How was your first code blue? What role did you have? - page 4

The first code blue I ever participated in was at my first nursing job, while I was still in orientation. The patient was not mine. It was an older woman with breast implants. The nurses in the room... Read More

  1. by   Ageta
    My first time seeing ACLS was in ICU working as a caregiver at first year in nursing studies. I just looked and didn't to anything. Next one and the one I think as my first was a month after I started working in an ambulance. It was a long ride to go, so at first the EMT asked our team leader what he is supposed to do, as it was his first ACLS. Right after him I asked the same. We had 92yo man wth lots of diagnoses but the relatives had been doing CPR so we continued for minimum time and then called it. I've worked in ambulance for two years and have had 7 ACLS, only one we resuscitated.
  2. by   citylights89
    Wow, these tales are really descriptive. Although I appreciate it, I have to stop reading this thread. I'm about to cry. Too many bad memories about my Mom.
  3. by   Carolid
    My first code was actually just this past Saturday. I'm not even a nursing student yet (though hopefully being admitted to a wonderful school in the next couple of months ), but I am an EMT. Older guy, COPD and dialysis pt. Got called out as difficulty breathing, then shifted to a code. Upon arrival he had gurgly respirations and did have a pulse. They paced him, but he went down and we started compressions. No shockable rhythm. I managed airway throughout and got to drop the king airway. It was a really exciting moment for me! First time I got to drop the king, suction, and drop an OPA. Unfortunately, the pt did not make it.
  4. by   HopefulRN7
    My first code was as a 3rd semester nursing student at a LTC center. I was running the treatment cart as two CNA's flew down the hall past me from the dining room pushing a very limp and cyanotic resident backward in her wheelchair yelling "Code! Code!!" I followed them into the residents room as they thrust her down onto her bed as two facility nurses (one being the DON) entered the room with the crash cart and immediately started compressions and bagging for what seemed like an eternity. I didn't notice the chest rise and fall so suggested checking the airway, grabbed the suction and pulled up a large piece of partially chewed steak from DEEP. DON suggested I take over with compressions after airway was clear between shocks and did so until EMS showed but by then she had no shockable rhythm and was gone despite our efforts.
    Definitely opened my eyes as an observer and lesson was learned to ALWAYS check the airway before bagging, even the most seasoned nurses can get caught up in the chaos and forget the basics.
    Haven't had a code as a licensed nurse yet but that image will always be in the back of my mind.
  5. by   flutist
    Just had my first code tonight after being a nurse for almost 5 years. It was my coworkers pt. We heard the pt groan loudly so went to go check on pt. Still had a pulse but no respirations. We started bagging and then MD came in. Then we had no pulse so compressions were started. I took over bagging since I at least knew how to do that and let the more experienced staff take over. Pt didn't make it and we called it after 20 mins. I'm glad that I was there at next time, I will be more comfortable and more helpful. I was surprised at how calm I was (on the inside I was freaking out).
  6. by   mindofmidwifery
    I work in the ER so no code blues but it was maybe my second day (as a tech, I'm not a nurse) and we had a heroin overdose come in where I got to do chest compressions. My adrenaline was rushing like never before. It's an amazing experience to participate in codes
  7. by   ICUman
    Quote from mindofmidwifery
    I work in the ER so no code blues but it was maybe my second day (as a tech, I'm not a nurse) and we had a heroin overdose come in where I got to do chest compressions.
    A code blue and a code are the exact same thing. If you're doing compressions the patient is coding. Code blue is more of a floor nursing term. In ICU and ER we tend to use the terms "code, coding", but it's the exact same thing. So the ER does get code blues by technical means.
  8. by   mindofmidwifery
    Quote from ICUman
    A code blue and a code are the exact same thing. If you're doing compressions the patient is coding. Code blue is more of a floor nursing term. In ICU and ER we tend to use the terms "code, coding", but it's the exact same thing. So the ER does get code blues by technical means.
    I understand that but I'm saying they aren't called code blues [emoji29] I think I'd be questioning what the heck I'm doing if I didn't already know everything you just said
  9. by   wanderlust99
    Mine was in nursing school, in the ED. I did compressions. It was my first time looking into a dead man's eyes and it was quite unreal.
  10. by   akulahawkRN
    The first code blue I ever worked was in the field, when I was still orienting as an EMT some 17 years ago. Elderly woman down, after working on her hedges by the driveway. Fire got on scene first, defib x2, did a round of CPR, I got in a round, and one more defib and we obtained ROSC. Around that time, a transport medic unit got on scene and the medic got the tube and I rode in with the patient in a different company's ambulance, my job was to be the vent... I figure that at $7.25/hr, I was probably the cheapest vent that patient would end up being on for a while.
  11. by   ReadyToListen
    Pre nursing student, working CNA/ER clerk. First code I witnessed was, to be perfectly honest, a very blessed and peaceful event. Drive up patient, daughter notifies triage that pt is "passed out in the car". 2 RNs take stretcher to patient, move her to a code/trauma room. 12-lead shows a reasonable rhythm based on pt history (afib?). Less than 2 minutes later, physician notes Cheyne-Stokes and requests more nurses in addition to the 2 in the room with him. Two rounds of compressions and one shock later, the daughter asked the recorder "how likely that she will come back from all this effort?" She was very calm and collected even though she was crying some; the recorder told her that at 98 years old, it's not very good. The daughter called it instantly, to our great relief. Never saw a family more in tune with one another to unanimously make the right decision.

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