I might as well just get my Bachelors and hopefully get into a PA school even though it is very competitive. The only thing I am concerned about with the PA school is not getting in and then kinda feeling lost at that point. I'm not saying that NP is a lot easier or a better route by any means but what I am going to say is at least when I become a BSN and decide to to become a NP, I can at least get into the school and have a chance of passing the school. Its hard to choose between the two careers though and what is truly stressing me out is the new semester for school starts in October and I have a little less then a month to make my decision so I can start to sign up for school. I understand Im the only one who can make my own decision and no one else can but thats why I started this thread, just to hear everyones advice. Worse case scenario I can always join the military after I receive my degree but we will see.
  3. by   futurecnm
    Quote from italianlifter
    Hello leg,
    I wanna first start off by saying I appreciate you being honest and I agree with everything you said. I do wanna explain to you that I think you have misunderstood me about "looking for the easy way out." I'm certainly not looking for the easy way out by any means. What I mean by not worth it is im more worried about making a bad descsion. I'm more worried about going into all that debt that I end up not being able to pay it all back and receiving bad credit. Im not a cocky person by any means when I say I am very good with money and using my money. Just makes me very nervous seeing that I can end up in 100-150k grand debt for a 90k degree. That just makes me fairly nervous. I have no problem putting in the hardwork for something as long as it will be worth it. That does not make me lazy or a person looking for the easy way out.
    go to a community college. You won't be in debt more than 10k for a RN.
  4. by   NurseInspired
    In regards to the concerns that you have listed in your question:

    1. You don't like to watch someone pee or do not want to bath a patient = Every career has things about it that are undesirable, some nurses don't like vomit and others can't take the smell of poop - you just deal with it and do the best that you can to help your patient. Just remember that no one loves every last thing about their job.

    2. Long hours = Nurses have very flexible schedules, you will have a lot of different choices. Some nursing positions require long hours and over time, other positions do not.

    3. If you are worried about the expense of going to college, there is nothing wrong with going to a community college. There are a lot of excellent nurses that have received their degree from community college nursing programs. In the end, you take the same NCLEX exam for licensing.
  5. by   Julius Seizure
    Didnt know it was only doctorate now. Learned something new!
  6. by   CrunchRN
    Go for nursing. Many avenues and can be done cheaply and you can get tuition assistance from employers as you progress to your ultimate goal.
  7. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from Carabella
    As I was reading your message, the thought popped into my head that being a PA might be a great choice! Look at it this way, the time will pass any way, and you will then gave a great career. The market for PAs will be huge in upcoming years...
    This is true. It took me a long time to decide what I wanted....and I still wasnt 100% sure when I made the decision. But, for me at least, I decided that I could keep "trying to decide" and be in the same spot 3 years later, or I could just pick a direction and start moving. At least in 3 years, I will be somewhere else.
  8. by   Studentnurse365
    Quote from italianlifter
    Hello Studentnurse365,
    Thank you for your post and giving me your advice which is greatly appreciated. I would like to first say to everyone that has recently posted something, my intentions when I first started this thread was to just get an idea of what would be my best option while receiving great advice for experienced medical personal. Felt at the beginning that it started off bad but then eventually everything calmed down and everyone was giving great advice and working with me which I felt was heartwarming and honestly I received more then I should of and I cant begin to thank everyone here. Just recently there have been a couple post that just seemed unnecessary due to that fact that it started to turn into an argument with people on this thread and honestly I don't want it to come down to that and would like everyone to try and get along and I don't wanna sound rude when I say this but if you can't post anything nice then you do not have to post anything in the first place. I understand everyone means well and wanna give there advice but all I ask is that when you do be mature about it cause not everyone will agree with each other, thats why this thread was made to listen to everyones opinions.

    Now that I said all that I would like to respond, firstly the ADN route might be the cheapest route and I can totally understand your advice and what you are coming from but I would also like to mention that if I do decide to go the PA route which sounds more along the lines of my career field I might as well just get my Bachelors and hopefully get into a PA school even though it is very competitive. The only thing I am concerned about with the PA school is not getting in and then kinda feeling lost at that point. I'm not saying that NP is a lot easier or a better route by any means but what I am going to say is at least when I become a BSN and decide to to become a NP, I can at least get into the school and have a chance of passing the school. Its hard to choose between the two careers though and what is truly stressing me out is the new semester for school starts in October and I have a little less then a month to make my decision so I can start to sign up for school. I understand Im the only one who can make my own decision and no one else can but thats why I started this thread, just to hear everyones advice. Worse case scenario I can always join the military after I receive my degree but we will see.
    I don't know what courses you have under your belt already, but the pre-reqs for nursing and the pre-reqs for a basic bachelor's in biology are similar. You need your writing, math, chemistry, biology, anatomy and physiology, gen eds, ect. Maybe talk to the school counselors and have your transcripts evaluated to see what courses you need to start nursing as well as get a bachelor's degree. That way you are still working on furthering your education, but don't have to make a sudden life altering decision now.
    Last edit by Studentnurse365 on Sep 5, '16 : Reason: Typos
  9. by   Libby1987
    I haven't caught up with all of the posts but here's what I tell my kids after 29 years as an RN..

    For the subsequent decades following graduation, what do you want to do all day long, what type of schedule can you commit tolerance, what type of working conditions and what kind of salary?

    Hands down, if you can make the competitive grades, PT has the best ROI if you look at scheduling and working conditions as well as wages. We'd hire you right out of school 115K M-F days, no call, no major holidays, pretty much everything that goes sideways is referred to mgmt and/or the RN. And the stress level isn't comparable to nursing or other providers.

    It's 7 yrs of school. NP is going to end up around that as well after you've pieced it together.
  10. by   BeenThere2012
    Quote from italianlifter
    Hello Beenthere2012,
    From what I have been reading from you is all about physcial thearpy which is not a problem with me by any means. The only thing about sports medicine is becoming a doctor. I'm not trying to sound rude when I say this but I just can't see myself doing just about 12 years of schooling or more to become a sports medicine doctor. Yes of course it is a very intriguing field to me and I would not mind doing it in the slightest, it's just the amount of schooling that it requires. Not sure if I want to be in school for that long and I really hope I do not sound lazy cause those are not my intentions by any means. Also the physcial thearpy was once thought about but I am not quite sure I still wanna do physcial thearpy. I'm not saying it's not a rewarding career or a waste a time cause it is most definitely a good career but I'm not sure if it is worth it to me. Not trying to sound rude but I have been hearing that majority of places require atleast a doctorate in that field.
    I don't take your responses as rude at all. I realize now that physical therapists require a PhD now. That didn't used to be the case...I'm sorry I misspoke.
    I have loved being a nurse. My only concern for you is your statement about bodily fluids...there is a lot of that in nursing...However, as others have said, there are specialties where you wouldn't have to deal with that as much, but in the beginning you would as a student and the first few years until you get some basic experience before choosing a specialty such as a surgical nurse etc...You already have gotten some good advice on how to minimize your expenses to pay for school. Community college
    to start, then transfer to a state college , for example to get your BSN. It's doable without huge debt. Good luck to you! I hope it all works out.
  11. by   Horseshoe
    The typical physical therapy degree is not a Ph.D, it's a DPT.

    FAQ - What is the difference between the DPT and the PhD? - YouTube
  12. by   CardiacDork
    I got my ASN for 8K.

    My hospital will pay for my BSN 100%.

    Local community colleges are key. Of course, if your prerequisites have horrid marks then you'll have to go to an expensive for profit school. Of course if you live in California you'll be on waiting lists for years.
  13. by   ohiobobcat
    Another avenue to consider, although you seem to have your heart set on nursing, is an athletic training degree. I have my BS in Health, Athletic Training/Exercise Physiology. Check out the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) website to get more info. A certified athletic trainer is different than a personal trainer. It's a great career to combine your love for fitness and desire to help people. I loved it until I became a single mom. It's a 4 year degree, although some do go on to get their masters. My fellow classmates are physical therapists (more schooling obviously), working for a triple A baseball team, working as head athletic trainers for multiple NCAA colleges at all division levels, and working at sports medicine clinics during the day and covering high school sports in the afternoon/evenings. I just thought I would provide you with more education as to what the athletic training degree is and what you can do with it, as you skimmed over other people mentioning athletic training and sports medicine. Good luck in whatever you decide.

    I copied and pasted the following from the NATA website:

    Professional training education uses a competency-based approach in both the classroom and clinical settings. Using a medical-based education model, athletic training students are educated to provide comprehensive patient care in five domains of clinical practice: prevention; clinical evaluation and diagnosis; immediate and emergency care; treatment and rehabilitation; and organization and professional health and well-being. The educational requirements for CAATE-accredited athletic training education programs include acquisition of knowledge, skills and clinical abilities along with a broad scope of foundational behaviors of professional practice. Students complete an extensive clinical learning requirement that is embodied in the clinical integration proficiencies (professional, practice oriented outcomes) as identified in the Athletic Training Education Competencies (PDF).
    Students must receive formal instruction in the following specific subject matter areas identified in the Competencies:

    • Evidence-based practice
    • Prevention and health promotion
    • Clinical examination and diagnosis
    • Acute care of injury and illness
    • Therapeutic interventions
    • Psychosocial strategies and referral
    • Health care administration
    • Professional development and responsibility

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