Last week on preceptorship

  1. So, this week coming up will be my last week on preceptorship. I am soooo nervous to be alone, which I am sure everyone is at first.
    With that being said, I decided to jump on here and ask some of you for advice.
    Is there anything I should FOR SURE try to see or get done this week? It's my last one, so I'd like to make it super beneficial and touch on all last minute things.
    Im in the ER, so if you happen to be in the ED tell me what might be helpful for me to see or do this last week.
    Thank you so much guys
  2. Visit Alexx_xox profile page

    About Alexx_xox, ADN, RN

    Joined: Dec '17; Posts: 171; Likes: 144
    from US
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    15 Comments

  3. by   missmollie
    This week you should take your personal photo down from an anonymous forum for nurses. That should be your goal.

    I'm not an ED nurse, so I have no suggestions for you. Best of luck when you are on your own!
  4. by   Alexx_xox
    How is that relevant?
  5. by   Buckeye.nurse
    Have you been getting weekly reviews from your preceptor and/or nurse educator? If so, I would focus on areas they have noted as "opportunities for improvement". Any procedure or protocol that happens so rarely that you haven't seen it yet is unlikely to happen in your last week of orientation. Maybe have your preceptor put the word out in the ED that you guys are looking for unusual events. Otherwise, know that your first year is an extension of orientation in a way, no matter your area of specialty. Ask for help if you need it, don't be afraid to ask questions, and find a good mentor. Best of luck!
  6. by   psu_213
    I don't know what you have seen during your preceptorship, and you never know what is going to come through that door, so it is really impossible to say what you should try and see. I would try to take a patient/patients (the number depending on how much you have done so far) and make them yours. Of course you must tell your preceptor what you are going to do for each patient before you do it...i.e., don't just go in and do things without talking to your preceptor first, but tell him/her "I'm going to go in and assess the new patient in room 5." "I am going to get room 5's meds and pass them." Make sure your preceptor is aware of your future actions, and he/she will still have to supervise as policy dictates, but take the initiative to know what to do next with your patient(s) without being told.

    As for your photo...Nursing is a small world. You never know when an innocent appearing comment you made on here will be taken out of context used against you when looking for a job. Taking your picture down will significantly reduce that risk
  7. by   Susie2310
    Alexx, what was your preceptorship like? How was it structured? I remember you took ACLS, PALS, TNCC, and ENPC before you started working with a preceptor. How did your preceptorship progress from then until now, your final week with your preceptor?
  8. by   TruvyNurse
    I would ask yourself, what protocols and procedures are you unfamiliar or uncomfortable with and go from there. Did you have a preceptor objective/ skills sheet? Id review it. Hopefully they won't just throw you to the wolves. You're still going to have questions and make mistakes even off orientation. Never be afraid to ask!
    I will agree with my above posters about the personal pictures. It could come back to bite you. Why chance it?
    Relax. You've made it this far. Best of luck
  9. by   sallyrnrrt
    Quote from Alexx_xox
    How is that relevant?
    Today possible nothing.....

    But it is a personal identifier......you should want some distance towards being anonymous
  10. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Alexx_xox
    How is that relevant?
    Sooner or later you are going to express a controversial, stupid or wrong-headed opinion, ask a stupid or poorly phrased question, reveal too much about a work situation you're either venting about or asking for help with or be recognized by a work colleague who will then scrutinize everything you post. It is better not to be recognized, and if you ARE recognized, it is better to leave a reasonable doubt. People have lost their jobs because because of injudicious postings.
  11. by   saskrn
    Make sure you know where everything is, and how to get whatever else is needed.

    Maybe look at it this way, what do you need to know to at least function on a basic level? A few thoughts: know how the rooms, carts, etc, are stocked, know where phone lists are, be aware of any common standing orders and procedures, know how everything on the crash cart works and where it's located.

    It depends on what trauma level you are, but I doubt they'll be assigning you with the most critical patients/traumas.

    Good luck!
  12. by   Alexx_xox
    Quote from Susie2310
    Alexx, what was your preceptorship like? How was it structured? I remember you took ACLS, PALS, TNCC, and ENPC before you started working with a preceptor. How did your preceptorship progress from then until now, your final week with your preceptor?
    yes, in the beginning we received all of our certificates to knock them out of the way. I have loved my preceptorship but along with many other new grads, I truly wish it was a couple weeks longer
  13. by   wondern
    Quote from Alexx_xox
    How is that relevant?
    Because you asked.
  14. by   Susie2310
    Quote from Alexx_xox
    yes, in the beginning we received all of our certificates to knock them out of the way. I have loved my preceptorship but along with many other new grads, I truly wish it was a couple weeks longer
    Alexx, how was your preceptorship structured? I'm not asking about the certificates; I know about those. How did your preceptorship progress over the weeks - what did you learn each week? What care have you provided to patients and what procedures have you performed during your preceptorship? You are asking for people to give you advice about what you should see or do during your last week of preceptorship; in order to do that I am asking you about what you have already learned. So, what have you learned during your preceptorship? What did you do during your preceptorship? Saying you loved your preceptorship tells me nothing about what you learned. Please don't give a canned reply that you loved your preceptorship. If you want genuine answers you need to be genuine too.
    Last edit by Susie2310 on May 21

close