If you apply and accept a job, don't bail out for no good reason - page 3

I'm of the opinion that, we should do our due diligence before we accept a job. We need to find out specifics such as ratios, hours, etc. Then we make the commitment to work there. Unless you've been... Read More

  1. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from TriciaJ
    Anyone who'll quit a nursing job because they "aren't challenged" are lying to themselves and everyone else. I'll bet whoever follows them on the next shift is plenty challenged picking up their dropped balls and cleaning up after them.
    Beverage alert! This one is so true and so obvious . . .
  2. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Libby1987
    This and other posts stating that employers don't care.. I clearly work for a helluva organization and appreciate them more everyday because they are nothing like described above. No doubt some employees believe the organization has no loyalty but if they were on the other side of the curtain they'd be blown away at the efforts made to be a good and fair employer. Or maybe they'd dismiss those efforts.. perspective.

    .
    In forty years, and in hospitals on the east coast, west coast and midwest, I've worked for organizations that were good and fair employers. I have never worked for one that wasn't. I must be incredibly lucky. Or maybe all of those awful hospitals to dump employees for no good reason aren't really so awful.
  3. by   klone
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    In forty years, and in hospitals on the east coast, west coast and midwest, I've worked for organizations that were good and fair employers. I have never worked for one that wasn't. I must be incredibly lucky. Or maybe all of those awful hospitals to dump employees for no good reason aren't really so awful.
    I'm guessing you've never encountered that because you're a competent employee who has never had to be let go in the first several months of employment. That's why there's often a 90-day probationary period. That way, hospitals can get a feel for whether or not an employee will work out. During that time, a manager may determine that an employee just isn't a good fit, and they will terminate them. They need give no reason at all, other than "It's just not working out." That is totally within their rights, for the greater good of the unit. Just as an employee can determine in the first few months that the hospital or job is not a good fit for them. It's a two-way street. If we are okay with hospitals doing that, we should be okay with employees doing it as well.

    That was my point - a hospital exercising their right to terminate an employee because they're not a good fit doesn't make them a ****** hospital. Just like an employee doing the same doesn't make them a ****** employee.
  4. by   JKL33
    Hard work and loyalty were spoken and unspoken themes with which I was raised. They are important to me and are probably the reason I've never had any employment-related difficulty.

    Loyalty is a bit like trust in that some people think it is owed, others think it is earned. In reality they are both things that only work out when both given and earned. Otherwise they're just someone's demand or someone's unearned goodwill. If one party's agenda doesn't involve earning and cultivating loyalty, then the idea that any loyalty is owed is not legitimate.

    The laundry list of business-of-healthcare practices that are not consistent with the idea of anyone being very concerned about loyalty grows every day. Although I've never required an employer to fill an emotional role in my life, at some point they have to either pretend they care about decent treatment of people or else roll with the natural consequences, which is nothing more than what they expect from employees!

    Priorities clarified. Life is good. Usually-picky conscience is silent.

  5. by   nightlightnurseaide
    they actually lied about the ratio in my job. i was told some nights we would get four nurses, since our co-worker quit we been getting two. I have half a mind to leave that place and never come back
  6. by   amzyRN
    I believe that our time is more valuable than anything and if someone absolutely hates their job, they should leave. If their dream job opens up, take it. If somoene finds that they are getting sick from night shift, get a day shift some where else. Life is short and we really never know when our time will come. I believe in living for the present as much as possible. I believe in giving 100% to an employer while on the job, but if some bad things are going down and it is affecting your health then it's okay to leave. We are not endentured servants to an employer.

    With that said, job hopping does look bad on the resume, so I think it is wise to choose wisely the next time around-ask the tough questions-listen to your gut. I've had a few short stays that managers have asked about and I have had some legit reasons for leaving so they were understanding. However, my current job I know that I need to keep it for a while as to not ruin my resume. Employers will often offer insentives to stay. Many SNFs exploit the new grads they hire, little to no orientation, wanting them to work off the clock, unsafe care, etc. Just my 2 cents.
  7. by   Have Nurse
    Quote from Sour Lemon
    I disagree. Employers don't hesitate to drop employees who no longer meet their needs ...and they don't hire people because they "care" about them on a personal or professional level. Employees shouldn't feel obligated to offer anything that employers don't offer. Nothing in exchange for nothing seems pretty fair to me.

    I would like you to revisit this argument. "Employees shouldn't feel obligated to offer anything that employers don't offer." What do you mean by that?

    If an employer drops a new employee within 90 days, it is their right to do so, whether or not you agree with them. Expectations may differ, which is why it needs to be clarified during the interview what the expectations are. And the new person, needs to take it seriously.

    Nursing is a plethora of age groups, diagnosis, urgency, confusion, and life and death matters. The high school attitude has to be left at the door. Don't get me wrong. I love new grads and am happy to there for them. But many young people come into this environment with "TV expectations", and are disappointed when it doesn't pan out the way in which they expect.

    It takes some maturity to know whether or not you will be a good fit somewhere. It does take time. But some employers, because of their experience, experience, not fairness, can tell when it's time to cut the ties. If someone doesn't meet their needs, it may be that the new person isn't pulling their weight, or is a risk to keep. I've seen that a lot!

    Just a perspective, that's all.

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