I need some advice/help to securing a nurse's aide position in the hospital.

  1. Long story, short... I'm in desperate need of employment and a summer job.

    I am a soon to be finished first year RN student in a two year program. Recently, the hospital posted up a lot of nurse's aides positions. Almost all the positions required CNA certification OR completion of the first semester of an RN program, which I've already done.

    I'm pretty sure I meet all the qualifications for the job. I have had 3 retail jobs that each were approximately a year in length ranging back to 2006. I've also applied to this hospital before, but never managed to get an interview except for this nursing externship position that was offered, but I was never contacted again so I'm assuming I didn't get it.

    This hospital is right next to my school and where I do clinicals at as well.

    What should I do to increase my changes of being hired? Should I call and ask about my application?
  2. Visit Spikey9001 profile page

    About Spikey9001, ADN, BSN

    Joined: Dec '09; Posts: 362; Likes: 226

    11 Comments

  3. by   studentgolfer
    Do you think it could ever hurt to inquire about the status of your application?

    I don't know why people think they cannot call the place that they have applied or interviewed at and ask if they need any more information, etc. This shows that you WANT the job and it gets your name in their ear again.
  4. by   Spikey9001
    Quote from studentgolfer
    Do you think it could ever hurt to inquire about the status of your application?

    I don't know why people think they cannot call the place that they have applied or interviewed at and ask if they need any more information, etc. This shows that you WANT the job and it gets your name in their ear again.
    Yeah, but most of the time when I do that I ALWAYS feel as though I'm annoying them or wasting their time more than "getting my name in their ear."
  5. by   missmun52
    Call and tell them your name and that you submitted your application on XYZ date and that you would like to inquire about the status of your application.

    Always call a few days after you have submitted an application and after an interview. It lets them know you really want the job and that phone call me be the determining factor between you someone else with the same qualifications.

    Thats just my 2 cents.
  6. by   Spikey9001
    Also, when I do call and give them that line, I get the generic "we are looking over applications and if you meet the qualifications, someone will give you a call."
  7. by   AgentBeast
    You're going to have a hell of a time finding employment as a CNA/PCT in a hospital as a nursing student. For most of these positions they are looking for people that are career CNA/PCTs, not a Nursing student who'll work through the summer then either quit at the end of the summer, or have an availability that will be next to nothing for the rest of the year. Your best bet is to find a summer nurse internship, although these programs are few and far between too.
  8. by   AtomicWoman
    Have you tried the per diem route? A lot of hospitals are desperate for people who can work odd schedules when they are needed. And it's a great "back door" way into an organization, because they get to see what kind of worker you are. Then you just keep your ear to the ground or read the employee intranet and wait for a regular position to open up. Good luck!
  9. by   Spikey9001
    No, I haven't...

    And how long should I wait before getting concerned and saying **** it?
  10. by   AtomicWoman
    When you call HR to follow-up (again) on your application, let it be known that you are willing to work just about any schedule -- full-time, part-time, per diem, etc. Nights if you can stand working nights. Tell them you love working weekends and holidays. Make yourself look about as flexible as can be. Also, if you met any nurse managers (best bet) or even staff nurses while you were doing clinicals, don't be shy about contacting them to give your application a boost. One call from a nurse manager goes a long way in many hospital HR departments.

    I would not give up yet. I know you need to work, so take any job you can get at this point. But keep trying. Come June when they realize their vacation schedule has created headaches for them, your application might start looking a lot better. Persistence really is the key.

    One other thought: contact your local home health agencies. I have seen ads from these agencies for 2nd year nursing students to act as CNAs, aides and/or companions to homebound folks. That would pump up your resume for sure.

    Good luck, and keep your chin up!
  11. by   AtomicWoman
    Another thought: write a lovely note to any nurse managers you know and the DON/CNO of the hospital. Tell them you've done clinicals there and you just *know* what a special place it would be to work. Stress your willingness to be highly dependable and willing to help them out with their inevitable scheduling issues. Believe me, they have them. It may fall to someone outside HR to schedule CNAs, but believe me, that person would *love* to have someone s/he can depend on. The person who schedules CNAs in my facility was frustrated the other day because she said "the CNA jobs are a revolving door". In other words, they get a lot of turnover. So don't give up. Don't expect to hear directly from a DON/CNO, but it can never hurt to contact everyone possible in a facility.
  12. by   studentgolfer
    Quote from dmoney8827
    Yeah, but most of the time when I do that I ALWAYS feel as though I'm annoying them or wasting their time more than "getting my name in their ear."
    If you are annoying them they need to find another job. You are EXPECTED to follow up on your job applications/interviews. Send thank you e-mails for any and all interviews or face to face interactions. It's no secret the squeaky wheel gets the oil.
  13. by   Spikey9001
    Quote from AtomicWoman
    When you call HR to follow-up (again) on your application, let it be known that you are willing to work just about any schedule -- full-time, part-time, per diem, etc. Nights if you can stand working nights. Tell them you love working weekends and holidays. Make yourself look about as flexible as can be. Also, if you met any nurse managers (best bet) or even staff nurses while you were doing clinicals, don't be shy about contacting them to give your application a boost. One call from a nurse manager goes a long way in many hospital HR departments.

    I would not give up yet. I know you need to work, so take any job you can get at this point. But keep trying. Come June when they realize their vacation schedule has created headaches for them, your application might start looking a lot better. Persistence really is the key.

    One other thought: contact your local home health agencies. I have seen ads from these agencies for 2nd year nursing students to act as CNAs, aides and/or companions to homebound folks. That would pump up your resume for sure.

    Good luck, and keep your chin up!
    This sounds like some solid advice. I will take it and follow through with it and see what happens. Thanks.

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