I just dont understand!!

  1. Why do colleges make you take classes that have NOTHING to do with nursing?? We are in such a dire need for nurses, yet colleges acrost the United States feel as though we need to know how to write a synthesis paper, or give a speech about Cancun. Algebra, in gereral, is not used and medical math is...But in our college math for meds is NOT the requirement, ALGEBRA IS??? What gives?? I just feel if the colleges of today would cut the bull s*%T classes, our immediate need for nurses could, and would be solved. Why do I need to know Boyles law in chemistry?? Shouldnt I be learning things that pertain to my nursing...Its all about the almighty dollar!!! NOT patient care!!! That upsets me!!:angryfire Anyone else feel this way, or am I over-reacting???
  2. Visit sassyson_989 profile page

    About sassyson_989

    Joined: Apr '09; Posts: 7; Likes: 6
    CNA; from US
    Specialty: 14 year(s) of experience in geriatrics

    21 Comments

  3. by   ohmeowzer RN
    this is how it has been since nursing school was taken out of the hospitals and placed in a college. i know these classes seem useless and they are for the most part, but in "all degree programs" you have to meet a credit requirement. thats just how it is... it boils down to the almighty dollar... you just go with the flow... do what you have to do and get your degree.
  4. by   luvbug080688
    If you went to a tech school or a community college to get your ADN you wouldn't be taking as many as the "BS classes". With the BSN though you get a well rounded program that covers a little of everything. I go to a liberal arts school so I knew going into it that I would be taking theology, philosophy, arts, etc.
  5. by   WalkieTalkie
    Don't most degree programs require you to take classes that have nothing to do with them? I agree, some of the classes I despised. However, I often enjoyed a lot of my electives.
  6. by   mustlovepoodles
    Every professional nurse needs a well-rounded basic education in addition to nursing classes. A little English/Lit, a little Western Civ,some Sciences, some Sociology and Psychology,and yes, Algebra, are the marks of a well-educated person. If you aren't interested in any of that, you might want to consider an LPN program or a bare-bones two-year degree program--they focus on the stuff you need to have(and speech is necessary, IMO) plus, nursing.

    Oh,and you're going to have to write term papers in any RN program.
  7. by   1styearsucks
    Yea I agree with you. I felt this way when I was in college. The first two years were BS classes. The last two were all nurses. My attitude was to do what you have to do to get the degree. I guess the you now know what the "BS" stands for in BSN..lol:spin:
  8. by   missy--kay
    Don't underestimate ADN programs. I took 2 years of prereqs before I started the actual program, and yes that did include English, Public Speaking, Spanish for Medical Professionals, Psychology, 2 Algebra classes, and of course Microbiology, A&P 1 and 2, Pathophysiology, Nutrition... etc...

    The only classes I don't take that the local BSN program does take is Leadership, Stats and Chemistry.
  9. by   ohmeowzer RN
    Quote from hoping 2 b rn
    Don't underestimate ADN programs. I took 2 years of prereqs before I started the actual program, and yes that did include English, Public Speaking, Spanish for Medical Professionals, Psychology, 2 Algebra classes, and of course Microbiology, A&P 1 and 2, Pathophysiology, Nutrition... etc...

    The only classes I don't take that the local BSN program does take is Leadership, Stats and Chemistry.
    you are correct ADN programs are considered " degree programs" and you will take alot of classes for them. any degree program you will need to take alot of classes. we all had to do it to get our degrees. you do what ya gotta do... and then you graduate and never think of it again!! yipeeee !!
  10. by   PICNICRN
    Be patient young grasshopper!!
    You'd be suprised how much of that knowedge you will draw upon later in life- oxyhemoglobin curve, sodium potassium pump, krebs cycle- it all comes back to you later! And I think you should be able to complete a few years of Algebra- we're talking about life or death calculations with "medical math" and a few years of Algebra might just make you stronger in that area.

    I think that the programs want to turn out well rounded individuals- there is alot more to nursing than just the tasks!
  11. by   RNCEN
    The ADN and diploma programs I am looking at are rigorous. Pre-reqs include Soc, Psych, Eng, a math, A&P 1 and 2, micro, chem, and more.

    I have a BA in another area, so I am fortunate that I already have some of the pre-reqs done. If I didn't have a family and bills to pay, I would go straight for the acceleratd BSN.

    I think taking courses that have "nothing" to do with nursing is needed...it develops different ways of thinking, and skills that are essential.

    My $.02
  12. by   jollydogg_RN
    Quote from luvbug080688
    If you went to a tech school or a community college to get your ADN you wouldn't be taking as many as the "BS classes". With the BSN though you get a well rounded program that covers a little of everything. I go to a liberal arts school so I knew going into it that I would be taking theology, philosophy, arts, etc.
    seriously? lol... i dont know any ADN in any community colleges around here that don't have the exact same pre-reqs. in my local state ADN program, i have the exact same pre-reqs for the most part.
  13. by   JBudd
    We are also professionals, not tradesmen. A professional is educated in more then just the mechanics of tasks, she is taught to think and reason, and has many resources on which to draw conclusions. Algebra teaches logic, the ability to put separate operations together and see what is not obvious, as well as relationships between disparate ideas. Being able to express yourself well, in both your charting and your communication with other professions is a necessity. There are far more aspects to nursing than just the hands on skills we use at the bedside, and a broad education is the foundation to doing more than empty bedpans.
  14. by   jollydogg_RN
    Quote from JBudd
    We are also professionals, not tradesmen. A professional is educated in more then just the mechanics of tasks, she is taught to think and reason, and has many resources on which to draw conclusions. Algebra teaches logic, the ability to put separate operations together and see what is not obvious, as well as relationships between disparate ideas. Being able to express yourself well, in both your charting and your communication with other professions is a necessity. There are far more aspects to nursing than just the hands on skills we use at the bedside, and a broad education is the foundation to doing more than empty bedpans.
    i agree to a point. most nursins conversions with medicine (ok, as far as IVE seen so far, graduate in may... and i mean in bedside nursing on a non specialized unit) use basic math to solve for equations, which dont require algebra.
    i mean algebra is more useful, than say stats, but ya. i dont think i'll EVER use stats, because i dont plan on doing research of any type. i dont think im going to be using the f of x anytime soon when i have to determine whether or not to hold a medicine

    take history... you learn a lot about how society evolved in america, the ways we came on how to be socially, politcally, and economically. its useful to gain insight as to why we are the way we are in america at this time.

    i kind of agree with the OP on some of the math though.

close