I want to be a nurse, but....

  1. I sure hope this doesn't sound as stupid to you as it sounds to me.

    I am currently getting my MA in Health Studies to be a health educator. I'd like to get at least my LPN also. The thing holding me back? I'm afraid to jab people. Let me be clear: I'm not squeamish or afraid of needles. I'm afraid of having to try several times to put in that poor man's catheter or jab that poor lady 5 times to draw blood.

    See, told you it was a stupid fear. Has anyone else had this problem, and how did you get over it?

    Thank you!
  2. Visit SkyeOwl profile page

    About SkyeOwl

    Joined: Sep '05; Posts: 6

    10 Comments

  3. by   TazziRN
    Practice!!
  4. by   vamedic4
    Not to worry Skye..., and Tazzi is right. Practice is all you need. All of us were squeemish at one time or another...as I've posted before..when I was a medic in training I couldn't hit water if I fell off a boat when it came to IVs.
    Now, many years later I get calls from everywhere to start IVs on other floor's kiddos. It just takes time..and lots of practice!!

    That way, you've only got to stick them ONCE...hopefully you'll never have to stick someone 5 times.

    vamedic4
    22 minutes from going home
    Last edit by vamedic4 on Aug 12, '06
  5. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from SkyeOwl
    I sure hope this doesn't sound as stupid to you as it sounds to me.

    I am currently getting my MA in Health Studies to be a health educator. I'd like to get at least my LPN also. The thing holding me back? I'm afraid to jab people. Let me be clear: I'm not squeamish or afraid of needles. I'm afraid of having to try several times to put in that poor man's catheter or jab that poor lady 5 times to draw blood.

    See, told you it was a stupid fear. Has anyone else had this problem, and how did you get over it?

    Thank you!
    I'm going to let you in on a little-known, closely guarded secret: no one was born with the ability to stick someone perfectly and do a textbook blood draw, or insert a catheter (of any type) well without making a bunch of trial runs.

    Practice, which is something every nursing student does, is what gets you through
  6. by   epiphany
    Let your first few tries be "juicy" people to get your confidence. Not as easy as it sounds if you work in a geriatic floor, though. L&D's are great for that. Know that if you fail after a few tries you can (and should) get someone experienced to take over.
  7. by   Tweety
    There are going to be those people you're going to have to jab more than once.

    It's good personal practice to only jab twice and then call it quits and ask for someone else to try for you.

    Good luck!
  8. by   tinderbox
    I agree. The first several times choose people with veins that jump right out at you. Try twice at the MOST and then please let someone more experienced take over. Especially if that patient is a conscious one.
    As for catheters, try on men first. Women are, obviously, more challenging in that department.

    I've only been a nurse for a year. When I was a nursing student, I was TERRRRRIFIED of the thought of having to stick anything into anyone. I, myself, HATE needles and getting jabbed, plus I'm a "hard stick", so that didn't help. You'll get through it. We were all terrified at the beginning.
  9. by   purplemania
    Part of your fear is related to the unknown. Once you have been taught good technique and some anatomy/physiology you will feel more confident.
  10. by   Asklepios
    Several years ago, I had to go to the ER for a kidney stone attack. They were very busy that night, and had called some nurses in from other floors to help out. Anyway, one of those nurses was told to take my blood. I have deep veins, and this wasn't something I guess she did too much in her normal dept. She tried once in my right arm, then went to the left, where she made two attempts. She was going for a third when I looked down and saw blood on my shirt and the bedsheet. She apologized and told me she'd have someone else come over to do it. I felt bad for her because she was obviously nervous. I saw her a little later on and I told her not to worry about it. I joked that the pain of the needle took my mind off the kidney stone pain a bit, for which I was thankful.
    The point is, no matter what job you have, there's always going to be a time when you feel overwhelmed trying to learn how to do things. But after you do something enough, it becomes second nature and you don't even think about it. I'm not going to worry about it until I get to the point in school where they teach us how to do it, then I plan to pay close attention and hope I have an excellent instructor.
  11. by   SkyeOwl
    Thanks, everybody. You're right...practice, practice, practice. RNsRWE, you make a good point. I had a head-slap moment there! Of course everyone was where I am now.
  12. by   TinyNurse
    I have to agree with everyone else........there will be times that you can jab just once with a big one, and there are times when you jab a few times with a little one, and it just doesn't happen. The good thing is that there are cool people in your department who are there to help you out in your time of need. You help them, and they help you. Also, you have good days, and bad. It just sort of happens like that.

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